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Bows That Hold Value



By: Coastie John
Posted: 24-May-09

I'm thinking of getting a new bow. I have looked at BowTech's, Hoyt's, Mathew's and APA Innovations. I'm looking for opinions on which ones tend to hold their value longer. Cruising EBay to get an idea of what things are running, there are alot of these bows for sale except for APA. I only seen one of those on EBay and it was an older one. I have heard very positive things with the APA Black Mamba and they have some excellent built in features, I'm just not sure about how well they hold their value.

Thoughts on any of these???


By: kota-man
Posted: 24-May-09

Thoughts: The computer you typed this on holds its "value" about as well as a bow.

My experience is that a Mathews will bring a little more money on ebay, but hold its value...NO


By: midwest
Posted: 25-May-09

Not worth putting in the bow buying equation.


By: Redman
Posted: 25-May-09

I get a new bow every year and the best resale value is Mathews, I have tried to sell Hoyts and Bowtech's and had alot less return.


By: HuntinHabit
Posted: 25-May-09

Recurves and longbows hold a decent value, even all their value, but compounds seem to die off quickly after about 3 years.


By: BWBOW
Posted: 25-May-09

BLackwidows are good at holding value, their "x" series are the best. 75% resale after a 2 or 3 years.


By: IaHawkeye
Posted: 25-May-09

Black Widow,Schafer, etc. recurves and Shrew and Grifin, etc., long bows hold their value much better then machine made compounds. *(I'm not putting down compounds at all,) just stating a fact!!!


By: Coastie John
Posted: 25-May-09

Good points about the recurves and longbows. Maybe the craftsmanship is a factor.

Of the 4 we're talking about, on EBay there seems to be a few more Mathews for sale than any other bow. Not sure why that is....maybe more of them out there? I'd say BowTech is next, followed by Hoyt. I only seen the one APA.


By: pirogue
Posted: 25-May-09

loprofile hit the nail on the head. Kinda like baseball cards: the more that are made, the less the value. And each year brings plenty more.


By: JERSEY BOB
Posted: 25-May-09

Unless it's a curio item (like a '70's Bear, Pearson, Browning, etc. in pristine condition) forget it.


By: LKH
Posted: 26-May-09

I've got Harrison longbows that are worth more than I paid for them.


By: Coastie John
Posted: 26-May-09

This is comparable to trucks. They all depreciate some but a Ford F-150 might hold it's value better than a Chevy or Dodge. That is the jest of the query. Ford might be like Mathews...good trucks and alot of them out there.


By: SERBIANSHARK
Posted: 26-May-09

Of all the makers of compound bows...Mathews holds their price value the best. Largest following i think is the reson.

AT has PSE'S Like crazy for sale right now.


By: Spike Bull
Posted: 26-May-09

I agree strongly that this is not worth putting into your buying criteria. Get a real good bow that fits you well.

It seems that Mathews hold their value a little better but this is a mystery to me. They will not honor the warranty except to the original buyer and never when you modify the bow. Putting a really good string on it is considered modifying it and voids the warranty. I don't think much of their best strings never mind the lesser ones. This should devalue used bows somewhat. Other companies write this into their warranties but in reality they actually will honor the warranty for any owner, first or not.


By: kellyharris
Posted: 27-May-09

they all depreciate about as fast as buying a new volkswagon


By: Snag
Posted: 27-May-09

All things that are replaced with "new models" because of technology devalue. That's why you see some wood recurves and longbows selling for more today than when they were made... they are collectiables.


By: cbeard64
Posted: 27-May-09

Right or wrong it is absolutely clear to me that Mathews bows hold their value MUCH better than any other compound bow. I have been extensively shopping for a used Mathews Switchback XT and they almost always sell for in excess of $450-most go for over $500. And that is for a bow that is several models back.The newer ones sell for more and even a 10 year old Mathews will bring a good price.

The other guys' bows sell for much lower $$$ or don't sell at all. I assume this is because Mathews has such a large and loyal following.

(Can't speak for traditional bows because I don't have experience with them....)


By: MeadeCreek1
Posted: 27-May-09

I just traded in my Mathews Switchback (2005 Model) on a DXT and the store gave me $400 for the Switchback, which was pleasantly more than I expected


By: mission man
Posted: 27-May-09

Mathews


By: Burt
Posted: 27-May-09

Congratulations on finding a relatively fresh topic. I have a feeling that most of us don't trade in or up often enough to think about resale value.


By: BuckeyeBuck
Posted: 28-May-09

Resale, on an item that is out-of-date by the time it hits the show room floor? Ha,Ha, you got to be kidding! You got to pay for that engineer designing next years arrow lauching device on a computer that will shoot 2fps faster than last years model. Thank you for injecting your hard earned money into the economy,hopefully it wasn't made in China.


By: Coastie John
Posted: 29-May-09

Buckeye....funny you mention that part about being made in China. I was researching duties and tariffs on bows coming across the border in the HTS (Harmonzed Tariff Schedule) and found this note in the fine print. Take it for what it's worth.....

NY F83923 March 13, 2000 CLA-2-95:RR:NC:2:224 F83923 CATEGORY: Classification TARIFF NO.: 9506.99.0510 Stephen Riner Stephen Riner, Inc.

648 Winter Hill Circle Fenton, MO 63026 RE: The tariff classification of aluminum pieces (“forgings”), used for archery bows, from China.

Dear Mr. Riner:

In your letter dated February 24, 2000, you requested a tariff classification ruling.

You are requesting the tariff classification on aluminum pieces (“forgings”) that are used as the main components for archery bows. The pieces are approximately 22 inches in length, 3 to 4 inches in thickness and 1 to 2 inches in width. The pieces are constructed of aluminum material that is identified as Aluminum 2014. The pieces are approximately four pounds in weight. There are detailed illustrations included with the ruling request, in lieu of actual samples.

The applicable subheading for the aluminum pieces (“forgings”) used for archery bows will be 9506.99.0510, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), which provides for “Archery articles and equipment and parts and accessories thereof…Bows and bow parts.” The rate of duty will be free. This ruling is being issued under the provisions of Part 177 of the Customs Regulations (19 C.F.R. 177).

A copy of the ruling or the control number indicated above should be provided with the entry documents filed at the time this merchandise is imported. If you have any questions regarding the ruling, contact National Import Specialist Tom McKenna at 212-637-7015.

Sincerely, Robert B. Swierupski Director, National Commodity Specialist Division


By: Coastie John
Posted: 29-May-09

Buckeye....funny you mention that part about being made in China. I was researching duties and tariffs on bows coming across the border in the HTS (Harmonzed Tariff Schedule) and found this note in the fine print. Take it for what it's worth.....

NY F83923 March 13, 2000 CLA-2-95:RR:NC:2:224 F83923 CATEGORY: Classification TARIFF NO.: 9506.99.0510 Stephen Riner Stephen Riner, Inc.

648 Winter Hill Circle Fenton, MO 63026 RE: The tariff classification of aluminum pieces (“forgings”), used for archery bows, from China.

Dear Mr. Riner:

In your letter dated February 24, 2000, you requested a tariff classification ruling.

You are requesting the tariff classification on aluminum pieces (“forgings”) that are used as the main components for archery bows. The pieces are approximately 22 inches in length, 3 to 4 inches in thickness and 1 to 2 inches in width. The pieces are constructed of aluminum material that is identified as Aluminum 2014. The pieces are approximately four pounds in weight. There are detailed illustrations included with the ruling request, in lieu of actual samples.

The applicable subheading for the aluminum pieces (“forgings”) used for archery bows will be 9506.99.0510, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), which provides for “Archery articles and equipment and parts and accessories thereof…Bows and bow parts.” The rate of duty will be free. This ruling is being issued under the provisions of Part 177 of the Customs Regulations (19 C.F.R. 177).

A copy of the ruling or the control number indicated above should be provided with the entry documents filed at the time this merchandise is imported. If you have any questions regarding the ruling, contact National Import Specialist Tom McKenna at 212-637-7015.

Sincerely, Robert B. Swierupski Director, National Commodity Specialist Division


By: BuckeyeBuck
Posted: 29-May-09

Coastie,I said that hoping it wasn't true. Oh well, I guess just about everything we buy nowadays is made buy someone other than an American. No wonder there is very little value in anything after the initial purchase.


By: Coastie John
Posted: 29-May-09

Ya...I don't know if all 2014 aluminum comes from there but it appears some does. I was a little surprised to see that. It makes ya wonder about the accuracy of "Made In America".


By: B4LITE
Posted: 02-Jun-09

Bear recurves, most trads all have gone up.


By: Spike Bull
Posted: 02-Jun-09

Were those solid billets of aluminum to be machined here or already machined from billets forged in China?

Bowtech has developed some extensive machining capabilities specifically to have more control over the manufacturing processes. This stuff is probably going to some small manufacturer who cannot afford to do his own.


By: archer
Posted: 03-Jun-09

I bought a Bear recurve 30 yrs. ago for $65.00. Sold it last week for almost double. How many Matthews, Hoyt, Bowtech, etc. could beat that?


By: zipper
Posted: 04-Jun-09

Any bow Fred Bear used.


By: SERBIANSHARK
Posted: 04-Jun-09

"I bought a Bear recurve 30 yrs. ago for $65.00. Sold it last week for almost double. How many Matthews, Hoyt, Bowtech, etc. could beat that? "

Fair enough, but if you bought a bear kodiak mag recurve today for $439.00. Wait a year, and see THAT same bow for sale on e-bay, or AT for $200-$250.

Black widow bows hold value best for mass produced recurves.


By: jhelton
Posted: 04-Jun-09

The way most bows lose value, you might as well buy a bow that works for you and shoot it 4-5 years and then if you want a new one, just keep the old one for a back up. Either that or find a kid to give it to who wants to get into archery. There aint a hill of beans difference in the technology of a bow made today and 4 years ago. Most of the Mathews have used the same cams year after year until this new Monster came out for example. Bout the only thing different is ATA length and brace height. I shot my buddies 2005 Switchback the other day against a DXT and the SB actually felt better on the shot with about the same amount of gizmos on it.

True some of the new binary cams are a newer technology, but have yet to prove they are any "better" than a bow made 3-4 years ago.

J


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