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Deer diseases- with pictures

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Messages posted to thread:
Beendare 25-Mar-10
Beendare 25-Mar-10
Beendare 25-Mar-10
Beendare 25-Mar-10
Beendare 25-Mar-10
guidermd 25-Mar-10
SDMULEY 25-Mar-10
The Old Sarge 26-Mar-10
guidermd 26-Mar-10
keith 26-Mar-10
MeatHunter 26-Mar-10
The Old Sarge 26-Mar-10
gobbler 26-Mar-10
YukonJack 26-Mar-10
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From: Beendare Date: 25-Mar-10

Beendare's embedded Photo

With Denny Crane suffering from Mad Cow it may be worth us bowhunters knowing what to look for.

Seriously, the following info was from Kansas DOW website.

Feel free to add to this database with any pertinent info- factual of course.

1st pic; Bovine tuberculosis normally occur in cattle but has been found in deer in Michigan and around a couple other outbreak sites. Deer and elk with TB may appear normal. One of the lesions hunters see are small (pea size)tan or yellow lumps on the lungs or ribs.

From: Beendare Date: 25-Mar-10

Beendare's embedded Photo

An exotic louse is causing high levels of mortality on deer in the northwest part of the United States. Deer frequently groom themselves and chew the hair from areas they can reach that have lice. This is different from the normal molt or hair that all healthy deer experience each year. Here is a picture of what the grooming looks like on a mule deer with the exotic louse.

From: Beendare Date: 25-Mar-10

Beendare's embedded Photo

Soremouth is caused by a parapox virus and is something we occasionally see in sheep and goats. It causes sores on the lips and teats of the animal and there is some indication that it may also occur in deer. We are asking hunters if they have seen anything suspcious. The condition in sheep might look like the the following.

Additional information could be found at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/orf_virus/ if you are interested.

From: Beendare Date: 25-Mar-10

Beendare's embedded Photo

Here is a guys hand that was in contact with the above soremouth

From: Beendare Date: 25-Mar-10
Again, feel free to post any CWD or other disease info here-

Nice to know what to look for...

From: guidermd Date: 25-Mar-10

guidermd's embedded Photo

this deer just had a simple skin disorder, but doesn't look too appetizing none the less, meat would be fine with this case, it merely an eipidermal issue. this young buck had over 200 of these on his body.

From: SDMULEY Date: 25-Mar-10

From: The Old Sarge Date: 26-Mar-10
Picture #1. Is it safe to eat such an animal? I know just by the looks, I wouldn't want to.

Picture #5. Is there a name for that skin condition? I'd like to do some research on it. Last hunting season one of my partners took a deer with that stuff. Not as bad as your picture but it was the first time I'd seen it in Idaho.

Thanks for the info.

The Old Sarge

From: guidermd Date: 26-Mar-10
i don't have a specific name on it sarge. the biologist gave us a name but i don't recall it. it only involved the skin though. maybe some proactive advice from jessica simpson would correct it:)

From: keith Date: 26-Mar-10
Sarge, regarding pic #1, here is what the Michigan DNR says about it:

Meat Safety While it is possible to transmit bovine TB from animals to people, the likelihood is extremely rare. It is highly unlikely that a person field-dressing or eating the cooked meat of animals infected with bovine TB would become infected. The TB bacterium is very rarely found in meat (muscle tissue). Since bovine TB is primarily spread through respiration, the bacterium is generally found in lung tissue. As a precaution, however, all meats, including hunter-harvested deer, should be thoroughly cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F for 15 seconds to kill bacteria. If the lungs, ribcage or internal organs from wild deer look abnormal (multiple tan or yellow lumps), the meat should not be eaten and the deer should be taken to a Michigan Department of Natural Resources check station.

From: MeatHunter Date: 26-Mar-10

MeatHunter's Supporting Link

Sarge- Looks like Cutaneous Fibroma to me. -Rusty

From: The Old Sarge Date: 26-Mar-10
"If the lungs, ribcage or internal organs from wild deer look abnormal (multiple tan or yellow lumps), the meat should not be eaten and the deer should be taken to a Michigan Department of Natural Resources check station."

Thank God! It seems I'm not alone in my revultion. lol

Thanks everyone.

The Old Sarge

From: gobbler Date: 26-Mar-10
If I kill an abnormal deer I have to drive it all the way to Michigan?

From: YukonJack Date: 26-Mar-10
"If I kill an abnormal deer I have to drive it all the way to Michigan?"

LOL!


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Subject: RE: Deer diseases- with pictures

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