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Good recurve bow???



By: simp_08
Posted: 22-Nov-03

Wanting to get into the traditional archery world and was wondering what ur guys thoughts are? Wanting good bow for beginner trad. Any and all help thanks.


By: MT
Posted: 22-Nov-03

I just made the same move myself. I bought a Martin X200. While I was able to buy a used one in excellent shape for $125, a new one lists for $210-$220. I think it's a good boy to start out with before you go sinking any $$ into a brand new custom Silvertip. mmmmmmm, Silvertip. Oh sorry, yeah, the X200.


By: Troy
Posted: 23-Nov-03

Check St. Charles bows on ebay. $200 to $250 range and excellent quality.


By: leftybearfan
Posted: 23-Nov-03

There are a number of great bows available used for a pretty reasonable price. I would try to find a Bear Grizzly or Kodiak. As Turtlejim said, Martins are pretty hard to beat as well. If you go to Ebay and do a search in sporting goods for recurve bows you should find everything you need.


By: Greywolf
Posted: 23-Nov-03

Take down bows are nice too, as for the name? well, They are a lot of great bows out there. Just check around. Pro shops have a few now and then. Remember most of us have lots of bows !


By: Stillhunter
Posted: 23-Nov-03

Does anyone have any experience with a Martin Hatfield Takendown Recurve? I was wondering what kind of qualities the hatfield is known for, ie. stacking, noise, smoothness? etc.

I now own a 62" 60# Hatfield but haven't shot it much.


By: leftybearfan
Posted: 23-Nov-03

I don't own a Hatfield but I have shot a friend's a few times and it felt great to me. It was very smooth and didn't stack for me (I have a 28 inch draw). As for the noise factor, I really can't remember if it is noisy or not. Everyone I have talked to about the Hatfields has nothing but positive things to say. Have fun.


By: Phil Magistro
Posted: 23-Nov-03

The Martin Hunter is an excellent bow for novice or expert. It's 62" long with a smooth draw and good performance. You can find good deals on used ones. Better yet, get to a traditional shoot or dealer and try as many bows as you can. There are a lot of opinions on what the "best" bow is and you need to find the one you like best, not one that someone else tells you they like.

You didn't mention your age, but if you are presently shooting a compound over 55#, I'd suggest keeping the draw weight around 45-50# for the recurve. It is different shooting a recurve than a compound and you don't want to overbow yourself.

Phil


By: leftybearfan
Posted: 23-Nov-03

Phil hit the nail right on the head. Try a bunch and see what feels best to you. That is the first thing I noticed when I started piddling with traditional bows. There are some bows that other guys love and shoot really well that I can't shoot worth a crap. There are some great bows that sell for nearly 1000 dollars that I can't it a barn with and there are some 50 dollar bows that I can shoot great. My favorite bow was an old Bear Grizzly, 45# at 28". I bought it used for 50 dollars and shot it well until two years ago when (sniff sniff) it broke a limb. Try a bunch and see what you like.


By: martinbobcat
Posted: 24-Nov-03

PHIL, I HAVE BEEN LOOKING AT THE MARTIN HUNTER. DID YOU GET YOURS BRAND NEW?? IF SO, DO YOU KNOW WHERE I CAN GET A GOOD DEAL ON A NEW ONE?


By: Phil Magistro
Posted: 24-Nov-03

I haven't owned a Hunter since the early 80's. I did buy mine new then. If you're looking at new bows, there are several sponsors here that carry them including Balck Widow and Hustom King. I've seen a lot of good deals on used bows on eBay.

Phil


By: Bill in SJ
Posted: 24-Nov-03

I started shooting traditional in addition to my compound. The only recurve I've ever owned was a RedWing Hunter (42#) I bought in 1968, and last January I bought a second one (54#). I'm obviously biased since they're the only recurves I've ever owned. I'd recommend one to a friend, they generally sell around $100 on eBay.

On thing is my compound shooting has gotten better since I stared shooting traditional. I think it's not depending on the pins (as much), and my shoulder muscles being stronger.

I think a compound and recurve both use the same muscles to about the 'peak' point on a compound, but when the compound's weight is dropping, the recurves obviously stays the same, and it's the muscles in the rear (your back) of your shoulder that come into use(for the first time in your life it seems!).

I had to 'work-into' the 54# bow by just drawing it daily until I got fatigued. Started with a couple dozen times, then it was more. Started shooting it, at first it was tough to anchor many times and my fingers hurt, but that stopped. My point is, don't know how to pick a recurve at the typical hunting draw weight and try-it-out is you're not in shape.

In my case, I bought the used bow and worked into it. The 58" AMO (~54" string) has not been a problem, but again I've never shot a longer bow besides trying one for a few shots.

Bill


By: simp_08
Posted: 24-Nov-03

Thanks for the info guys. Phil im 18 and my compound is set at 60# I was thinking about getting 55# Just looking at all my options. Wish there was a bow shop around here. Not to much around were i live lol.


By: MDbowhunter
Posted: 25-Nov-03

Keep in mind the shooting style's between compounds and traditional equipment are night and day. If your shooting a 55 lb compound now a 55 lb traditional bow should be fine. Although you dont have the let-off of a compound, you do seem to release sooner. Maybe someone in your area has an old recurve than can let you try.

Good Luck

WM


By: Bill in SJ
Posted: 26-Nov-03

Try the question on the Leatherwall- www.stickbow.com is the companion site to the Bowsite. Say where you live, and I'm pretty sure you'll find a traditional guy there willing to help you out.

Bill


By: plasticpail
Posted: 26-Nov-03

I shoot 75# with compounds and find that 55 is the best recurve/longbow weight for me.I have a 60 but find I shoot the 55 better.You may find 55 is a bit much if you are shooting 60 in a compound now.I would try a 50 and see from there. Drop by a range where the trad guys are and ask around.Someone will let you try their bow and help you determine what is best for you. Pete


By: Phil Magistro
Posted: 26-Nov-03

simp_08 - Since you're shooting 60 now I'd suggest a recurve of no more than 50#. You use a different set of muscles to draw a recurve. One way to tell if a recurve is too heavy is to draw it while pointing at the floor, as though you were shooting straight down from a treestand.

Remember too that with a compound you can point it up and break it over as you come down. With a recurve you draw as you bring it up. Try it and you'll see what I mean.

Don't know where in OH you are, but years ago there wa a shop in St. Clairsville that carried recurves. American???something...maybe. Sorry but I can't remember the exact name.

Phil


By: the hairless one!
Posted: 26-Nov-03

i just saw a really nice one on ebay! here is a link! it is pretty cheap too.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3641451045

rick


By: wahyeh
Posted: 27-Nov-03

Spend the money for a Wes Wallace. You can't go wrong with his bows.


By: BHUNTN
Posted: 27-Nov-03

check out blacktailarchery.com


By: BTPro38DC
Posted: 28-Nov-03

http://www.recurves.com

Atilla and Falcon look like incredibly good bows for the asking price.

I just got an all-wood longbow kit to finish, and some cedar arrows. If I can practice enough to get good with it, I will probably sell one or two of my compounds, and get a Checkmate bow.


By: Rainmaker
Posted: 28-Nov-03

The worst mistake I ever made when getting into traditional archery in 1989 was buying a longbow at 70 lbs draw. Then I traded for one at 60. Still bad choice. Since your compound is 60 lbs. - please take my advice from experience - buy a recurve that is 45 lbs and no more. It will be sufficient for killing deer. However, most importantly you can learn to shoot instinctively without fighting weight - which brings on a HUGE list of bad habits that are extremely hard to break.

I'll also add that the Martin Mamba recurve is a very nice shooter. Get one in 45 #'s and you won't be disappointed. You can upgrade later. I used to have one I bought new from Bass Pro for $225.00 - I wish I still had it.

Good luck.


By: DarkHunter
Posted: 13-Jan-09

I used to be strickly olympic and now shoot You wont need to upgrade after the Mamba. Trust me. If you want another bow after a while buy a new one and keep the mamba. Personally I think the new coloring is a little odd, but it's a great bow. I bought mine 3years back and still have it. I bought it at 50# and it feels like most at 30-40. Smooth, fast, sleet, and a thin grip that'll prob remind you of ur compound. It remeinded me of my Olympic. it felt like it was molded for my hand. The only thing is that I wouldn't suggest it as a beginner because of the price. It's worth the price but I'd say get a cheaper Martin forst. I've shot the X200, X150, Rebel, Stick, Savana, and recently sold my Hunter and have a Mamba. Since you're new to traditional, I'd say stick to traditional recurve. The feel will be easier to get used to and you don't need as firm a grip as with long bows. Long bows and some hybrids (recurve/long bow combinations) have much more shock than what you're used to. Some of them have such a bad shock that you'll have to choke the bow in order to not feel wierd. Some have a wierd handle that may dig into your palm and may hurt your hand a good amount. I know that the old Martin Vision had an almost triangle handle that hurt like hell.

The Hoyt Game Master II is great but is a little loud and does't look traditional. For the most part the only complaint I've seen with it is that it doesn't look traditional mostly. The sound is my personal view and from a friend's. I hope this helps you.


By: David in Hickory
Posted: 13-Jan-09

The Best advice I have is to come to the Trad expo in kalamazoo, MI the last weekend in jan and shoot everything you can. Lon Collins, who should be just to the right just as you walk in the doors always has a lot of bows and a lot of good deals, and there will be a ton of guys there to help you out...just my 2 cents...btw if you need any help while you're there (if you come) stop by the Professional Bowhunters Society booth and ask for David and I will be more than happy to help you out.

Regards, David


By: Zman
Posted: 14-Jan-09

I've been shooting traditional for 27 years. For a 1st bow and starting out, I would recommend a used Bear or something along that line. Maybe 45-50#. BUT, beware, it is an addiction and soon you will be wanting all of them:)...Blacktail, Widow, Pronghorn, Schafer, Bighorn, etc. Speaking from experience. Ask your questions on www.stickbow.com


By: Deerman1
Posted: 14-Jan-09

I have a really nice entry level T/D for sale for $200. PM me if you are interested


By: switchback07
Posted: 14-Jan-09

You could check out Mad Dog bows too. He will custom make you a bow for around $300.00, my buddy got one and its real nice.. He had it a week and harvested a doe..


By: Jeeper
Posted: 14-Jan-09

I normally shoot a compound set at 60#. My favourite recurve is 51# @28". because I draw close to 29, the 51# is barely within my comfort zone for drawing and holding for several seconds. So, as others have said, don't overbow yourself. You will need to "grow" into it with the development of the right muscles. Good luck in your search. Oh yeah, I've had several Bear Grizzly recurves, a Browning recurve, and now have a custom-made "Drifter" made for me by the late Jim Brackenbury (65# which I can no longer pull comfortably) and my current recurve, a Canadian-made bow.


By: 1ST CAV
Posted: 09-Nov-09

COULD ANYONE COMMENT ON THE SHAFER BOW REPUTATION, QUALITY AND CUSTOMER SERVICE?


By: Grizzlymike
Posted: 09-Nov-09

I see this thread originally was Nov 2003. Brought back to life after 6 years. I wonder how Simp_08 is doing now after 6 years of experience of traditional equipment. Or if he even stuck with it.


By: acadianarcher
Posted: 10-Nov-09

can't go wrong with a martin or a Chek MAte. I shoot a Chek Mate KIngs PAwn. Love it.


By: russelback
Posted: 10-Nov-09

Black Widow for sure!


By: BSBD
Posted: 11-Nov-09

Emperor,

If you really draw 74@30 then 203 fps is slow for a 512 grain arrow, plus that's a really light arrow for that bow. "Pretty quick" would be 203 fps for a 750 grain arrow. I've owned Martins and Check-mates and they're both great bows but I think Check-Mates are are the better value and a better bow overall for the price.


By: trkytrack
Posted: 11-Nov-09

Whatever you do, don't buy a bow over 45 pounds to start with. You can always trade up as you get to where you can shoot good enough to put all your arrows in a paper plate at 20 yards. 45 pounds will kill a deer easy enough. Go to the classified section here on Bowsite and you'll find plenty of deals on recurves and longbows. Goodd luck on your venture; you won't regret it.


By: St. Croix
Posted: 11-Nov-09

Doesn't matter what you buy at this point, cause once you become hooked you will be buying bows like a mad man. Get a Blacktail or Rose Oak and be done with it, there ain't any better!


By: Show-Me Greg
Posted: 11-Nov-09

Go over to tthe LeatherWall and do some reading. Lotssssssssssssss of opinions.

For me, the Quinn Stallion, hands down. You won't find a better bow for twice the money..


By: Pintail
Posted: 11-Nov-09

Go on www.stickbow or www.Tradgang and try to find a deal on a used morrison cheyenne or shawnee. If you find you don't like the bow you will always get your money back. Bob Morrison is a class act and builds one of the best bows out there.


By: LongbowBob
Posted: 12-Nov-09

First of all, I completely agree with those who are sugesting that you not over bow yourself. 45-50 lbs. will do the job just fine and you will kill most any critter you want to go after with it. I took a 50 lb recurve to Africa and had absolutely no problems. I shot clean through a Kudu, and they are the size of an elk.

Now, many will say just buy a cheaper used bow, and when I went into it I went into it, I took a different tact.

I decided to buy the bow I would want eventually first. Because I knew that this would be a tough road, and if I had made a significant investment and had this beautiful bow sitting there calling to me, I would work through the hard spaces and keep at it.

That worked for me.

LBB


By: fuzzy
Posted: 12-Nov-09

ditto the <50# draw Martin x-200


End of Topic
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