Carbon Express Arrows
Moose VS ELK
Moose
Contributors to this thread:
cityhunter 16-Dec-14
Blakes 16-Dec-14
Shiras 16-Dec-14
Rick M 16-Dec-14
Zim1 16-Dec-14
Ziek 16-Dec-14
pav 16-Dec-14
t-roy 16-Dec-14
cityhunter 16-Dec-14
Medicinemann 16-Dec-14
Julius K 16-Dec-14
MathewsMan 16-Dec-14
cityhunter 16-Dec-14
Allheart 16-Dec-14
Surfbow 16-Dec-14
South Farm 16-Dec-14
cityhunter 16-Dec-14
8point 16-Dec-14
mn_archer 16-Dec-14
Jack Harris 16-Dec-14
Neveragainwagun 16-Dec-14
Genesis 16-Dec-14
Straight Shooter 16-Dec-14
dallsheepstkr 16-Dec-14
Halibutman 16-Dec-14
Halibutman 16-Dec-14
Halibutman 16-Dec-14
Halibutman 16-Dec-14
Rick M 16-Dec-14
IdyllwildArcher 16-Dec-14
Shiras 16-Dec-14
blg 16-Dec-14
elmer@laptop 16-Dec-14
Milo 16-Dec-14
Mule Power 16-Dec-14
cityhunter 16-Dec-14
Stekewood 16-Dec-14
Stekewood 16-Dec-14
Willieboat 16-Dec-14
cityhunter 16-Dec-14
bsbowhunter 16-Dec-14
mixed bag 16-Dec-14
cityhunter 16-Dec-14
Z Barebow 16-Dec-14
NoWiser 16-Dec-14
Mule Power 16-Dec-14
t-roy 16-Dec-14
Straight Shooter 16-Dec-14
standswittaknife 17-Dec-14
Herdbull 17-Dec-14
Herdbull 17-Dec-14
Halibutman 17-Dec-14
cnelk 17-Dec-14
Mule Power 17-Dec-14
Herdbull 17-Dec-14
Herdbull 17-Dec-14
Straight Shooter 17-Dec-14
Tatonka 17-Dec-14
Halibutman 17-Dec-14
Halibutman 17-Dec-14
NY Bowman 17-Dec-14
sbschindler 18-Dec-14
Milo 19-Dec-14
petemc 19-Dec-14
Rick M 19-Dec-14
cityhunter 19-Dec-14
sbschindler 19-Dec-14
Mule Power 19-Dec-14
sbschindler 19-Dec-14
Mule Power 19-Dec-14
Rick M 20-Dec-14
DonVathome 26-Dec-14
willliamtell 26-Dec-14
cityhunter 26-Dec-14
Halibutman 26-Dec-14
'Ike' (Phone) 03-Sep-15
Mule Power 04-Sep-15
ki-ke 04-Sep-15
Mad_Angler 04-Sep-15
Beendare 04-Sep-15
dlpassthru 04-Sep-15
mixed bag 04-Sep-15
deerman406 04-Sep-15
From: cityhunter
16-Dec-14
Moose VS Elk !!!!! Ok the question I have is how much more work is it once a Moose is killed vs a Elk ? The hunt will be unguided and take place in AK . Who on this site has taken both species while hunting alone .

From: Blakes
16-Dec-14
Elk are BIG, moose are HUGE! If you are packing it on your back there is a considerable difference. I have done both and hope to never have to pack either of them on my back again. Each 1/4 is probably about 30-40% larger on a moose. Just a guess. I'm sure there are a bunch of guys that can tell you closer.

From: Shiras
16-Dec-14
I've packed elk alone, but always had others with me for moose. If you are doing it alone I think you can probably count on 15 trips for the moose. Be careful about where you shoot him. 3 of us hauled whole moose quarters from 3 bulls on our trip in September with the longest haul being half a mile. Doesn't sound like much, but with 120lbs on your back while walking on a sponge it is.

Some things to think about. The packing doesn't even start until you have got the bull dressed. That is a feat with 2 or 3 people. With a 100+ lb pack how are you going to get it on your shoulders and stand up? We were not allowed to take the meat off the quarters so the biggest bull quarters were around 120lbs for the hinds and 100 for the fronts. Cape was 80ish?

It can be done solo, but you better be strong in the back, body and head.

From: Rick M
16-Dec-14
Louis,

You can do it. Take a rope and pulley to help butcher. Take trekking poles as well. Rear quarters are heavy 120 plus lbs. but I carried 4 of them in 2 days. You will need 6-7 trips. Tundra is tough to walk in but not impossible. You may need to use a rope to stand up as well.

If you are patient you should not be more than a mile from your airstrip.

Wish I could go again but it is not in the cards for a few years.

From: Zim1
16-Dec-14
I've taken mature bulls of both species solo several times, but had mules and a skidder come in to get the moose. I would not try packing a moose solo anywhere. But that's just me. I'm 55.

From: Ziek
16-Dec-14

Ziek's embedded Photo
Ziek's embedded Photo
Even a Shiras' bull is a LOT bigger than an elk. My Colorado Shiras' quarters each weighed 75# for the front and 94# for the rear. These are actual weights after we got it out, without the lower leg. I took the cape, head and antlers out as one piece. The estimated weight of that was 120#. Fortunately, we didn't have very far to go. Still, I could barely get up with that load, and we had a STEEP hill to climb. Of course, you can always do more knife work, and more trips with less weight.

From: pav
16-Dec-14
I was fortunate on my Shiras bull. Had some unexpected help show up. The plan was to pack him out solo, but once I saw him on the ground....very thankful for the help. That's one BIG animal...even when compared to an elk.

From: t-roy
16-Dec-14
Hopefully Herdbull will chime in on this.

I've packed out a couple of mature bull elk out solo but not a moose. Two of us packed my bull moose out this fall. I'll take the elk any day! I wouldn't want to imagine doing the moose solo, but I probably could have. Might have taken me 3 days!

Just butchering it is a job. Like Rick M said, getting stood up could be a challenge in itself. Does the unit you are hunting require you to leave the bones in or can you debone the quarters?

One other suggestion... Don't shoot him in the water;>)

Good luck!

From: cityhunter
16-Dec-14
Shiras 120lb is a lot good question how am i going to get up with a loaded back easy ,stand up :> Rick good suggestion Ive never worked on a moose kill but elk alone can also be a chore . I will heed your suggestions ! I might have to weight train for this hunt !!

From: Medicinemann
16-Dec-14
Lou,

How much do you weigh these days?

From: Julius K
16-Dec-14
Have hunted moose a few times here in Maine... Getting em out is much different than what you are undertaking....

One thing that is applicable: Killing them where they are standing in the mud can be a big pain... trying get their legs to break the suction is a chore!

From: MathewsMan
16-Dec-14
Just think how far you would want to move 15 80# bags of cement mix out in the bush to your pickup spot. Doing it alone, there is a good half day just getting it skinned and quartered up.

An AL bull moose would be similar to having 3 cow elk down in the same spot.

From: cityhunter
16-Dec-14
Jake it depends before morning coffee or after !!! 180 Jake i have trouble putting on the pounds after a elk hunt about 170 I drop weight fast

From: Allheart
16-Dec-14
Like everyone said Moose are big. I'm 32 and would love to tackle one on my own LOL just to say I did it and prove that it could be done. Major props to the guys that have done it solo.

I did the gutless method on a bull this fall and man those rear legs weigh a lot. It was a chore to lift them up and carry them 20 feet to where we could get the ATV to.

My biggest concern would be spoilage cause its just going to take a long time to get it done. It can be done as others have said but it will be very hard and it will take awhile.

From: Surfbow
16-Dec-14
Wow Ziek, nice Shiras! Is there a person under all that bone and cape in the pic?

From: South Farm
16-Dec-14
Put it this way, elk take HOURS to cut up and pack out; Moose take DAYS.

From: cityhunter
16-Dec-14
MathewsMan what you described is my Job !!!!I figured about a half day working on the bull !

From: 8point
16-Dec-14
killed a 50" bull in Ak back in the 70's. My neighbor a butcher returned 814# of cut & wrapped meat if that's any indication.........

From: mn_archer
16-Dec-14
ive shot many elk and one Alaskan moose all on my own. elk are easy to handle and the moose was as well when you really get down to it. on the moose I just worked my way down. got the topside quartered and bagged then rolled it and did the same.

now that said, mine died in a great spot. I wasn't prepared if he was in a bad spot such as a creek or anything like that but I was hunting a long ways from anything like that.

if I was doing it again I might at least bring a small block and tackle to at least aid in hanging the quarters above a bears head.

michael

From: Jack Harris
16-Dec-14
ok maybe DIY moose is not for me :)

GUIDED Moose - most definitely. My herniated discs just flared up looking at Ziek's pic!

16-Dec-14
ohhhh man are you in for a good time!! ha ha ive done it in north bc. those moose are considered 'canadian moose' and are a bit smaller that 'yukon alaska' sub species. have a good stiff pack frame. i like to put quarters on with the leg faceing down 'barrel hitched' around the bone. some guys like to debone but imo theres several benifits to leaving it. after the quarter is on the frame you can stand it against a tree to shoulder it. everytime you take a break be glad the leg bone is still in, that way you can take the weight off your shoulders without dumping the pack & repeating. have a saw that you can saw out the skullcap with. when you finally get back to camp 110% pooched be glad your just 4 knots away from hanging quarters. if you do this you will never forget it. i cant overstate being in excellent condition before your committed to this mission. once its on the ground your all in. best of luck to you.

From: Genesis
16-Dec-14
Try packing a moose with 3 buddies before planning a solo hunt.....

The first AK moose I ever straddled I was looking for the wheels to take off first....my buddy said you have to peel the lattice work back first.

AK Moose is to an elk like a caribou is to a coues.....almost :)

A friend of a friend was killed by a grizz last year while in the Yukon working a moose he just shot.the grizz attacked too quickly for the guide to respond.....

Solo? I'd rather grizz hunt solo than work a moose solo in grizz country...

16-Dec-14
Louis, As Rick said we killed 2 moose on our trip and he packed all 4 hind quarters. That was the most strategic planning on the hunt for me! Lol

If alone, a rope like Rick mentioned is a must, also trekking poles will pay off big. I would suggest you stay within 1/2 mile of airstrip and hunt in either direction. I took my elk solo a couple years back, as long as your are mentally prepared and take your time you'll be fine. It's a bigger job, and will require more trips than an elk, but there shouldn't be any reason to rush it.

One other thing, if you can take a partner that won't realize that he's packing the hind quarters, well I'm just saying......

Good luck,

DJ

16-Dec-14
Never killed an elk but lots of moose. I grew up in Alaska. Solo hunt a bit.I am way bigger than average and the last moose I killed took 4 trips. If you can not dead lift 250 pounds easily you will want a friend. Believe me it is a grueling work out. Try putting on a 100 pound pack and walk 3 to 4 miles several times a week, should help get you into shape a little. Good luck.

From: Halibutman
16-Dec-14

Halibutman's embedded Photo
Halibutman's embedded Photo
There is no comparison between an elk and a moose. The one thing they both have in common is the mental fortitude required to tackle one all by yourself. If you take your time, it comes down to determination.

I have killed, butchered, and packed an entire Alaskan bull single-handedly. It was a true endurance test. The task was intimidating. It was never impossible.

I used forked sticks I sawed on site to help prop up legs for skinning. I think trekking poles will break/bend. Maybe not. Sticks are free. Trekking poles are not.

Go for it.

From: Halibutman
16-Dec-14

Halibutman's embedded Photo
Halibutman's embedded Photo

From: Halibutman
16-Dec-14

Halibutman's embedded Photo
Halibutman's embedded Photo
Always more fun with a couple of friends along....

These pictures came from a hunt I got to go along on this past September. Great hunt with great guys. Solid team.

From: Halibutman
16-Dec-14

Halibutman's embedded Photo
Halibutman's embedded Photo

From: Rick M
16-Dec-14
Dj,

I am that sucker born every minute:) Gladly do it again!!!

16-Dec-14
Sounds like a great problem to have.

From: Shiras
16-Dec-14
We use a PVC pipe saw for cutting bone. Rips through them in pretty fast order. I've helped do 6 moose now and we've gotten pretty good. My brother shot his moose at about 9:30 AM. We got pictures, broke down and packed out in time for supper and a quick evening hunt.

From: blg
16-Dec-14
I have done both solo, only one bull elk though. The elk was a piece of cake, as much to do with the good footing as anything. Carrying a moose 1/4 over most of the moosey areas in Ak would make for an excellent wilderness challenge! Have fun and good hunting...

From: elmer@laptop
16-Dec-14
City...... I have taken quite a few moose here in Alaska, and have hauled them out solo 4 times. It's not easy...yes a chore.....longest I have hauled is 1-1/4 miles. Smallest was a fork horn, largest was a 64.inch bull. Like has been said trekking poles will help, though I have never used them. I have always used a 6 foot pair of shooting sticks. The sticks or poles will help you stand up with heavy loads. Also, remember to haul the heaviest loads out first and the lightest last.

Also, remember to pace yourself with your load hauling and remember to both eat and drink. Forgetting to do that will severely limit how much and how far you can haul the meat and not kill yourself.

To keep grizz/brown bear away me and my friends always leave a small transistor radio playing at the kill site as well as a small lantern. In 28 years of hunting here in grizz countries we have never had a grizz/brownie get our meat.

Also, make lots of noise as you approach the meat after hiking out a load. I usually kind of yell hey bear, stay away, you don't want my meat, or sometimes start singing quite loud. The one time I did have a grizz/brownie near I yelled, sang while I worked on the dead moose, and when approaching the meat I clapped hands, hit my shooting/hiking sticks on trees, and just made noise. That bear stayed at about 150 yards the whole time. I watched and it finally went to the gut pile about 2 hours after I had taken the radio and lantern away.

Hauling the moose out is tough, but if you are in any decent shape at all, it is doable with only a little discomfort!!!!!! Don't be too worried about doing it solo.........although having a friend or 2 along makes it much more enjoyable and beats you up less!!

From: Milo
16-Dec-14
The only redeeming fact about packing a moose is that we actually have oxygen in the air.

From: Mule Power
16-Dec-14
Mixedbag did you see that 2nd pic from Halibutman?

Jesus!

If you kill one of those bastages in the water I'll be watching from shore!!!!!!!!

Wait... on 2nd thought I guess that shoe could be on the other foot. One for all and all for one! :-)

Good luck City. What are your hunt dates? No September elk this year?

From: cityhunter
16-Dec-14
Halibutman is that a MR crew pack

From: Stekewood
16-Dec-14

Stekewood's embedded Photo
Stekewood's embedded Photo
I've killed both while on DIY hunts but have always had a buddy there to help. If you don't have to pack the moose too far to where it can get picked up it's not horrible. In some areas the meat has to stay on the bone which makes it that much heavier, but I would still rather pack super heavy loads a short distance than heavy loads a long way! Here is a moose quarter in AK.

From: Stekewood
16-Dec-14

Stekewood's embedded Photo
Stekewood's embedded Photo
We were able to pack this bull to a lake a few hundred yards away where the plane could land. Took the two of us about five or six hours to complete the job.

From: Willieboat
16-Dec-14
City, when you thinking of doing this hunt ?

Maybe you need a partner? Hint Hint !

From: cityhunter
16-Dec-14
Steve i recall watching that video its stuck in my brain !!!

Willie im hunting Bou late Aug but while im up there i might as well try and add a moose hunt !

From: bsbowhunter
16-Dec-14
My buddy and I have shot two moose. The first one took 13 loads to get out, the second took 10. with a friend that's only 5-7 loads a piece, no problem! except.....when your buddy shoots his moose and it dies in the middle of a pond and it takes 7 hours to get him drug as close to shore as possible then stand in 2-3 feet of water while you cut him up. The second we cut up and had in bags in 2 hours, much easier! I would do either way again in a heart beat though! love Moose hunting!

From: mixed bag
16-Dec-14
mulepower,I have no worries.I was graced with a strong back and weak mind,lol.But we should try and kill one on dry land anyway

From: cityhunter
16-Dec-14
ok so do not shoot moose in water !any more helpful tidbits

From: Z Barebow
16-Dec-14
I seem to remember a bowhunting article from many years ago. I think it was Bill Krenz field dressing a moose in 2-3' of water, in a pond with skim ice.

Good luck Lou! Strong back, weak mind, will travel. Hint Hint!

From: NoWiser
16-Dec-14
I'm still waiting to kill an elk but I've been on two successful moose hunts in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in Minnesota. Both Bulls were shot about 24 miles from the wilderness boundary. About two of those miles were walking, the rest canoeing. Moose are big, really big. That said, I'd feel comfortable hunting them solo as long as I knew temps would be low enough for the meat and they weren't in a swamp or lake. Take it slow, work hard, and you'll be fine.

From: Mule Power
16-Dec-14
Mixed... 2 weak minds are better than 1. But a come-along is even better. Not so sure there is anything to anchor it to though. Willows and grass.

Given our surroundings I'd say there is better than a 50% chance of a moose dropping in the water. Gives me nightmares. Oh well... we only live once. I'm sure we'll live to tell about it. Beats getting dragged downstream underneath a loaded raft!

Note to self: Bring ibuprofen

From: t-roy
16-Dec-14

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
One more reminder city!

16-Dec-14
T-roy, you should have dropped him on the grassy strip behind him. Lol

DJ

17-Dec-14
Have done both but certainly not alone.. Well several elk but not an ak moose. We had two of us and the moose was at least three times the work and the fact that they like to fall in water.. Better find room for a come-along! Do u know who your hunting with yet (outfitter/ transporter?)

From: Herdbull
17-Dec-14
It sure sounds like a simple question, but there certainly are many answers. I have taken multiple elk in the Rockies and Alaskan moose solo. Others have talked about physical weight differences between the two. Elk are no picnic with the potential change in elevation to traverse with each load coming and going. Elk tend to range further and the solo hunter may find himself a great distance from camp "chasing them." But on the same same token the moose can scarce and the type of hunt may determine the amount of effort the hunter makes. A drop camp, may also dictate far travels to find a legal bull. For a non-resident bowhunter, the antler restrictions may force him to take a mature and large bodied bull.

For a bull elk it takes me five trips of boned out meat plus the antlers and cape. Loads were in the 80 pound range for meat. The AK moose take about 9 trips, but meat loads were heavier. Some GMU you can bone out the moose while others you must take out on quarters. When leaving the bone in the first mistake I made was to cut the lower legs off with my bone saw at the joint like I would do a whitetail deer. Well, this left me with no leverage to push up the hind legs for skinning and or rolling the moose over. So I suggest leaving legs intact until ready to bag. It takes me about 4 hours to cut up the meat and bagged for travel. Make sure you have enough battery life in case you are processing at night. I move the meat away from the kill site to a location I can observe safely as I approach multiple times. Yes I will admit that luck plays a big role in the answering this question. What if bears find your kill, will the animal fall in the water, or die at the bottom of the hill and your landing strip is at the top of a ridge, will you have a treacherous river crossing to deal with moving each load. Time and distance may not be on your side. Yes luck goes without saying. I once shot a bull 3 miles from a pick-up landing strip. It took 2 and a half days to pack out the 9 loads. Sounds like bad luck, but the good luck was I found an old trap line to help my travels through the high dwarf birch.... and my over all distance was down hill. I could walk back up to the meat pile in a little over an hour but it took over twice that to haul back. The point of most of our discussion falls on the topic of getting the meat, but far much more of your time could be spent on the solo hunting itself. Again, many answers to a simple question. Some folks go on a solo hunt for 3 or 4 days, or maybe a week. .... but the vastness of Alaska and its uncertainty may require the hunter to be in the field for a couple or several weeks. Being alone that long has its own challenges. For me, the solo hunt takes on an almost spiritual event sometime during the middle of the second week. Like many others, I tell myself I'm not doing this again. Ha! .. and then find myself going it alone year after year after year. But you have to at the least be in a good mindset and know that your solo hunt is not an escape from any troubles of life. It's quite the contrary. It can be a rejuvination where new life's resolutions can be contemplated. The solo hunt is not for everyone. Is it romantic to dream about? Yes! Will the solo hunt test your "metal?" YES! Even a lucky one will be a challenge. Only you can know if you are up for it. If you are successful in making a kill, you will find a way to get the meat out. Mike

From: Herdbull
17-Dec-14

Herdbull's embedded Photo
Herdbull's embedded Photo

From: Halibutman
17-Dec-14
Yes. That's a mystery ranch crew cab. That is the 10th moose I've carried out in that pack. I wouldn't take anything but a bulletproof pack on a moose hunt. Kifaru, MR, or Barney's are all excellent. A moose hunt is not a sheep hunt....weight shouldn't be your primary concern. Durability and reliability trump being ultralight in my opinion.

I agree with everything herdbull said with the exception of the trip count. I carry a quarter a trip (4), ribs (1), neck meat (1), straps and tenders (1), and rack (1), for a total of 8 trips maximum. I never get the cape, but would carry it on trip 8 with the rack if I did. I am also a big fan of building a fire at the kill and cooking and eating my fill with each return to the carcass. In the picture I shared earlier in this thread you can see the smoke around the carcass. That was for insect control during butchering. Works great.

From: cnelk
17-Dec-14

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
I have packed lots more elk than moose. Seems like elk are lighter but further to pack. My Colorado Shiras head, cape and horns were way over 100lbs

From: Mule Power
17-Dec-14
Halibutman... will my Badlands 2200 work?

lol Just kidding. I have a Barney's Freighter that I haven't had a chance to use yet. Pretty solid pack.

From: Herdbull
17-Dec-14

Herdbull's embedded Photo
Herdbull's embedded Photo

From: Herdbull
17-Dec-14

Herdbull's embedded Photo
Herdbull's embedded Photo
You can see the shelf webbing broke on this my final meat load. Ha! I've used this frame for over 25 years. Might be time to check out one suggested by Halibutman.

17-Dec-14
Halibutman- great tip about the fire. I wish we would have known about that, the bugs were relentless!! Once the moose is down and there is blood present, the bugs come out of nowhere.

DJ

From: Tatonka
17-Dec-14

Tatonka's embedded Photo
Tatonka's embedded Photo
Walking up to a big bull moose on the ground is like walking up to a Clydesdale.. When I was hunting this year the guides jokingly said there was a $5.00 per yard fine for every yard we had to pack a moose to the boat. After a few days of hunting and seeing where a moose might drop, their point was very well taken!

Saying or thinking that skinning, butchering, and packing a moose won't be all that bad and actually doing it are two very different ball games. It took two of us about 3 hours to skin, quarter, and pack my moose about 75 yards to the boat.. It was a cool day, but we were both soaked from the sweat by the time we had it loaded up.. Of course, neither of us are young!!! I'd do it all again in a heart beat!!!

From: Halibutman
17-Dec-14
A euro head of an Alaska bull (not boiled yet) fully skinned out weighed 86 pounds on the scales at the airport. That's without any sort of cape or anything.

An Alaska moose hunt is the big leagues in EVERY way. It's far and away my favorite hunt so far, and I've got 22 of the 29. I'd probably have them all if I could quit chasing moose!

For the money, a DIY moose hunt is an unreal value.

There is a rumor that the elk on etolin island are as big as moose. I know that to be false, since I killed both animals about two weeks apart and packed the elk out in 5 trips. The moose takes 8. Although the elk there are not "officially" Roosevelt's, they're Roosevelt's. Bigger in body than any of the bulls I've killed in New Mexico.

From: Halibutman
17-Dec-14
I might also add that body size varies greatly from species to species amongst moose. I actually had the opportunity to hunt and kill all three species in a single season. My Alaskan bull was almost twice as big as the bull I killed a Newfoundland. The Shiras cow I killed in Wyoming was no bigger than a cow elk.

From: NY Bowman
17-Dec-14

NY Bowman's embedded Photo
NY Bowman's embedded Photo
The rack of a moose I killed was 72#s and it was just the skull plate. The cape was over 100#s. They are not a lot of fun to disassemble in the water. You would think I would learn my lesson. Nope, two Alaska bulls and both died in the water. Moose only have bear and wolves as predators and their legs are nearly 7' to the shoulder. When injured or threatened they go to water knowing they can kick the wolve or bear to death as they are swimming up.

I've never killed an elk that died in the water. :)

From: sbschindler
18-Dec-14
Moose are lots harder, there are guys who do it solo but then they are tough bastards

From: Milo
19-Dec-14

Milo's embedded Photo
Milo's embedded Photo
I don't know why you guys are whining about butchering a moose in a little water. Like its a big deal or something.

From: petemc
19-Dec-14
Aside from the physical size of either elk or moose that has already been covered, the biggest tip I can give you is - learn how to butcher without gutting - The Gutless Method. I've been a part of butchering maybe 10 elk and 2 moose. Two of us have quartered and hung an elk in 45 minutes, two of us butchered a cow moose in 2013 and a bull this year and had meat ready for transport (boned and bagged) in an hour and a half both times. Have good game bags, plenty of rope, a bone saw for the rack, and several very sharp knives.

From: Rick M
19-Dec-14

Rick M's embedded Photo
Rick M's embedded Photo
Not sure why you guys keep killing em in the water, I prefer dry land:)

Fortunately I made a bad enough shot that mine got out of the river before it died and DJ made a great shot which kept his from getting to the river. In my case it is better to be lucky than good.

From: cityhunter
19-Dec-14
the insides look like they went thru a blender

From: sbschindler
19-Dec-14
 photo 2013ontariomoose123_zps8ba3304c.jpg

 photo 2013ontariomoose124_zpsa70f3cc1.jpg

 photo 2013ontariomoosehunt184_zpsbe747eab.jpg

It is always good to have help with a Moose, I've done a few elk on my own and there is really no comparison.

From: Mule Power
19-Dec-14
Howler which one of those guys is you?

I wish I could take a pic like that Rick... all meat comes out on the bone where we are hunting. Ugh!

NY Bowman... those trees aren't that far away to anchor to. No come-along?

You guys are giving me nightmares. lol

From: sbschindler
19-Dec-14
Mule Power,, top pic I'm the guy bent over in the black shirt and in the bottom pic I'm the guy hauling the horns. the other 2 guys are my hunting partners and I couldn't pick 2 better guys, I know you abd I have been conversing for a few years now but would probably walk right past each other if we were to meet on the street,lol here is a better pic.  photo 2013ontariomoose121_zps33510924.jpg

From: Mule Power
19-Dec-14
Great to put a face with a name after so many years.

Bowsite... a place full of friends who don't even know each other. I'm looking forward to meeting my moose hunting partner one of these days. haha

From: Rick M
20-Dec-14
Mule,

Everything but the rib meat and scraps came out on the bone anyway. When a quarter weighs 130lbs an extra 10lbs of bone won't make much of a difference to your back:) With digital camera evidence these days I would think ak. would bea able to change the rules in the "bone in" units.

You will get it done!! Louis will as well.

From: DonVathome
26-Dec-14
Distance + terrain + elevation are the only issues.

I know it sounds sarcastic but 100 pounds of moose weighs as much ans 100 pounds of elk and as much as 100# of feathers.

Many Alaskans talk up a dead moose, and yes they are twice as big (mature bulls). But assuming no muskeg, an elk shot twice away is usually a little tougher (because of elevation - lower oxygen and elevation gain/loss).

A 1600# moose shot on flat terrain (no marsh etc.) at 1 mile is the same amount of work as an 800# elk shot at 1/2 mile (after butchering).

For moose rig a simple lever system and take out small chunks.

Just like cnelk said elk are lighter but further.

You will be fine, be in shape, common sense and do not rush.

From: willliamtell
26-Dec-14
Stakewood, that first pic of yours reminded me of steak tartar sushi, and I'm not even a bear!

City, you responded to how do you get up with a 150 lbs load, simple just stand up. Try it. As any experienced backpacker will tell you, getting the load first couple feet up with a 75 lbs plus pack can be a bitch. I always try to load and lift with my pack on a rock or stump, anything to get me in a decent hacksquat position. A partner pulling helps a lot. Solo on the tundra - I don't know, knee pads?

From: cityhunter
26-Dec-14
yikes by the end of this tread them moose quarters will be close to 250lb they keep getting bigger!

From: Halibutman
26-Dec-14
One of the bulls I killed was 980 pounds on the scale for backhaul at the airport. That was without the Cape. Also, we ate both tenderloins and an entire backstrap in the field. You do the math.

A 150 pound hindquarter is not unrealistic at all.

To get up under the heavy load I usually rollover on my belly and get up on my hands and knees like a turtle with a really heavy shell. Lean forward placing the weight on your hands and extend your legs fully… You should be able to stand up. As mentioned above… The 1st foot from the ground is definitely the most difficult.

03-Sep-15
Holy crap, I hadn't seen this thread and maybe wish now I hadn't....Whoa!

From: Mule Power
04-Sep-15
No $h1t Ike. You had to resurrect it didn't you! Now I have that weak in the knees and butterflies in the stomach feeling. Leaving in exactly one week.

I'm just a little guy so I plan on loading down Mixedbag. By the way Mixed... what's your height and weight? Run any marathons lately?

From: ki-ke
04-Sep-15
This may not answer your question, Lou, but is something to consider with a partner.....

On my last Alaska drop hunt, I met a guy that used a method I would never have imaginedI

the guy was a native Alaskan and killed a moose every year, for like, 30 years. He packs in a Dewalt cordless sawzall and a couple charged batteries. When the moose is down, he guts the bull, then slices the skin at the marks where you would as if quartering a steer. He then uses the sawzall to quarter the moose, cutting the spine in half lengthwise through each quarter and leaving the skin on. He then cut slots through skin and meat for "handles" and depending on distance, him and his partner would each grab a handle or rig straps like sled dogs and start hauling to the boat or pick up spot. The meat stayed clean as could be and all was out in 5 loads, the last being the head. I helped him drag one and was amazed how easily we dragged a 300 lb. quarter with the hair on. I have done it both ways, and can say that it is far easier to drag 300 lbs. with a partner than to carry 120+ solo. One of those plastic sleds would make it even easier.

The hide on quarters just fit through the door of a Maule or 180. No way in a cub.....

Things change a bit if you're mounting the bull and saving the cape, but you could still drag the hinds...

From: Mad_Angler
04-Sep-15

Mad_Angler's Link
Anything can be done.

Breaking down a moose alone is quite a job. If you've done gutless on a few elk, you could do a moose too. I would guess that it would take me 4-6 hours to completely break down a moose.

When we hunted, we left ALL the meat on the bone. Our area required most of the meat to be left on the bone. But we left it all on to minimize the number of cuts and to minimize the number of surfaces that would dry out.

We had the following 11 pieces: antlers, neck, mid spine, back spine, left ribs, right ribs, brisket, front leg, front leg, back leg, back leg. It took 9 loads to get him to the river. The hike was about 1 1/2 miles. It took 3 of us one long day to get it back to camp. One guy was a beast. He took 4 very heavy loads.

This little saw will break down a moose.

Also remember that in Alaska, the antlers must come out LAST. All meat must come first.

From: Beendare
04-Sep-15
I've only packed 2 moose...one of them the hind quarter was 150# easy...and we couldn't bone it out...had to pack quarters. The longest run was 200yds to a boat on the river. If I would have had to pack it a mile through muskeg it would have been a whole different ballgame.

I shot one that ended up in the water and would not have been able to get it out solo.

From: dlpassthru
04-Sep-15
I think I'll stick to deer.

From: mixed bag
04-Sep-15
Don't run any marathons,but can haul some weight.I didn't workout for this trip like I would for elk.I wanted to keep my weight on and most of my strength.When I drop down to 175-180 for elk,I notice a big difference in my strength.We have a raft for loading the quarters into and then back to shore.Since its inevitable that the moose will die in the water.I'm not concerned at all.It will be a bitch but I knew that when I signed up.I'll have my sawzall to cut off un-needed bone and lighten the load.Plus, it'll be great for cutting the ribs out. I'm sure we'll both have that "oh shi77" lookon our face when we walk upon the 1st one,but we'll get er done.No worries See you in a week mulepower

From: deerman406
04-Sep-15
Did not take any moose myself but had a close friend and his hunting partner make a huge mistake. My buddy shot a giant moose, gave it some time and began to track it. At one point while on the blood trail a moose stood up in front of him and his hunting partner at 45 yards, His buddy said he had a good angle and could get another arrow into him. He shot, the bull ran off and tumbled about 80 yards away. They were both elated but as they were walking up to the moose they saw antlers in the tall grass, there laid dead another moose. This was the one my buddy had shot first. They had no way of knowing as they both were over 60"s and on the same blood trail. These guys were both in their early 60's at the time. They immediately started hustling to cape, and take care of the meat. Started at 4 in the afternoon and finished by 8 the next morning, exhausted!! Luckily they took photos and documented everything with video as well. Long story short, the judge they appeared before believed their story but even with a float plane to fly in and take out the moose meat it was a 2 day ordeal and they lost over 500#s of meat, which I am told is against the law to let game meat go to waste. They were fined $25 a pound for the wasted meat but were lucky as I was told there was also a law on the books saying that a hunting party was not to shoot more than one moose in a 24 hr. period. It also kind of stunk because in order to try and get the cape and antlers plus the meat out as quickly as possible they split the skull plates in two, which disquailified them for P&Y. This was a float trip by the way. This just shows that when dealing with an animal that big, you better be sure you have a plan to get it out without any waste. By the way, the game wardens estimated the one bull weighed 1550#s and the other near 1700#s. The reason they lost so much meat is they stacked it and the outside meat cooled but the meat inside never got a chance to cool and spoiled as the temps climbed very high for a few days. Shawn

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