Moultrie Products
.257 Roberts Good Deal or not?
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Contributors to this thread:
Bowbender 07-Apr-18
osage 07-Apr-18
Shuteye 07-Apr-18
JTV 07-Apr-18
WV Mountaineer 07-Apr-18
bb 07-Apr-18
spike78 07-Apr-18
JTV 07-Apr-18
Wayne Helmick 07-Apr-18
Tiger eye 07-Apr-18
Glunt@work 07-Apr-18
Bowbender 08-Apr-18
thecanadian 08-Apr-18
bad karma 08-Apr-18
Tiger eye 08-Apr-18
spike78 08-Apr-18
Griz 09-Apr-18
thecanadian 09-Apr-18
Trax 10-Apr-18
Sixby 16-Apr-18
TD 16-Apr-18
osage 16-Apr-18
Corn bore 19-Apr-18
MK111 19-Apr-18
spike78 19-Apr-18
TD 19-Apr-18
From: Bowbender
07-Apr-18
Yeah, yeah, yeah....gun topic.

Was in my local gun store and they had just received a collection and were placing some on the rack. One was Pre 64 (1947) Model 70 Winchester in .257 Roberts. Stock is in very good condition, bore looks great. Overall finish shows some wear on the barrel and receiver. They are asking $1,400.

I never make a snap purchase on guns without a little research. Thought I'd check with the group of folks whose knowledge encompasses all things worth knowing.

What say you Bowsiters.

From: osage
07-Apr-18
Probably about the right price for a pre '64 now days. Also the Roberts is a very desirable caliber, one of the best for deer and antelope. It fell out of favor when the magnum craze hit some years ago.

From: Shuteye
07-Apr-18
I gave one to my daughter for Christmas one year. It too was an old model but in excellent condition. I even gave her a couple boxes of ammo. The gun store that got the ammo for me told me to tell my daughter not to throw away the brass or box since they were valuable.

From: JTV
07-Apr-18
... the price isnt bad, a quick look shows some going for over 2K .....

07-Apr-18
Too much for me. If its showing wear, its wear whether its a pre 64 or not. Push feed actions have proven themselves time and again. So, In my mind, there is no need in buying a name or stigma. Plus 257 Roberts ammo is hard to come by

From: bb
07-Apr-18
I have a buddy who buys and sells guns, He's always on gun broker and goes to the gun shows I asked him about this gun, He looked it up and the Standard grade at 100% meaning basically out of the box unfired is worth $1625.00 The .257 Roberts caliber other than the 22 hornet and 375 H H brings the most money for the pre '64. The same gun at 80% is worth $1,050.00. The higher grades are worth more, I didn't get into those. He rattled off a lot of information fairly quickly, a lot of which I didn't understand and couldn't keep up. but one thing I did get, there were a couple of years which includes 1947 where for some reason the value was 25-30% higher.

From: spike78
07-Apr-18
Sounds like the right price but for half that you can get a nice 25/06 in a few different brands. Depends if your collecting or just hunting. 25/06 is a hell of a cartridge for deer. Wish I never sold mine for the .308.

From: JTV
07-Apr-18
the only reason to get that .257 would be to add to a collection ...

07-Apr-18
JTV is right. Spike78 ain't wrong either. It's not a good deal or a bad deal. Depends on what you want it for. It would be hard for me to pass up. I love old guns with character. I'd buy it, go shoot an antelope or deer with it and then put it up. 1st world problems I guess. I have a Winchester model 97 made in 1927 that I'm going to shoot my turkey with in a week or so then it's going on the wall with the rest. If you want it and can swing it go for it.

From: Tiger eye
07-Apr-18
As said it depends on your reason for buying. It is an excellent cartridge for deer size critters with mild recoil. Kids, women and guys that don't need to be macho like it. I certainly do.

Pre 64s are collectable as is the caliber. Not many 257s around.

Ammo will be available online or a reloader prospect. Wally World won't have it. Cabelas will if you are close to one of their stores.

In the condition it's it I wouldnt hesitate taking it afield provided it is functional.

Some folks like me just like off beat calibers in this class and this is one along with 7x57, 6.5 Swede, 7mm Waters, 6mm and .244 REM and others.

Provided your not looking to flip it and make a profit, your in the ball park.

From: Glunt@work
07-Apr-18
For function, a $700 new 6.5 Creedmoor from one of several manufacturers would be a great choice in that medium to mild recoil deer rifle category and great odds of having a phenomenal shooter.

For collector or history value its a neat gun and would be fun to admire while waiting on a buck to step out.

From: Bowbender
08-Apr-18
All:

Thanks for the input. Reasons for buying, I've been looking for a .257 Roberts for a while . Pre-64 Winchester makes it a little nicer. I'm like Tiger Eye that I have always had an affinity for "different" calibers.

Yeah, I'm aware that I could buy a new gun for half the price that does everything the Bob does, and does it better. They also have the character of a brick. I know, I have several in my safe. I like the lines of the older guns and a littler bluing wear is not going to affect functionality one wit. I have a Browning Abolt Micro Medallion in .243 that I've had for about 35 years... I can remember where each ding and scratch in the stock came from. Just something about bringing up a wood stock gun to shoulder....

From: thecanadian
08-Apr-18
For that price I would give it a pass. Pre 64 Winchester prices are hyper inflated by nostalgia of the older generations that grew up with them. Since their value is based on condition, they are relocated to being 'collector pieces', not meant to see the field. If you just want to hunt with a Bob I would suggest finding a Ruger tanger, Montana Rifle Co., custom Mauser, or it would probably still be cheaper to get a slightly used Winchester and have it rebarreled.

From: bad karma
08-Apr-18
If you like it, the price is within the ballpark. Buy it and have fun. Life is short....I'm not a fan of the pre-64 Winchesters but I'm also a lefty. If you want one, you won't regret it.

Of course, you could darn near build your own for $1400......

From: Tiger eye
08-Apr-18
"Pre 64 Winchester prices are hyper inflated by nostalgia of the older generations that grew up with them. "

This can be said for any collectable. When people are in their 20s and 30s kids, mortgage payments, college loans, eat up alot of expendable income. Once they get to be in their 40s or so to about 60 they collect things that remind them of their childhood and usually have the financial means to do so. Once they reach their 70s finances become tight again and value goes down.

Take for example a Beatles lunch box. That is of most value to those who grew up with that music and may have had one in their childhood. Current 20 and 30 year old will not identify with it and if they do aren't willing to spend money for one. Those who were adults at the time do not identify with it nor does it interest them. The object is of greatest value only to those in the niche.

The price curve holds true for most collectables with certain exceptions of course.

From: spike78
08-Apr-18
I would have to say if I were to collect guns it would be old Marlin and Winchester lever guns. Lots of cool calibers with leverguns.

From: Griz
09-Apr-18
If you really want a .257, find a used model and brand you like in .308 for a good price and ship it to ER Shaw in Pittsburgh to be rebarreled. I picked up a Ruger 77 in .308 for $325 and had Shaw put a 250/3000 barrel and it came in right around $500 total cost. Things a tack driver to boot.

From: thecanadian
09-Apr-18
Griz- that was a great deal on a Ruger! I never find deals like that. However, everyone knows that Wisconsin made barrels are the best in the world ;-)

10-Apr-18
If you like Win those Montana rifles are nice....wish they had an adjustable comb on the stock.

From: Trax
10-Apr-18
If you yourself really want this rifle then it is certainly worth it. Not necessarily as an investment maybe but for personal reasons. Great rifle no doubt. I myself have been trying to find a HK SL7 for years at a somewhat reasonable dollar. Very difficult thing to do but if I find one I'm buying it. I won't overpay but I'll pay value and I know that value is high. Just because I want one. I wanted one in the early '80's when they came out but couldn't justify it then. Wish I had.

From: Sixby
16-Apr-18
I love the 257 which is based off of the 7x57 Mauser. Its a great cartridge and a really great year and rifle. However if it is going to be a using gun I would reccomend Howa or Weatherby Vanguard at less than half the price and both are great shooters. Pretty much choose your caliber. But in that range I would personally reccomend the 25.06 and never owned one I did not love.

God bless, Steve

From: TD
16-Apr-18
By far my favorite rifle is a pre 64 in .338. My father in law and I talked all night once about the "perfect" elk rifle, we had all the ballistics books spread out on the kitchen table. A month later he showed up with it, the very rifle we decided was best of breed, for my 22nd birthday. Alot of deer and elk under it's belt. Haven't hunted a rifle but once in the last 20 years. A deer eradication hunt about 10-12 years ago. Hadn't shot it in several years, but was still on and knocked down 4 deer with 4 shots in one morning and then spent the rest of the day dealing with them...... haven't shot it since but smile every time I see it in the gun cabinet.

Used to load for it and my second favorite rifle, an older 7mm rem. 700 back in the 70s. Should have never sold that rifle. (traded it for a horse actually) It was a tack driver.

Thanks for bringing up some fond old memories.

From: osage
16-Apr-18
The .338 is a bit much for deer, but about perfect for Elk and African plains game. I should have bought one early on and nothing else.

From: Corn bore
19-Apr-18
Sold one at auction in Sioux Falls a couple days ago...over $1600.

From: MK111
19-Apr-18
338 is a great caliber. I took my Browning SS 338 to Alaska and took a decent black bear. I used my Remington Custom Shop 375 H&H on my last elk and it went down on the spot. A close friend had the Remington Custom Shop build him the 375 H&H SS as a light 7 lbs with a spring loaded recoil pad and muzzle break. Recoil with full hunting loads is less than a 30-06. Then he had 2 heart surgeries and couldn't shoot it anymore. With my 2 open heart surgeries it is no problem.

From: spike78
19-Apr-18
I chuckle when I hear about people using 300 win mags and 338s or 375s for deer hunting. My little 25/06 with no recoil made deer dead before they hit the ground.

From: TD
19-Apr-18
I used the .338 because it shot so well....... it's likely killed a few hundred ground squirrels too. =D

For the most part it damaged less meat than my .243. Bullets barely expanded before they were out the other side..... Gun fits so well it kicked less than the 7mm mag.

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