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arrow length vs draw length



By: Pyrannah
Posted: 22-Feb-11

just curious what your draw length is and your arrow length

I currently shoot 28" arrow with 29" DL I'm thinking going to 30" arrow


By: JTV
Posted: 22-Feb-11

Depends on the set up, rest and where the arrow is cut....mine are cut 1 inch to 1 1/2 inch from the front of the rest prongs(Code Red)....my draw is 29.5 inches and the arrows are 28 3/4 inch ..... Jeff


By: Vectrix80
Posted: 22-Feb-11

draw lenght 30" arrow lenght 28 1/2"


By: Pyrannah
Posted: 22-Feb-11

yeah, with my rest i can shoot 28 arrows but have been wanting to get the broadhead out in front of the riser.. for that i need 30" arrow..


By: assassin84
Posted: 22-Feb-11

I myself shoot a 26.5 inch draw with a 27.5 inch arrow and seems to work well for me i also shoot 100g 3 blade muzzy


By: x-man
Posted: 22-Feb-11

One has very little to do with the other. Other than the obvious case where your arrow must at least hang in front of the rest. Arrow length is determined by adding all the variables together first. Shaft spine, calculated peak bow weight, point weight, draw length, ect... all play into the final length of the arrow. Unless you never plan to use broadheads, like for instance a target-only setup. Field points will group well even when not tuned well.


By: Spike Bull
Posted: 23-Feb-11

As usual, I agree whole heartedly with x-man.

Cutting arrows makes them stiffer.

Arrow length, after the safety concerns x-man mentioned, is entirely about matching the SPINE of the arrow to the bow as it is set up. Often you may change the bow's draw weight slightly to better fine tune the spine match to the arrows but the initial cutting should be done with the goal of matching the arrow spine to the bow as set.

This is NOT about how it looks.

You will often see target archers with arrows that are 4-6 inches longer than what they could use. This is for the same reason. It takes that length to match a really large diameter arrow, which are inherently stiff because of their diameter, to a light draw weight target bow.


By: GG NYC@Work
Posted: 23-Feb-11

I like a longer, stiff-spined arrow because I can tune it to my bow and the arrow ends up being heavier (which is what I am aiming for).


By: Purdue
Posted: 23-Feb-11

It makes more sense to me to decide on an arrow length first and then determine the spine required.

You might want a longer arrow to ensure that the broadhead clears the riser or in the case of a turkey heads even extends an inch or two beyond the bow hand.

On the other hand you may want a very short arrow because it is lighter and will be faster and have a flatter trajectory.

Just be sure to select the spine based on the arrow length and other appropriate factors.


By: elkman
Posted: 23-Feb-11

What Purdue said, I shoot a stiffer, heavier, and longer arrow then I would have to for hunting. I want the arrow wt for penetration and the broadhead in front of my hand. Ron


By: Ziek
Posted: 23-Feb-11

Draw length 28 1/2, arrow length 28 1/4.

I also agree with Purdue. You can choose arrow length first and adjust other variables to fine tune. I use a bow quiver and with many short ATA bows it doesn't make any sense to have arrows sticking out above or below the limbs. I choose a stiff shaft (FMJ 300), cut to the length I want, then adjust (add) point weight, if needed to fine tune. This gives the added advantage of heavier weight, stiffer spine and increased FOC. All advantages in increasing penetration potential. Speed is simply not a consideration with any modern compound bow, and arrow weights under 600 grs., unless you are seriously draw weight/length challenged. (less than about 60#, 26"). Even then, I wouldn't put too much emphasis on arrow speed.


By: Jimbob
Posted: 23-Feb-11

arrow length is one of the most important factors for fine tuning spine. Its much easier to cut 1/8" smaller then it is to add 10 more grains to the front. I choose an arrow I like, pick the spine, then start playing with length and head weight to get everything right.

Use an archery software program and you will see how important arrow length is, 1/2" either way can make a big difference.


By: Ziek
Posted: 23-Feb-11

I couldn't disagree more. I doubt most bowhunters could tell the difference in an inch difference in shaft length, unless they're already shooting a marginally uderspined shaft. And if you're using the HIT system, adding weight is much easier than changing length. Spine is just not very critical when shooting a release and drop away rest, unless it's underspined, for most shooters.

Now I understand from some other posts that that may not be true for Bowtech. But I prefer to shoot a higher quality bow than that. LOL


By: x-man
Posted: 23-Feb-11

Weather you match the bow to the arrow, or the arrow to the bow, I can't imagine a situation where less than 1/2" increments would be the ticket.

Most arrow selection charts have five horizontal squares in each spine at a given weight range. Stay out of the weakest box of the five to start with and it will not be too stiff. The shaft can be cut from there a half inch at a time if a weak spine reaction shows up. To this day, I have not seen an over-spined arrow not be able to tune. Not unless the shooter has some horrific hand torque that "counters" what would normally show up as a weak spine affect.


By: Straight —» Arrow
Posted: 23-Feb-11

I have a 30.5 inch draw. My arrows are 28".


By: archery95
Posted: 23-Feb-11

First thing to do is to establish your draw length.That will in the end determine your arrow length.Your draw length will change with the type of release you use or if you are a finger shooter.Your arrow length will be determined by your draw length and what type of rest you have.THEN you decide what spine and broadhead to use and everything else to get a properly tuned bow/arrow combination.


By: Spike Bull
Posted: 24-Feb-11

Well, Ziek, if you are shooting a system that does not allow you to pull the insert and adjust arrow length or even rotate the insert to get better accuracy with broadheads, you have to compensate somehow!

Obviously, you have a finished arrow in mind before you start building: length, weight, spine, fletching, wrap or not, etc. And you use the arrow software to decide what the best shaft is for the finished product you desire and you accomodate the peculiar mechanics of a particular system. (HIT inserts!)

We could get into a pissing match over how, what, and when but that is not productive.

The point here is to make sure that Pyranna and others realize that, if accuracy is important to them, they should not cut an arrow to a particular length for purely aesthetics reasons and to arbitrarily pick a length without incorporating the other important factors is foolish.


By: Pyrannah
Posted: 24-Feb-11

WOW this went totally the wrong direction, i realize they are all related, i just wanted to know how many of you shoot an arrow longer than your draw length to have the broadhead out in front of the riser.

I need a .300 spine to have my broadhead in front of my riser. They are not available in stores just online.. So I wanted to know how common a 30" arrow actually is...


By: x-man
Posted: 24-Feb-11

Now I see where you're coming from.

For every 100 dozen arrows I build and sell, at least 75 - 80 of them are shorter than the persons draw length. Containment drop aways and WB rests have allowed shooters to shorten their arrows without safety concerns.

My personal hunting arrows are at least as long as my DL, or longer.


By: Ziek
Posted: 24-Feb-11

Pyranna,

It's not necessary from a safety point of view with most rests to have the BH in front of the riser. But there's nothing wrong with it either. And with apologies, I will respond to Spike Bull.

Yes I know what I want my setup to look like ahead of time, and it's possible to get that by manipulating other variables. First, I won't shoot a real short bow. I want my arrows within the dimensions of the bow when in the bow quiver. Also, I like heavier arrows and with today's components, it's impossible to get one too heavy without serious effort. As for tuning BHs, I match them to shafts BEFORE fletching. Once I have a combination that works, care during assembly almost guarantees they will all fly the same. In the rare instance they don't, they get a FP.


By: 30CaliberHornet
Posted: 24-Feb-11

The longer your arrow, the more it weighs and the slower it will fly, and the shorter it will fly. When i have arrows done, i don't let them extend more than about an inch past my rest, thats all the length you need. I have a Ripcord off bugsnbullets.com and it works great, but my arrow still doesn't extend beyond the inch on the other side of the rest when it is up, everything else would be a waste to have.


By: Bowhunter
Posted: 25-Feb-11

I shoot a 31" arrow with a 29.5" draw length.


By: Mathews Man
Posted: 25-Feb-11

I have a 27" draw and shoot 27.5" length arrows.


By: Spike Bull
Posted: 25-Feb-11

Ziek, I can tell from your posts that you know exactly what you want and how to make it happen.

People can learn a lot from your astute study of "arrow-dynamics" my friend!


By: Dream Catcher@work
Posted: 25-Feb-11

My draw is 31.5" and arrows are 31.5". I shoot a recurve and I draw until the back of the BH hits the back of my bow! It gives me instant feelback and I know I'm at full draw!


By: wyobullshooter
Posted: 25-Feb-11

My D/L is 26 1/2". I shoot shafts that are also 26 1/2". This puts me about 2" beyond my rest.

I used to shoot 25 1/2" shafts, but by increasing length by an inch and going from 100gr tips to 125 gr, I was able to shoot a stiffer spined shaft. These changes significantly increased my finished arrow weight. Maybe not a big deal for someone with a long D/L, but can make a big difference with those with a short D/L.


By: Pyrannah
Posted: 25-Feb-11

bowhunter, what spine and arrows do you shoot? What head weight?


By: buffsnuffer
Posted: 25-Feb-11

27in. draw 27.25 arrows


By: TD
Posted: 26-Feb-11

Have to remember, AMO(?) draw length already adds 1.75" on top of length to the small part of the grip I believe? Equal DL to shaft length already puts the broadhead "almost" out in front of your hand.

Right now my bow is 28.5 and a 29" arrow puts me in my comfort zone WRT sharp blades and my bow hand. I have arrows from 29" to 30" mix and match sometimes, but all are about as stiff as you can get with standard shafts, usually needed with shafts on the longer side, 125 heads and 70lb draw. All shoot fine and tune.

If you want to shoot arrows on the long side figure on shooting shafts on the stiffer side. As with many things, stiffer is usually better....


End of Topic
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