Four JS Outfitters
Idaho, solo, ultralight
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
bohuntr 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Forager 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Hornseeker 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
browndog 26-Sep-08
Z Barebow 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Dirty D 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Forager 26-Sep-08
Ken 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
sharpstick 26-Sep-08
Ermine 26-Sep-08
BullCrazy 26-Sep-08
Hunts_with_stick 26-Sep-08
Hollywood 26-Sep-08
Brock-ID 26-Sep-08
midwest 26-Sep-08
stealthycat 26-Sep-08
HuntinHabit 26-Sep-08
Redman2003 26-Sep-08
BluegrassHammer 26-Sep-08
Steve Jo 26-Sep-08
Flix 26-Sep-08
Matt 26-Sep-08
Heat 26-Sep-08
John Scifres 26-Sep-08
John Scifres 26-Sep-08
elmer 26-Sep-08
denny 26-Sep-08
danno 26-Sep-08
Bowme2 27-Sep-08
Watts 27-Sep-08
nijimasu 27-Sep-08
elmer 27-Sep-08
midwest 27-Sep-08
DJ 27-Sep-08
'Ike' 27-Sep-08
Hollywood 28-Sep-08
Scoot 28-Sep-08
Kurare 28-Sep-08
Tocs 28-Sep-08
CA Bowhunter 28-Sep-08
Ladybowme 28-Sep-08
playin' hookey 29-Sep-08
Flix 29-Sep-08
Steve Jo 02-Oct-08
Steve Jo 02-Oct-08
Steve Jo 02-Oct-08
Steve Jo 02-Oct-08
Z Barebow 02-Oct-08
Owl 02-Oct-08
tom stapf 02-Oct-08
rooster 02-Oct-08
Flix 05-Oct-08
buglemaster 05-Oct-08
DWP 05-Oct-08
DWP 05-Oct-08
Horn Donkey 06-Oct-08
Hollywood 06-Oct-08
TD 06-Oct-08
midwest 06-Oct-08
DonVathome 07-Oct-08
Snag 07-Oct-08
Steve Jo 08-Oct-08
bohuntr 08-Oct-08
Gator 08-Oct-08
BullCrazy 09-Oct-08
Bridgewater 09-Oct-08
BobB257 09-Oct-08
lugnut 09-Oct-08
Ben Nicholson 09-Oct-08
Steve Jo 10-Oct-08
BullCrazy 10-Oct-08
TTS in PA 07-Dec-08
Ki-Ke 18-Dec-08
hunting1 18-Dec-08
Les Welch 01-Jul-09
midwest@work 01-Jul-09
sharpstick 02-Jul-09
mn_archer 02-Jul-09
Steve Jo @ Work 02-Jul-09
bjibber 02-Jul-09
ORION 02-Jul-09
sharpstick 02-Jul-09
Steve Jo @ Work 02-Jul-09
sharpstick 02-Jul-09
Steve Jo @ Work 02-Jul-09
bambklr 03-Jul-09
Jeep 03-Jul-09
Steve Jo @ Work 03-Jul-09
GregE 03-Jul-09
TxTrapper 03-Jul-09
Coach 03-Jul-09
Les Welch 06-Jul-09
Steve Jo @ Work 06-Jul-09
Jeep 06-Jul-09
LostInTheWoods 21-Aug-09
Les Welch 21-Aug-09
GregE 04-Aug-11
jordanatwork 04-Aug-11
bullnbow 09-Aug-11
tradorion 09-Aug-11
gametracker 09-Aug-11
BoonROTO 09-Aug-11
midwest 31-Jul-14
Z Barebow 31-Jul-14
TREESTANDWOLF 31-Jul-14
bnt40 01-Aug-14
Elkaddict 01-Aug-14
midwest 01-Aug-14
JLS 01-Aug-14
LaGriz 01-Aug-14
Owl 01-Aug-14
Rick M 01-Aug-14
JLS 01-Aug-14
buzz mc 01-Aug-14
huntmaster 01-Aug-14
elkmtngear 01-Aug-14
bigbulls6 01-Aug-14
Mark Watkins 01-Aug-14
fisherick 02-Aug-14
TurkeyBowMaster 02-Aug-14
midwest 02-Aug-14
orionsbrother 07-Oct-16
NvaGvUp 09-Dec-16
bigbulls6 18-Dec-16
razorhead 19-Dec-16
From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08
My Idaho elk hunt started in Washington, where I live. I had 2 weeks off and the guys I would be driving over to Idaho with were not going to be able to go over until Thursday of the following week. I got off work friday and decided to go shake down gear in a wilderness area I had not been to in 6 years.

It was a pretty good Hike in, my elk tag was good for cow or spike only.

As I came into the area I thought I had walked into a Primos video and was pretty upset that there were so many other hunters already in what I considered to be a fairly remote area bugling all over the place at 3:30 in the afternoon.

Rediculous...

There were at least 5 different bugles and some of them were pretty bad. I was sure these idiots were chasing all the elk right out of the country. Hopefully Idaho would not be the same.

My dissapointment turned to disbelief as I saw 1 then another and another bull elk. These weren't hunters, they were all elk!

I spent the next 5 days getting rediculously close to shooter bulls and trying to connect on a cow.

Connecting on a cow did not happen, but this novice hunter learned a tremendous amount in those short days about being a backcountry elk hunter.

I've never seriously pursued elk, for whatever reason something always got in the way. White tail deer hunting, racing ATV's whatever. And now, for 5 days, I was a rabid dog chasing elk in one rugged drainage after another.

On wednesday morning I had my final opportunity and failed to capitolize. It was 11am, I was 7 miles from the truck, It was a 3 hour drive home, I still had to wash all my gear and pack for Idaho which I was leaving for the following morning.

I set a brisk pace, jogging when I could and chastizing myself for starting this elk pursuit at 39 instead of 20 years earlier! I made it to the truck in just over 2 hours and raced home.

I has hardened, Focused, Driven. Idaho was going to be interesting

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
One problem I had to solve was the issue of calling. I had it in my mind that elk were pretty much harrassed and over called and I did not even bother to carry a call with me in washington. Still hunting instead. That fallacy was completely laid to rest and I was dumbfounded at the level of vocalization I witnessed in those 5 days. On my way home I stopped by sportsman's Wharehouse and raced in, grabbing a grunt tube and 2 diaphram calls.

I dont know the first thing about calling, dont know how to do it, But I had been among them for 5 days and sleepless nights with elk bugling all over the place. I figgured I could learn.

I got about 30 minutes of practice at home before my girlfriend put a stop to it claiming possible eviction if I kept it up.

I had perfected my 'sound' to somewhat resemble either an excited bull, or a cat getting it's tail stepped on. It would have to work.

I was driving over with 2 other hunters, splitting expenses. I was packed and at their house Thursday morning. The drive over was long if uneventful.

we got in VERY late thursday night and grabbed a hotel. A way too leisurly morning, then drove to the jump in area arriving late in the afternoon.

They eleceted to hunt within a short radius from the vehicle.

I had not been in this country before, but had some great 7.5 minute maps. I drew a 4 mile radius from the nearest road access and picked the next ridge outside of that circle.

It was not a bad hike in, Im guessing 6 trail miles. I arrived at the ridge and made my way out along it. Noting increasing elk sign the further I got from the main trail system.

2 miles in and light was failing fast. I'd marked several wallows and elk sign was fairly fresh.

I decided to try my cat scream bugle... you know, just to practice.

I let one out and listened in the growing darkness. A smile creased my face as a distant tone pierced the night from below. The bull was a good mile out, but he answered me. The first time I had ever bugled in elk country adn I got a response! I made camp in the dark with High expectations.

On the walk in the weather was hot and dry, in the 70's, Noaa weather radio was calling for a severe shift with rain imminent.

I set up my tarp and went to bed. I woke to intense rain at 5am. I made breakfast and waited for it to slow down which it did about an hour later. I got my gear on and made my way out.

My first intention was to survey the area a little closer and find a better area to set up a more permanent camp.

That task was set aside when I heard a bugle below me.

The morning was spent in the pursuit of two bulls I chased all over the Northern slope of the ridge, eventually getting winded by one from long distance and running out of time on the other as he quit calling around 11am.

I quit as well. I was soaked and hungry as I headed back to camp.

My camp was really too deep in. There was elk sign everywhere and I probably needed to back out of the country a good mile to keep from pressuring them by simply camping where I was.

I scouted my back trail for a better camping location, one with an adequate water supply. This took until about 2pm.

On my way back to camp I looked into a rather nasty bowl to the east. It was really deep, cliffs, rugged, ugly... I knew there were elk in there.

I got to camp, made some lunch. It was too late to move tonight. I would back camp out first thing after the morning hunt.

I left out at 4pm. I was moving North, intending to pursue the bulls I had been on the morning. The wind was absolutely horrible for hunting that area. It was blowing hard out of the SE and I would be hunting to the North West.

I mulled in my mind how best to get on those animals, drop below and come around from the downwind side? That could take several hours just to get into position. As I worked through the problem I found myself as the rim of the aforementioned nasty hole.

Man, it was ugly...

I let a scream fly. First one, then two bugles carried in on the wind.

They were on the opposing ridge, a good mile out.

I looked down. It was easily 1500 feet to the bottom and treacherous to say the least.

I hesitated all of 5 seconds before scrambling down the wooded and rocky slope.

I called about every 2 minutes in my decent, marking that one of the bulls was matching me. We were on a collision course for the bottom. About half way down I looked accross the valley and could make him out. Still about 750 yards away, demolishing a tree. He was hot and looked to be a good bull.

This picture is a view from where I came down

From: bohuntr
26-Sep-08
Cool story keep it comin!!!

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08
My decent was a bit on the hairy side. I was excited, and I had to temper that with some caution. I was alone out here and in some really rugged country. I reached the heavily wooded bottom a bit scratched up, but none the worse for wear.

The wind in the bottom was wrong. It was blowing up valley. A bugle about 400 yards away confirmed that the hot bull was coming into the creek bottom directly down wind of me.

I hurridly snuck my way about 200 yds downwind, sidehilling the creek bottom in hopes of getting upwind before calling again.

I heard a brief chuckle about 100 yards upwind. I jumped to a copse of trees feeling confident that I had cut the wind to my favor on the bull.

I let out a scream and and about jumped out my skin!

In mid bugle the Bull cut me off from 15 YARDS BEHIND ME!

He was right on the other side of the trees I was standing in!

He came crashing in, I didn't even have an arrow knocked!!

I dropped the bugle and slapped an arrow on the string coming to full draw as he appeared 10 yards away and directly down wind...

He winded me and bolted at the same time I released.

The 4 blade stinger from recurve took him too far back and high. The arrow had angled forward and I noted with some relief that before he had covered 10 yards his entire flank was covered in bright blood.

I was dumbfounded...

In shock...

My heart was pounding as I heard him crashing through deadfall and debris in his flight.

I came to, gave a sharp scream and chuckle and heard him stop. Then I heard what I thought was the sound of antler on rock... it was distant, maybe a 150 yards. I couldnt be sure.

Alternately excited and completely morose over the hit, I replayed everything in my mind as I developed a plan on what to do next.

I did not want to push him. I was sure the hit was mortal, but I did not want to loose meat waiting overnight. Then the rain started.

I looked at my GPS. It was 5:11pm. And hour till sundown.

I decided to stalk the bloodtrail. I would allow a half hour then let the blood sign I noted dictate my next move.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
First blood...

The arrow had buried to the fletch and I had excellent blood on the right side of the trail (entry) and dark red blood in smaller qty on the left side of the trail Complete penetration. It was looking good, but I did not want to get ahead of myself.

I made slow silent progress.

I found my arrow at about the 100 yard mark. Bright red blood covered the shaft. No funky smell. More than likely an aorta hit and possibly liver

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08
I crept along, alternately scanning forward along the trail with my binoculars and then looking with excruciating detail at the sign left on the ground. Hoof prints, broken limbs, blood... the blood was running out. I was coming to a very tough decision

I eased forward from last blood. 5 yards, 10 yards, nothing...

I sat still, searching silently in the fading light for a spec of blood that would justify me staying on this trail. Some sign that would mean my marginal hit had proven fatal.

I looked up and scanned ahead through the thick brush.

Something caught my eye and I put binoclars on it.

About 40 yards ahead was a patch of elk hair... then I saw a piece of antler.

he was down.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Emotion I cant describe. Disbelief, awe, gratitude... I was overwhelmed.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
A truly magnificent animal

From: Forager
26-Sep-08
The author of this thread is a real inspiration.... he's also the guy who showed up to crew NvGvUp in is 50miler this past summer.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
And because someone upstairs has a pretty good sense of humor...

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
So now the work begins

I've never taken apart an animal as large as an elk. Several deer and bear, but the size of an elk... wow

I had my small pocket knife, a 6" folding boner and a piece of sharpening ceramic. I figured it would be enough.

After pictures I got to work. It was 6:30 and the lights were going out.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Rope proved to be a second pair of hands. I had taken a look at the gutless method and decided this would be a good time to try it for myself. As well as boning an animal which I hadnt in the past needed to do.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
The little skinning knife was more than adequate, and the 3 oz boning knife was indispensible as I fumbled my way through the process.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Right side complete

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
I wrapped up with the job at 11:30pm

The meat was hung in a handy deadfall in 4 bags. I would carry 2 bags out (6 total bags) I removed the head with the small skinning blade and bagged that as well. I wanted to do an english skull mount.

A picture of the remaining 4 bags and the head

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
I hunt with my pack frame on, it carried all my processing equipment and basic survival stuff.

My first load ready to carry the 2 miles back to camp.

Guessing a good 70 - 75 pounds

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08
The route out that night was bad. It was wet, slick, dark, steep and the way was blocked by a maze of cliffs and I was carrying a heavy load after a long hard day

I had my headlamp, a 7.5 minute map and a GPS.

My progress was slow and deliberate. Referencing GPS coordinates when I could get a lock in the deep hole to my map and then picking a course up.

several dead ends and I thought several times that I would need to decend back to the valley floor and build a fire to sit out the night.

The temps were in the high 30's. Very survivable, but uncomfortable. I tempered my desire to get back to my camp with the need for extreme caution in the trecherous environment.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Another dead end, the way blocked by cliffs.

Back track and try another route

I finally made my way out of the maze and back to camp at 1am.

Rough night. I got to sleep in the next monrning \

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08
I awoke the next morning to a dusting of snow.

It was really getting cold. My sleeping system was at the edge of its limit. I was already sleeping in all my clothing, including rain gear.

I moved camp in the morning and ferried the first load of meat. Getting a mile closer to the trail system and set up in a more protected area.

I set off for my next load. I had reached my hunting partners on the rhino radio. They were making their way to my new camp

From: Hornseeker
26-Sep-08
Dude...Awesome story! Great Pics! Thank You!

Ernie

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
I got to the kill site, everything was as it should be. I loaded up with the head and hind quarter.

3 bags left hanging. This load was heavier than the first. Guessing in the 100 + range

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
I found a much better access route and made it back to camp without incident in two hours.

I fleshed out the skull knocking off an easy 20 pounds that I could have left down in the bowl.

I built a fire to dry out. It was cold / wet.

From: browndog
26-Sep-08
Fantastic read and a big congrats to you. Thanks for sharing.

From: Z Barebow
26-Sep-08
Steve Jo

The duct tape came in handy! OUCH!

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
The next morning I was occupied with camp chores. NOAA said a new system was moving in. I gathered wood and cleared a spot for my hunting partner's tarp.

They arrived at 2pm Monday. My intent was to help them get their camp set up and then go gather the last load while showing them the area and hopefully getting them on animal of their own. There were good numbers of animals.

However, that changed when they got to my camp. They were beat, demoralized. They hadnt seen an animal, the country was MUCH rougher and the weather intolerable.

In the first 5 minutes after their arrival they broached the subject of leaving the next morning!

It started to snow

At 4pm it became clear that they were done. No amount of pep talk could change their minds. They were not even interested in hunting that evening a mile from camp!

I needed to get the remaining meat out of the hole asap.

I set off at 4:30 in 2 inches of snow.

The last load out was heavy. a rear quarter, front shoulder and rib / neck meat. Almost half the animal.

I made it back to camp after dark. The snow had stopped, it was clear and cold.

I had pulled the animal 2 miles and 1500' up to camp in 3 loads. I was cooked.

Temps that night fell into the teens. I boiled water and put it in my platypus water bottle and went to bed wearing all my clothing including rain gear. I think next year I'll take a sleeping bag!

the next morning we loaded up for the 6 mile pack out.

I took the rib meat off my pack and carried the Rear quarter and front shoulder to the truck. 97 pounds weighed on my bow scale...

The other two took a hind quarter a shoulder and neck meat between them.

We got back to camp in the dark and left the next morning with the final bag / head and camp on my back.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08

Steve Jo's embedded Photo
Steve Jo's embedded Photo
5 days of packing meat, Next year I think I will put a horse packer on retainer. That is rough on the body.

Final load at the truck.

From: Dirty D
26-Sep-08
Awesome story and pics. Congrats on your first elk!

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08
An awesome trip.

My feet are hamburger... there is this quartz like sand... basically ground glass, the duct tape did not offer much protection from it and it really chewed my feet up. Maybe some gators next year.

I am absolutely hooked on elk hunting!

From: Forager
26-Sep-08
Joe:

I think you mean "gaitors".

Come to think of it, you're such a fearless maniac, maybe to do mean gators. :-)

From: Ken
26-Sep-08
Very,very good story.

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08
Some gear details:

I shoot a 60 pound DAS with WINEX limbs.

My pack for 5 days with 2 liters of water was 33 pounds. It is a MOLLE frame with suspension from REI and load straps I made myself. I hunted with it and shot my elk while wearing it. my gear was straped to the frame in sea to summit dry bags. I also wear a hunting vest that has my binocs, hydration bladder and gear do dads. This vest with binocs, and a liter of water is 6 pounds

Food was stuff I make myself, basically fortified oatmeal (protein, granola, fruit and nuts added)this was both breakfast and dinner. For lunch I had a sesame snap and cliff shot goo.

I wore trail running shoes for both trips and had no problems with my feet except for the abrasions from the glass like sand.

I carry a SPOT messenger and Rhino 530 as a safety precaution.

From: sharpstick
26-Sep-08
Great story. That is the way hunting is supposed to be...deep in the wilderness, hard work and good friends.

Sharpstick

From: Ermine
26-Sep-08
Nice. Thats how it is done!

From: BullCrazy
26-Sep-08
Dude, that was killer, I love when a story is told with such detail and events leading up to the kill, I felt like I was right along side of you the whole way. As a serious elk bowhunter myself I understood every emotion you described, thanks so much for sharing, and congratulations on a well deserved elk.

Also, the picture next to the fire with the feet taped up with duck tape is absolutely classic, been there and done that myself a few times. It pretty much sums up what bowhunting for elk in the Rocky Mountains is, it is brutal on the body at times, but the rewards are undescribable. The funny thing about your story is I have several bowhunting friends that sound just like your buddies, and after a few trips with me they have all but given up going backcountry elk hunting with me, it became too much of a challenge to keep their spirits up when the going got tough. Their loss in my opinion. If you ever need a partner to pack in deep you just let me know.

26-Sep-08
Great job, that is awesome and hopefully me next year!

From: Hollywood
26-Sep-08
great hunt, great info, great all around.

congrats on your first bull.

From: Brock-ID
26-Sep-08
Awesome trip, I like how you took the photos along the way. Congratulations on a great bull also. Thanks for sharing!

From: midwest
26-Sep-08
Excellent story, Steve Jo, and congrats on the hard won elk!

How 'bout a little more detail on your shelter/sleeping arangement.

From: stealthycat
26-Sep-08
that's the way it should be done BRAVO!

From: HuntinHabit
26-Sep-08
Excellent. Way to go Steve. Great story, congrats on the bull.

From: Redman2003
26-Sep-08
Wow great story.

While I comend your toughness and thank you for sharing your story......I am the only one thinking....better you than me....I probally be with you buddies? Not even a sleeping bag?

Redman2003

26-Sep-08
Awesome, just awesome!

From: Steve Jo
26-Sep-08
Wow, thanks guys! You are all an inspiration and your comments are just awesome.

Spent all day yesterday cutting and wrapping meat. 6 straight days of handling that bull. They are huge animals. Im positively spent. Going to go get the skull bleached now and then take the next 2 days to recuperate before going back to work.

My sleeping system for this trip was a ul 180 quilt. It's probably rated for 65 degrees, in your living room, watching TV and you are too lazy or cheap to get up and turn up the heat. If you throw this quilt on you will not die of hypothermia during half time of the football game you are watching...

It weighs less than a pound.

Big agnes full length air core uninsulated. (I think 15 ounces but would have to check)

Vapr lite bivy. 6 ounces

Total system is about 2.75 pounds, but if it rains you need the 8x10 sil nylon tarp pictured

Given the conditions I slept in all my clothes in temps down to the teens.

Micro light Smart wool long underwear top and bottom. Medium weight smart wool top

smart wool light ankle socks

Smart wool Beanie

Mountain hard wear wind blocker fleece jacket

Montbell UL therma Wrap Jacket (awesome)

The 1 balclava

Marmot Precip pants and jacket

The clothes were all worn at one point or another during the trip so there was synergy in wearing them for sleeping.

However, I was generally cold, or at least very concerned about conditions versus my sleeping system and took great pains to keep clothing I would eventually be sleeping in dried out.

Given that I only carried my full pack until I got into elk sign and then set up a relatively permanent camp, I think I will be getting a better bag. Probably a WM zero degree. The extra weight will offset more than enough pita activity like boiling water for your platypus so you can get 5 hours of sleep without freezing to death.

I did it. It can be done. Might not be the most practical.

Ultralight is a means to an end there are no bonus points for being a minimalist.

From: Flix
26-Sep-08
Steve that is an awesome story. I'm glad your hard work was rewarded! I'm glad that "Fish & Bone" knife worked out for you. You sure gave it a workout! Shoot me an email when you get a chance.

-- FLIX

From: Matt
26-Sep-08
"Fish & Bone"

Probably a better descripter than '6" folding boner', eh? ;-)

From: Heat
26-Sep-08
Nobody can say you did things the easy way that's for sure! Congratulations man, that is one of the coolest story's with pics to go with it that I've seen on this site. Way to go on your first bull as well. It don't get much better than that man!

Nick

From: John Scifres
26-Sep-08
Wow. I am so glad you shared that. I hit the warm stuff in Idaho. I left last Saturday morning when the crap was moving in. At least it got the elk talking. We had several come in quiet but only one bugler. We were 407 miles from a trailhead almost all the time. We did bump a spike 500 yards from the road though :)

Great hunt. Great story!

From: John Scifres
26-Sep-08
That should say 4 to 7 miles, not 407.

From: elmer
26-Sep-08
awesome story dude. The extra 2 lbs of a sleeping bag will be well worth it next time as you found out.

I enjoyed your adventure. hope to do something like it in the future, but include horses for my old body!

From: denny
26-Sep-08
Congratulations Steve, great story and picks and a nice bull. Denny in Sequim

From: danno
26-Sep-08
Western Mountaineering makes great sleeping bags. I would encourage you to buy a down bag with a waterproof exterior. It's as much for peace of mind as anything. It's lighter than adding a bivy bag. I went with the 15 degree bag...at 2 pounds it's a lot of warmth for the weight. I also use a siltarp, but sewed it into a lean-to shelter that is held up by my hiking sticks. This setup was primarily for sheep hunting, but works great for elk bivy hunts.

Great hunt. I've been unable to hunt this year, as I was unemployed for a year and just started working again. By next year I'll have vacation (and the savings account) built back up, so I'll put in for tags in several western states, now that I'm living in the West.

From: Bowme2
27-Sep-08
Steve... thats as good as it gets! I've read a lot of stories and blow by blow hunts, but partner that right there is book or magazine worthy.

Thanks for taking us along with your descriptions and pictures as well.

Lastly, Congrats to you on something that takes more guts, desire, and will power than most have or want to put forward!

Great read!

Rick

From: Watts
27-Sep-08
Congratulations, Steve! Now THAT is a great elk hunting story. It had all the elements that make a hunt unforgettable --to you and others who read it.

Interesting what you did with that pack frame. I'm looking at modifying a Mystery ranch frame to accept a Catquiver to reduce weight on my set up. I've been using a Eberelestock but feel there's alot of weight to them that really doesn't need to be there. How uch does that pack-frame of yours weigh bare nekid?

Again, congratulations! Awesome story!

Watts

From: nijimasu
27-Sep-08
great story. I can't believe I got to read it for free!

good luck on future hunts!

From: elmer
27-Sep-08
when you do starat looking into a good sleeping bag, check out the Marmot helium. 15 degree bag. it's an awesome bag.

From: midwest
27-Sep-08
I've read this story three times now - simply awesome! (has that adjective been used enough in this thread yet?)

From: DJ
27-Sep-08
And some people wonder why anyone would shoot a calf, heh heh. Solo meat packing is so much more physically and mentally demanding than the hunting.

Congrats and thanks for sharing the great story, Steve!

From: 'Ike'
27-Sep-08
Damn gald Bowme2 told me to check this out...You're my hero! Great story and hunt, congrats!

From: Hollywood
28-Sep-08
great story and pics.

If you're "right-side complete" pic is accurate, you might want to attend a rib-roll seminar, otherwise you're 100%.

congrats again, Don.

From: Scoot
28-Sep-08
Awesome!

From: Kurare
28-Sep-08
This is a fantastic story! I yelled "yeah!" when you found your bull. You have readers in Europe too:)

Janez

From: Tocs
28-Sep-08
Congratulations! A great and inspiring story.

From: CA Bowhunter
28-Sep-08
Great job Steve Jo thank for sharing your story.

From: Ladybowme
28-Sep-08
OMG.. Awesome story! I'm glad my hubby told me to read this one.

Well whats next? We will all be ready to follow your next adventure.

Congrats and thank you for sharing with us.

Lana

29-Sep-08
Joe, you really should submit that story and those excellent photos to a hunting magazine. I would suggest Bowhunter or Traditional Bowhunter Magazine. Dwight Schu, editor of Bowhunter, recently wrote an editorial laying out their criteria for publishing articles and he emphasized the importance of having good photos as well as a good story, and you certainly have both. I really enjoyed reading about your hunt, and I'm sure one of the magazines would pay to publish it. Thanks for sharing it with us.

From: Flix
29-Sep-08
Joe, you're a wild man! To quote Bill Murray in Stripes, "I wanna party with you!"

-- FLIX

From: Steve Jo
02-Oct-08
Man, I need to figure out how not to work for the man for a living... My fist week back after spending 2 weeks essentially alone in the woods talking only to the elk (and myself) has me positively swamped and quite apathetic to spurious 'fires' that 3 weeks ago had me lying awake at night and the devotion of my full attention.

The season ended 2 days ago and I already made a comprehensive spreadsheet for washington's harvest data compared angainst special tag draw quotas, permit applicants, etc etc, for all species... Next year's application plan for washington is already complete. Looking at Idaho, Oregon, Montana, and Colorado as well. Would like to hit 3 states

I wanted to thank all of you for your comments. Im definitely no expert though. I got called 'Crazy' by 7 people out there in Idaho. I only met 7 people, and 2 of them were my hunting partners!

From: Steve Jo
02-Oct-08
>>Steve that is an awesome story. I'm glad your hard work was rewarded! I'm glad that "Fish & Bone" knife worked out for you. You sure gave it a workout! Shoot me an email when you get a chance.

-- FLIX <<

Shot you a PM John, Hey I live in Federal Way now. Dont have your email except the general one at Huntflix.com

Shoot me a PM response or you can reach me at joe_rarey@yahoo.com

Take care

From: Steve Jo
02-Oct-08
>>when you do starat looking into a good sleeping bag, check out the Marmot helium. 15 degree bag. it's an awesome bag<<

Thanks Elmer, research has taken me to WM Hilite and the Montbell superstretch stuff. Both are rated less than those you mentioned, but I sleep pretty warm anyway. I think they are rated at 35. The WM is 1 pound (same as my quilt) and the Montbell is 20ounces (I think)

Sleeping bags are tough piece of gear to settle on and I think it just comes down to, A fella probably needs a couple...

From: Steve Jo
02-Oct-08
>>If you're "right-side complete" pic is accurate, you might want to attend a rib-roll seminar, otherwise you're 100%.

congrats again, Don. <<

See. this is where my inexperience shines through. I've never boned an animal. And never worked on an animal as large as an elk and never tried the gutless boning method.

So three pretty big strikes against me and it looks like I screwed it up.

Right side is definitely "done" in that pic. I have to confess that on the ribs I just filleted (sp?) as large of a hunk of the rib meat as I could and did not spend near the time on that section as I did with the other parts of the animal. Kinda faked my way through it, and it shows.

I DID get 248 pounds of meat back to the house, but would be interested in pointers on doing a better job here.

I checked the local community college and boning 101 is no longer offered... in fact, the receptionist HUNG UP ON ME!

RUDE! :)

From: Z Barebow
02-Oct-08
Steve Jo

Maybe since they are a college, I think she was insulted because you should have taken boning 101 in high school as a prerequesite.

The college only offers advanced boning!

LOL!

From: Owl
02-Oct-08
Nice encounter, Steve Jo. Thanks for taking us along on the ride.

From: tom stapf
02-Oct-08
Best elk hunt story I've seen! I felt like I was with you.

Congratulations, you truly earned and deserved that bull!

From: rooster
02-Oct-08
Great story and very well told! Congratulations on your success. MO

From: Flix
05-Oct-08
Email inbound. Federal Way, huh? Have you found anywhere in the area to shoot?

Adding a lightweight down bag AND a good insulating pad will only add a couple of pounds to your pack and should assist you in getting better rest.

Let me know if you find a packer you can have on speed dial!!!

-- FLIX

From: buglemaster
05-Oct-08
You de Man Steve Jo!Great story & pics. Agree with the above posts, you should send that story in to get it in a mag.Sounds to me like Cameron Haines just might have met his match!Nice Job!!!

From: DWP
05-Oct-08
Hey just got the Montbell UL SS Down Hugger #1 Long. It is a 15 degree bag and I got it while I was away on my elk hunt. I have not used it yet, but will get to on late elk/deer. I went w/ this bag because I have had a couple of semi-mummy styles and I don.t sleep well in them. I like to hike one of my legs up and sleep on my side so no bag that I tried allowed me to do this... until the Montbell SS. I have slept inside w/ it and it stretches a ton allowing me to sleep soundly. I too sleep very warm, so I might have went w/ too much bag, but I would rather carry 5 oz. extra to be sure. It compresses way small. I will have more to say after I use it in some E Washington late hunts.

From: DWP
05-Oct-08
Forgot to add that the benefits of the Montbell Super Stretch line get negated by all but the largest bivy bags. Sleeping bag can only stretch as far as bivy bag allows.

From: Horn Donkey
06-Oct-08
A lot of folks talk about elk hunting on this site...I guarantee you that there are a very very elite few who have done something like this. I know I couldn't. Hearty congrats on an adventure I wish I had the guts to take. What a story.

From: Hollywood
06-Oct-08
"See. this is where my inexperience shines through. I've never boned an animal. And never worked on an animal as large as an elk and never tried the gutless boning method.

So three pretty big strikes against me and it looks like I screwed it up."

Dude!

You're definitely not a screw-up! And it does not look bad! There are life-long highly experienced hunters that don't know the rib-roll and they leave that meat on every animal they kill. It's simple in theory, but you have to see someone do it and then the light-bulb goes on, like "Bones" in the "Spock's Brain" episode,

"...even a child could do it!"

It's the single most valuable little trick I teach people. However, it's not conducive to verbal explanation and I can't line it out as a cut by the numbers technique. If I can videotape it before the end of the season, I'll send you copy.

Believe me dude, your hunt was a great achievement and an inspiration. You'll receive no harsh condemnation from me! You've just demonstrated what a motivated individual is capable of.

Congratulations again, Don.

From: TD
06-Oct-08
Great story Steve! I really enjoyed it. Thank you. And that was one well earned elk!

My only comment is where were your buddies on all this? Were they out of contact range? Did you just want to pack it all out on your own? I'm confused.

#2 rule in our camp is someone puts something on the ground it's all hands on deck to get it out. (#1 rule is all common expenses are shared equally. No "But you ate more than I did!" whining.) Pretty much no other serious hunting until it's out. Period. And no one bails out early unless it is a true emergency. But then #3 is we all get equal shares of meat too, so there is a bit of incentive.

Congrats! Well deserved!

From: midwest
06-Oct-08
"My only comment is where were your buddies on all this? Were they out of contact range? Did you just want to pack it all out on your own? I'm confused."

That part of the story, where you cleared a site for your buddy's tarp, then they showed up and were ready to call it quits - didn't even want to do a hunt that evening - yet they wouldn't even go with you to help pack out that last load? That part of the story really stuck in my craw. THOSE kind of hunting buddies I don't need. Unless I missread the story.

From: DonVathome
07-Oct-08
Holly cow! I am going to go home and hug my sleeping bag. You are tough!

Well earned, good story and pics, congrat's!

From: Snag
07-Oct-08
You did it "old-school" Steve. Good job. There are many that wouldn't have followed their dream...your friends are some...and now you are rewarded by the hard work in a way that is beyond words. The outfitter to haul meat out isn't a bad idea though! For the cost in that kind of area it is worth it! I bet that meat tastes pretty darned good! As for that receptionist, heck, she's probably a veggie head and thought you must be joking!

From: Steve Jo
08-Oct-08
You guys are amazing!

I had to go get an extra large hat because my head swelled up so much!

Don, get that video up and rolling, I would love to see the technique. I cruised through all of the boning with the exception of the ribs and neck.

... gotta be a better way :)

As for my hunting partners. I dont want to throw them under the bus. They are good guys, they were just not prepared, mentally or physically.

We split up from the truck, they were about 5 miles from me on day two and I was unable to reach them on the rhino until about noon the day after I got my Bull (got the bull sat, reached them about noon on sunday)

They made their way to my camp, but they did not make it until the following day. (Monday)

I had one load left in the hole (it was very cold so meat spoilage was not an issue) actually, it was 3 bags, Hind quarter, Front shoulder and all the rib and neck meat.

I was waiting for them to get in to take them down to go hunting and on the way out we could each grab a bag and head back to camp.

When they reached my camp it was snowing and they were D O N E. They had covered a lot of miles, seen no elk. Lost a spotting scope and spent 5 hours retracing steps to find it. Just a bad luck trip for them. They wanted nothing to do with going down in that hole.

I was pretty concerned that they were gonna hoof it out the next morning and decided I really needed to get all the meat at least to camp that night.

So I went down for the final 3 bags. I dont know that I would have realistically considered that a "Load" under normal circumstances...

The hind quarter weighed 58 pounds on my digital bow scale at home. The front shoulder was 32 pounds and the neck and rib meat was 29

119 pounds 2 miles and from the map about 1200 feet vertical. Felt like I was giving a 15 year old a piggy back ride.

The frustrating part for me was that I kicked up two bulls going in. And on the way out... the snow is coming down pretty hard and I look up, and there is a bull elk, a 5x5 at 35 yards. Just standing there looking at me.

then he just walked by me.

It was amazing.

I think ultimately I was frustrated at my partners. I had a different trip than they did. I dont know if they even believed me when I staggered in to camp after dark and told them what I had seen.

I will say, that the next morning they carried a hind quarter and front shoulder and the neck meat to the truck between them. I got out the hind quarter and the front shoulder. Not a rough trail but 6 miles to the truck under load and 6 miles back. Then the next morning I packed the head and my camp and split the 40 pound loin back strap bag with the younger of the two and we walked out.

They earned their share of that meat. Just dont think this type of hunting is their thing.

Thanks again for all the comments, really great stuff very much appreciated. :)

From: bohuntr
08-Oct-08
Holy crap Steve that was a hunt!!! Congratulations and thanks for sharing!!!

From: Gator
08-Oct-08
Excellent story, congratulations.

From: BullCrazy
09-Oct-08
Steve, once again congratulations on a well deserved bull. I am curious though, how did you go about researching the unit since you had never been there before? You said you had some great maps and drew the radius of where you hunted, but how did you go about picking the unit that you did? I have hunted elk in Idaho for many years and after my remote area was overrun the past couple years with hunters I think I am going to start looking into another unit. I am not asking for specific units or anything like that, just curious how you were able to narrow down the unit so quickly and am wondering if I am missing something here. It took me years to find areas where I consistantly got into elk and after the past couple years a lot of my hard work went down the tubes with tons more pressure.

From: Bridgewater
09-Oct-08
Congratulations That was an excelent hunt and story. I think I can understand your buddies as my son went with me for 5 years before he was able to draw down on a bull. He was so frustrated the day before he got his bull that he was really down. Stated that he had hunted hard and put in 20 or more miles and had seen no elk or sign. It is my experience that 10% of the elk territory hold 90% of the elk and it is usually the roughest/steepest area around. I hope your buddies get themselves in shape the next time they go with you. That to me is the secret to your success and the fact you went the extra mile. IE; steepest/roughest area.

From: BobB257
09-Oct-08

BobB257's Link
Steve, what a story. I am flying to the west coast tomorrow AM and will look down and think of the huge job you got done, just hauling that bad boy back to the road. What an adventure, and the things a boys dreams are made of. I will have my 9 year old son read this when I get back. If you want a great link to meat cutting go to the site listed. I dont think it has the rib roll but a ton of good info just the same. Again thank you for sharing and letting us be a party to the great elk adventure. Bob

From: lugnut
09-Oct-08
This looks like northern Idaho! In fact it looks like an area I hunted last year! My friend who was supposed to help pack my meat got a job so I didn't dare shoot one in the hole but did bugle several bulls in! In fact I ran from the last two because I thought I might lose control and shoot one of them! Congratulations if that is the same area you did indeed work your butt off!

09-Oct-08
Awesome! Thanks for sharing your hunt!

From: Steve Jo
10-Oct-08
Picking the area - I guess I get lucky with this. I like wilderness areas because I like to get away from crowds. no roads, no wheeled vehicles. You still get a lot of horse camps but most people are trail walkers...

So I looked up all the wilderness areas in idaho, then I compared that against OTC tags

Once I had that narrowed down I got on google earth and spent about 4 days pouring over the terrain.

Finally settled on an area.

Bought my tag

Went to sportsman's warehouse and looked at the TOPO! National Geographic Kiosk and studied the topo map at 7.5 minute detail (this was the day before I went I got to the hunting area)

At that point (3rd week of the season) I wasnt looking for elk habitat. I was looking for areas that people would not go into.

I was only in there 1 1/2 days and saw or was calling in 8 different bulls.

Definitely lucky, but the math is sound. If it had been earlier in the season I would have looked at different factors, but it was pretty easy to locate on the map where people were not going to be a presence. After 3 weeks, the Elk had found that place.

From: BullCrazy
10-Oct-08
Very nice, thanks for the response. I guess you pretty much followed the same routine I have over the years, I guess I wanted to reassure myself that I wasn't missing something.

I think I've narrowed down the unit I want to hunt next year. Some of the terrain is very nasty like your area, but it just goes to show from your example those are the areas that elk love and people hate, which is exactly what I want. It really comes down to staying in shape and not being afraid to dive in to the nasty stuff when the opportunity is there. Hopefully it will pay off like it did for you this year. Thanks again.

From: TTS in PA
07-Dec-08
Inspirational.

Gives me hope for my rookie trip planned for 09'.

Well done.

From: Ki-Ke
18-Dec-08
Fantastic story! Whatever inexperience you CLAIM to have elk hunting, you obviously make up for in wilderness experience. Cool adventure.

Thanks

From: hunting1
18-Dec-08
You are the man! I wish I had that kind of drive!

From: Les Welch
01-Jul-09
ttt for a great read, it's coming quick. Thanks Steve

From: midwest@work
01-Jul-09
One of my favorite threads!

From: sharpstick
02-Jul-09
Steve Jo,

How much does your pack weigh empty? I have been toying with the same type of system but wonder what it would be like for weight.

Any info would be great.

Sharpstick

From: mn_archer
02-Jul-09
Yikes!

What did I get myself into? lol

michael

02-Jul-09
The frame and REI mars belt are just over 4 pounds. Thats with all the webbing and dry sacks

Thanks for the compliments guys. It's getting close to that time of year :)

From: bjibber
02-Jul-09
Pretty inspirational Steve. Keep your notes and a few more hunts like that and you will have a draft of a book. If you haven't yet check out Cameron Haines book on backcountry hunting. He does the exact same type of hunting in OR. His book has been an inspiration to me as has your story. I'm pretty pumped for my Wilderness bowhunts I have for this year. I have an amazing OTC wilderness deer area with no hunters but we do not have very many wilderness OTC elk areas here in utah. I look forward to checking out wilderness type elk hunts in the surrounding states in the future.

From: ORION
02-Jul-09
I'm sure others would agree that, you've inspired some of us to new levels of commitment!!! Excellent write-up and pictures. Best of luck in your future hunts (although, I doubt you need luck!!!) Orion

From: sharpstick
02-Jul-09
Thanks Steve Jo,

What type of harness did you buy at REI and did you have to modify it at all to fit the MOLLE frame?

PS. I am glad someone brought this thread up again as i was just about to buy a Backpacking Light UL 60 Quilt and then I reread your thread and saw you used the 180 and got cold...

Sharpstick

02-Jul-09
Hi Sharp Stick I used a lightly modified Mars Suspension set

I didn't 'get cold' in that UL 180, I froze my a$$ off... :)

I have the WM hi lite this year Ive selpt it down to low teens with no issues, was actually kinda comfy

From: sharpstick
02-Jul-09
Thanks for the info Steve...I read your thread last year and forgot about the quilt, glad someone brought it up again before i bought one and froze my arss off. I imagine you have a 180 for sale real cheap???

Sharpstick

02-Jul-09
I still use it as a summer bag.

I have a 15^ Mountain hardware specter that is very warm. Just under 3 pounds. Just never want to carry it. Not the weight so much as the room it takes up.

The WM is a SMALL package :)

From: bambklr
03-Jul-09
This was the best adventure I have read. You really made it happen. congrats

From: Jeep
03-Jul-09
Mrs. Steve Jo here... the lucky son-of-a-gun that actually gets to go elk hunting with this guy in a short 8 weeks!! Had the time of my life hunting whitetail with him last year... but, elk is gonna be on a whole new level!

You make me proud, "Steve"... ;) Incredibly excited for this season!!

03-Jul-09

Steve Jo @ Work's embedded Photo
Steve Jo @ Work's embedded Photo
you are not being cute honey... :)

Saying that you are a "lucky SON-ofa-gun" implies the incorrect gender...

I can assure everyone that 'Jeep' is a gurl. And a pretty decent hunter in her own right.

From: GregE
03-Jul-09
Now that's just TOO Cool!! Good luck to the two of you. I'm guessing you may have solved your tent heating problem.

Bandaid won't be hunting this year as she just had surgery on her shoulder= but we are planning to climb around the MT Bitteroots at the end of September.

From: TxTrapper
03-Jul-09
......I can assure everyone that 'Jeep' is a gurl. And a pretty decent hunter in her own right.......

Now Steve why would you think we would think anything other :0) Hahahahahahahahhahahah!!!!!

From: Coach
03-Jul-09
Great story! Thanks for sharing!

From: Les Welch
06-Jul-09
"I'm guessing you may have solved your tent heating problem"

Laughed my butt off, when I read that!

Best of luck to both of you! I have been wondering what you were going to do for a partner this year. Sounds like you are pretty good friends with your partners from last year....but unfortunately you found out the hard way, friends don't always have the same drive.

Can't wait to read this years adventure.

Heading to Idaho this year for the same type of hunt myself, can't wait!

06-Jul-09
LOL that is pretty awesome. She actually has her own camping system. Scratching my head on that one.

Jeep and I blanked on special draws this year. We will be chasing cows and spikes together in early september (WASHINGTON)

Im hunting with Nvagvup and Mn_archer in Eastern Idaho in late september.

November will be NE WA Whitetail in the rut, like the one posted above.

And then early december, Jeep, Forager and I will be chasing some Island bucks on a special draw.

Gonna be a busy year. and tons of fun.

:)

From: Jeep
06-Jul-09
LOL, nice...

Going to be an insane year!! And today marks the beginning of training for all of it... :D

21-Aug-09
This was a good story! This season is going to be off the chain! Thanks for all your imput so far Steve.

From: Les Welch
21-Aug-09
ttt

From: GregE
04-Aug-11
this great story needs a bump for those of us planning for this year.

G

From: jordanatwork
04-Aug-11
Thanks Greg! Hope all is well on Sage Creek Forums for you.

Steve Jo is THE ultra light maniac....hands down. Quite an inspiration. Nice to see his first hunt again. I just don't have the cajones to go that light...I need my blankie(s)!!! LOL

About time to break out BB's photo journal from a few years back if its still around to be found......

From: bullnbow
09-Aug-11
Steve Jo, do you have any other hunt stories like this one on here? i would really really love to read them:)

From: tradorion
09-Aug-11
DAYUMMMMMM!!! Now that just ROCKS!!

Awesome read there Steve Jo... Really enjoyed it and the gear thoughts.

As for the "tent heating" issue- sorry but if you have separate accomodations that is our own fault LOL

If you were one of my friends I'd tease you about how you "outkicked your coverage" when you caught her but since I don't know you I won't razz you like that ;-)

From: gametracker
09-Aug-11
Great read, great pics. Thanks GregE for resurrecting this story

From: BoonROTO
09-Aug-11
Great thread!

From: midwest
31-Jul-14
Had to bring this one back up to read in between otcWill's posts. One of my favorite threads of all time. I sure wish Steve Jo was still participating here....always enjoyed his stories and posts.

From: Z Barebow
31-Jul-14
+ 1 Nick. This story and Steve Jo are bad ass.

31-Jul-14
Wow!! What an adventure, thx Nick for pushing it back up.

From: bnt40
01-Aug-14
Awesome! I can't believe I missed this the first time around.

From: Elkaddict
01-Aug-14
Nick, what happened to Steve?

From: midwest
01-Aug-14
No idea, Les. Don't hear from him or Forager anymore.

From: JLS
01-Aug-14
One of the all time great Bowsite threads.

Thanks for resurrecting this one.

From: LaGriz
01-Aug-14
Steve Jo,

Your story telling is first rate. I shoot a recurve and love to here stories of any Trad-bow success. Your will and drive are by far your biggest weapons. Will look for feature posts of you and "Jeep's" adventures. Fearless solo hunting is how I would describe the style of your hunt. I feel like a under achiever by comparison. Maybe this season I will draw from your story and reach down deep at one of those tough moments!Truly inspiring and compelling story!

LaGriz

From: Owl
01-Aug-14
There are posters and there are CONTRIBUTORS. SteveJo is one of the latter. I really like that dude's bearing.

From: Rick M
01-Aug-14
I remember this thread when it first hit. Anybody know what happened to Steve Jo??

From: JLS
01-Aug-14
Last time I heard from him he was getting married to Jeep and expecting a kid.

From: buzz mc
01-Aug-14
This was a classic, I'm glad to see it brought back up

From: huntmaster
01-Aug-14
First I've seen this thread and it was a great read.

Hope they are doing well.

From: elkmtngear
01-Aug-14
Speechless!

So inspiring! Thanks for resurrecting this one, Nick!

Best of Luck, Jeff

From: bigbulls6
01-Aug-14
Great Hunt!!

From: Mark Watkins
01-Aug-14
Very real....nicely done! Update on you and Jeep?

Mark

From: fisherick
02-Aug-14
What a great adventure hunt, really enjoy reading the story again.

02-Aug-14
This really was a well written thread...hard to believe tharr hasn't been another. Maybe he hasn't been successful since. Maybe he was expecting something in return for the effort. Who knows, but it is definantly a good pattern to follow.

From: midwest
02-Aug-14
Steve Jo has shared several hard core hunts on here. The guy is a real minimalist and has balls of steel. He did that hunt with nothing much more than a simple tarp, a quilt, and the clothes on his back.

07-Oct-16
TTT upon recommendation

From: NvaGvUp
09-Dec-16
This is the guy so many of you have helped so generously the past two days.

It really drives home how devastating PTSD can be and how much it can change a man's life.

There's still time to donate, guys. Just go to the link and give 'til it hurts!

https://www.gofundme.com/help-the-rareys-battle-ptsd#

Kyle

Thank you, Midwest, for resurrecting this great story!

Kyle

From: bigbulls6
18-Dec-16
Great hunt and story thank you for sharing!!

From: razorhead
19-Dec-16
THIS IS THE BEST POST OF THE YEAR,,,,, THANKS FOR SHARING

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