Carbon Express Arrows
Wild Boar Hunters /Experienced
Hogs
Contributors to this thread:
razorhead 01-Jan-15
Ishy Isomer 01-Jan-15
razorhead 01-Jan-15
boothill 01-Jan-15
ahunter55 01-Jan-15
Firehuntfish 01-Jan-15
pdk25 01-Jan-15
razorhead 01-Jan-15
weekender21 01-Jan-15
drycreek 01-Jan-15
Buffalo1 01-Jan-15
Zebrakiller 01-Jan-15
Zebrakiller 01-Jan-15
SDHNTR(home) 01-Jan-15
Buffalo1 01-Jan-15
Tracker 01-Jan-15
WV Mountaineer 01-Jan-15
Buffalo1 01-Jan-15
elkmtngear 01-Jan-15
razorhead 01-Jan-15
dm/wolfskin 01-Jan-15
weekender21 01-Jan-15
weekender21 02-Jan-15
Sapcut 02-Jan-15
weekender21 02-Jan-15
Sapcut 02-Jan-15
weekender21 02-Jan-15
Sapcut 02-Jan-15
ollie 02-Jan-15
TD 02-Jan-15
joehunter8301 03-Jan-15
Lee 03-Jan-15
tobinsghost 03-Jan-15
Fuzzy 05-Jan-15
bowhunt1 05-Jan-15
Fuzzy 05-Jan-15
Kdog 12-Jan-15
Seminole 12-Jan-15
Kawabunga 12-Jan-15
Kawabunga 12-Jan-15
Swampbuck 12-Jan-15
razorsharp 14-Jan-15
pdk25 14-Jan-15
razorsharp 15-Jan-15
weekender21 16-Jan-15
weekender21 18-Jan-15
weekender21 18-Jan-15
weekender21 18-Jan-15
Dino 25-Jan-15
wild1 25-Jan-15
Bigpizzaman 25-Jan-15
Rocky D 26-Jan-15
BuzAL 26-Jan-15
From: razorhead
01-Jan-15
I want to know, where is the perfect spot to hit a boar, when it is broadside.......

I was told that it should be 2 inches above the shoulder, since the shoulder blade goes forward, and by hitting this spot, I would go thru heart and lungs......

Also for a quartering away shot, should the shot, be behind the shoulder, and angled forward.....

I was told not to hit it thru the center or behind the shoulder, if its broadside, if I can help it.....

So to all of you, who have shot a few, what do you say...

01-Jan-15
Shoot the heart.

01-Jan-15

Kevin from Wisconsin's MOBILE embedded Photo
Kevin from Wisconsin's MOBILE embedded Photo

Shoot the heart.

From: Ishy Isomer
01-Jan-15
What kind of broadhead and set up are you using? You are smart to plan this out... very tough critters - they have a "shield" of fascia that acts like armor behind the shoulder... if you can get close you can get through it with whitetail stuff - I use a 180g silver flame and get them quartering away behind the shoulder - works for me

From: razorhead
01-Jan-15
I would use a 145 grain Razor Cap........ I talked to a guy who has shot 5 pigs and swears by the Ram Cat 125

Kevin I will print that out, thanks so much

From: boothill
01-Jan-15
That picture is totally accurate. Do not be afraid to shoot straight up the leg and not behind like on a deer. I've killed a bunch of hogs with whitetail gear. My setup is 60#, 380 grain arrow and 100gr Magnus Buzzcut and it puts them down quick. Just dont shoot high and back.

01-Jan-15
Yeah, what Boothill said. If you shoot them like a whitetail behind the shoulder you'll hit guts.

From: ahunter55
01-Jan-15

ahunter55's embedded Photo
ahunter55's embedded Photo
I've shot 16 of various sizes with 3 blade fixed Rocky Mountains, 125 grns, 60#s. My G-Son & son in law have used 3 blade fixed also. Heading to S. Tx in March & we are all using 3 blade fixed. I prefer broadside or just a slight quartering away.

From: Firehuntfish
01-Jan-15

Firehuntfish's embedded Photo
Firehuntfish's embedded Photo
Razorhead,

Good question...If you are talking about the preferred shot placement on a mature boar(150-plus lbs.), your best shot is a hard quartering away shot several inches behind the crease of the shoulder. Mature boars develop a thick gristle plate that gets thicker and heavier as they age. I doubt you would even penetrate it with a broadside shoulder shot on a really mature boar. For this very reason, I would also recommend a short, compact, heavy duty fixed-blade broadhead that provides maximum opportunity for penetration.

For smaller boars and sows, an arrow straight up the front leg mid-line to the lower 1/3rd will do the trick. A hog's vitals are a little father forward than other North American game, very similar to that of African game. The lungs don't come as far back as they do on a whitetail for example...A broadside shot more than 4-5" behind the crease is a gut shot on a hog.

Good luck! shoot a bunch!

From: pdk25
01-Jan-15
Low and back is worse that high and back, for what it is worth. I have killed them with both 3 blade and 2 blade. Most hogs you run into don't have enough of a shield to worry about with the average compound bow set up. Large shielded boar are a different ballgame. So many variables. You haven't mentioned your setup as far as bow goes, as far as I can tell.

From: razorhead
01-Jan-15
My set up will be a Matthews S2 set at 58 pounds, with a 30 inch Easton 340 FMJ and a 145 grain 3 blade Razor Cap broad head

I know pigs are tough, so we will see... This set up shoots well and hard..... Puts an elk down, I can tell you that......

From: weekender21
01-Jan-15

weekender21's embedded Photo
weekender21's embedded Photo
Low and tight behind the shoulder and they won't go far. Your set-up is fine. I shot this boar with a 447 grain ACC Pro Hunter, /slick trick grizz trick 2 launched from a 60LB Mathews CHILL.

Your average hog isn't any harder to kill than a deer. The really big boars can have extremely thick "shields" and that puts them in a completely different category of tough. The shield and thick mud caked hair can make it really tough to get good penetration.

Have fun, hogs were designed for the bow hunter!

From: drycreek
01-Jan-15
What weekender said about the mud. It can dull your blades on impact if he's really caked with mud, something that is pretty usual in the summer time when ticks and lice infest the hogs .

As an aside, a 75 grain boat tail hollow point in the ear does an excellent job also :)

From: Buffalo1
01-Jan-15
I ditto what others have said about avoiding the shoulder. When a pig gets to 150#+ they develop a shield. If is almost impossible to penetrate that shield with a BH and with some bullets.

The heart is low and slightly forward. Best shot scenario is quartering away aiming a low at the crease. This should put you in the heart.

Bottomline: Stay away from the shoulder on larger hogs.

Best eating size hog is 75-125# range. Piglets are super delicious. When they get up in size the meat gets gritty.

From: Zebrakiller
01-Jan-15
razorhead you are getting great advise on this one I jave killed a ton of hogs with an arrow everyone is spot on!

From: Zebrakiller
01-Jan-15
razorhead you are getting great advise on this one I jave killed a ton of hogs with an arrow everyone is spot on!

01-Jan-15
Michael, it's not that hogs are tough, but rather most folks simply hit them either too high, too far back, or quartering. Our guests shoot between 500 to 600 hogs each year so we get to see a pretty good sampling of what can go wrong. For about eleven of the past 14 years we employed the use of a bloodtracking dog that not only located dead hogs but bayed up wounded hogs so we could finish them off with a rifle. This gave us the luxury of doing a necropsy on each wounded hog to find out why it wasn't dead.

The vitals lie incredibly low and far forward on a hog when compared to other North American game species, so a majority of folks shoot them like they would a deer- behind the shoulder. I can't tell you how many times we've heard "I hit him perfect", while tracking a wounded hog. What would be perfect on a deer or elk may be a gut shot on a hog. Their stomach comes as far forward as an inch behind the elbow.

Also, if you look at their neck and visualize their spinal column in the middle of their neck, you can see just how low their spine is. Anything above the spine is simply muscle and even a high lung shot is not ideal as they can run a long way before expiring, and by the time the first drop of blood hits the ground from that high hole there's a very high chance you won't find it. There's a lot of fear about hitting the shield on a hog also. First of all, only an old, mature boar hog develops the shield. It is simply cartilage the builds up over years of rubbing to encourage the build-up of this cartilage. While we have seen shields of 2" or more thick on mature boar hogs, a sharp cut-to-tip broadhead penetrates that shield like a hot knife through butter. Bullets can be hampered, but broadheads not as much. Look at it like a bulletproof vest on a hog. If you hit them in the right spot, they're going to die.

Lastly, on the subject of quartering shots...we strongly suggest our guests wait for a perfectly broadside shots to increase the likelihood of recovering their animal. Unless you hit the aorta, heart or other major blood vessel, it's not likely you will kill a hog with a single-lung hit. Just like a human being with a collapsed lung, the other lung will continue to function, and we've field dressed many hogs with only one good lung. More often than not, if only one lung is hit, the hog will survive. I'll post some pics to show better what I'm trying to say.

01-Jan-15

Tradman and Huntress's embedded Photo
Tradman and Huntress's embedded Photo
Here's a hog that was shot by one of our guests that was slightly quartering away. The arrow entered just a little bit behind the entrance side lung and exited through the offside lung. We shot this pig with a rifle the next day. Most folks would call that a perfect shot...until you see the hog running across a field a day after it was shot.

From: SDHNTR(home)
01-Jan-15
Straight up center of front leg and one third up. Shoot 425 gr + arrow and a SHARP COC broadhead and you won't have to worry too much about the shield. Gear up for the biggest boar you might find because you never know what you might encounter. Increase arrow weight if you are light on poundage. Big boars are harder to kill than anything in the lower 48, IMO. Not much room for error.

Don't push em, but if possible gain high ground immediately after shooting a big boar so you can keep eyes on them, if possible. They don't bleed much and you can't always count on a good blood trail.

01-Jan-15

Tradman and Huntress's embedded Photo
Tradman and Huntress's embedded Photo
And here's another one that was shot a day or two after it was hit. This pig was perfectly broadside but was hit just a tad bit back. The liver was lacerated but isn't immediately fatal in most hogs. Both of these hogs would have died several days or even weeks later from the resulting infection, but not during the time the hunters were still here.

So to answer your original question, try to hit them directly above the elbow in the bottom one third of the chest, perfectly broadside. That will bring home the bacon!

Hope this information helps you and others as well!

From: Buffalo1
01-Jan-15

Buffalo1's MOBILE embedded Photo
Buffalo1's MOBILE embedded Photo

Here is a photo of the shield on a 200# Russian boar. You will note that the shield is approximately 3/4" thick.

When you skin a hog you will also find out how sharp your knife is and how good of steel your blade is made of and a hog's hide tells the truth about sharpness of an edge.

From: Tracker
01-Jan-15
Low and tight like weekender mentioned.

01-Jan-15
I'm not sure of the broadhead firehuntfish uses but, I'm certain his hunting partner is better looking than any of you. :^)

From: Buffalo1
01-Jan-15
Tradman and Huntress,

That is some great info you shared. I know you have seen your share and heard your share. Hard to beat top notch advice. Thanks

From: elkmtngear
01-Jan-15

elkmtngear's Link
 photo hiresboar_zps2f1b055b.jpg

I hit this large boar (est. 225-250#) quartering away. The arrow entered about 3 to 4 inches behind the near shoulder, and buried in the hide just ahead of the offside shoulder.

It took him about 200 yards to go down "hit perfectly". I was simply amazed at the thickness and weight of the hide. The head and hide alone was probably nearly 100 pounds.

I gave him an hour, since he was a big boar. Years ago, one of the local Bow Shop Owners hit a boar a little too far back, and he was blind-sided by the hog while bloodtrailing it. The result was 4 hours of surgery on one of his calves.

They are indeed tough critters... and dangerous!

Best of Luck, Jeff (Bowsite Sponsor)

From: razorhead
01-Jan-15
So far thanks everyone. lots of great info and knowledge here, that is why I love this site. A guy from Texas sent me a message, and said my set up, will drive a hole, you could put a canoe thru, if I hit em right......

I have a 3D target and will practice like you said, at the right spots....

I know bears are not as tough, but my previous set up which was 65 pounds and a 160 grain snuffer, well lets just say, there was not much tracking on those bears that I hit.....One outfitter told me, "now thats how you kill something"....

I had to scale down, but my partner will be shooting 75 lbs Hoyt with a 180 grain head, something he got from a guy in Africa, not sure of the name...

From: dm/wolfskin
01-Jan-15

dm/wolfskin's embedded Photo
dm/wolfskin's embedded Photo
Right there.

From: weekender21
01-Jan-15

weekender21's embedded Photo
weekender21's embedded Photo
This sow was shot from about 12' up and stood 8 or 10 yards from the tree. The picture shows the entrance. Arrow went through the center of the heart and exited a little lower. I'm not sure where most people shoot deer but this is where I aim.

The vitals on a hog are slightly forward but not much. I always try to shoot hogs and deer tight to the shoulder. Every deer I've heart shot from the ground has a hole through it's leg at the elbow. Any lower and the heart would be outside the hide!

Nice shot dm/wolfskin, I'd call that the X ring! Impressive shot with the stick bow!

From: weekender21
02-Jan-15

weekender21's embedded Photo
weekender21's embedded Photo
My wife shot this little boar last February, this was about the shortest blood trail I've ever witnessed on a non spine shot hog. He was slightly quartering forward at the shot. The entrance side is shown and the arrow exited slightly forward of the off shoulder. Barely caught the front of the lungs and was over the heart (basically disconnected the heart from the lungs).

From: Sapcut
02-Jan-15

Sapcut's Link
This is a big boar I killed with my recurve and TuffHead broadhead. It had 2 inches thick of armour on each side. The shield also ran all the way down to his flanks.

The arrow went thru bow shields, part of scapula and everything in between.

From: weekender21
02-Jan-15
That's no exaggeration about the shield running all the way down the flanks. I've killed a few old boars you'd have to kill with a Texas heart shot if you wanted to completely avoid the shield.

Sapcut, did I read that right? 830 grain arrow!

From: Sapcut
02-Jan-15
Yes. 830 grains with 32% FOC shot with a 71# recurve.

The shot was actually a front quartering shot. That arrow went thru a lot of thick bad news swine armour before exiting. And like I mentioned, he was on the ground dead in 8 seconds.

BTW...if you build your arrows accordingly, there is no need to avoid the shield.

From: weekender21
02-Jan-15
That's a serious trad set-up Sapcut!

From: Sapcut
02-Jan-15
Serious pigs takes a serious weapon.

From: ollie
02-Jan-15
A well hit pig will go down fast. Marginally hit pigs keep going and going. They do not have a tendency to bed down like an injured whitetail.

From: TD
02-Jan-15
What Tradman and Huntress said above.

Killed a few pigs. Their vitals are more forward than deer/elk. I shoot em straight up the leg, but then I shoot pretty much everything straight up the leg.

Big boars have a "shield" but I have never been stopped by it. Any decent weight arrow with a good head (COC is better yet) will get through it no problem. Normally through the other side too but have had a few the far side shield has stopped. In all honesty I trust my gear and pay it no attention.

Shooting 460 grain right now and a good 2 blade has blown right through every time with every pig, but have killed fair number with the old 4 blade muzzy. I shoot 70 lbs but I knew several folks that shoot 60 and have no issues with penetration. Tuned is going to be very important as well, an arrow with all it's energy behind it. I would shy away from wide cut mechs and/or steep blade angles.

Smaller pigs will not be any issue period. Just hit em where you should.

03-Jan-15

joehunter8301's embedded Photo
joehunter8301's embedded Photo
Pretty much agree with weekender. I try to get close cuz a poor marginal shot makes for a no fun track job. Hitm good an usually they will die close. Hogs at times don't bleed very well either so tracking can be tricky. For me straight up the leg infront of crease a tad is ideal on broadside average hogs. Big boars the shield can Be tough so ideally quartering away has worked best or even head on. This pig made it 50 yards. Exit almost exact same spot on other side.

From: Lee
03-Jan-15
I have shot quite a few and never worried about the shield - I shot 125 grain Rothaar Snuffers that Magnus was producing - the arrow MIGHT stop on the fletch but usually blew through them - a hell of a head!! I shoot them low and tight when broadside or put the arrow in from of the shoulder on the opposite side on a quartering away shot - deadly.

Good luck,

Lee

From: tobinsghost
03-Jan-15

tobinsghost's embedded Photo
tobinsghost's embedded Photo
Of course the 3D is off.

From: Fuzzy
05-Jan-15
low and tight to the leg

From: bowhunt1
05-Jan-15
A third of the way up the body and tight against the leg/shoulder.

From: Fuzzy
05-Jan-15
about 7 PM of the "line" of the ten-ring on that 3D target, is your 12-ring on a broadside hog

From: Kdog
12-Jan-15
Right above the front leg (the first pic is good), man I need to go shoot a pig! Haven't killed one in a long time.....

From: Seminole
12-Jan-15
boothill nailed it.

From: Kawabunga
12-Jan-15

Kawabunga's embedded Photo
Kawabunga's embedded Photo
I Would say straight up the leg also, shot this fat sow this weekend actually quartering too but hit straight above the leg, straight through the heart. Like was mentioned above, hit good they dont go far but hit bad and they dont stop.

From: Kawabunga
12-Jan-15

Kawabunga's embedded Photo
Kawabunga's embedded Photo
You can just see the entrance in the above pic and i still was behind the joint below the shoulder, crazy bloodtrail too, she must have done a 360.

From: Swampbuck
12-Jan-15

Swampbuck's embedded Photo
Swampbuck's embedded Photo
Heart shot!!

From: razorsharp
14-Jan-15

razorsharp's embedded Photo
razorsharp's embedded Photo
Slightly quartering away, low and tight to the leg. Lodged in the far shoulder.

From: pdk25
14-Jan-15
Dude, give that thing a bath.

From: razorsharp
15-Jan-15
That mud was like additional armor! 1" thick in spots AND on top of the shield to boot!

From: weekender21
16-Jan-15

weekender21's embedded Photo
weekender21's embedded Photo
Beautiful shot razor! I double lunged this little hog last week. The whole thing will be on the smoker this weekend!

From: weekender21
18-Jan-15

weekender21's embedded Photo
weekender21's embedded Photo
Here are a few educational pictures. I arrowed this boar tonight at ten yards. This is the entrance.

From: weekender21
18-Jan-15

weekender21's embedded Photo
weekender21's embedded Photo
And the exit. Slick Trick "X" through the heart.

From: weekender21
18-Jan-15

weekender21's embedded Photo
weekender21's embedded Photo
All smiles!

24-Jan-15

BlanchardRiverHunter's embedded Photo
BlanchardRiverHunter's embedded Photo
This hog didn't like my 2 blade rage hypodermic. I will take that shot placement but should have been a couple more inches closer to the front leg

From: Dino
25-Jan-15

Dino's embedded Photo
Dino's embedded Photo
Nice shot! How's the entrance hole with those heads? Here's a hog that shows the entrance hole with a 100gr Wasp Jak Hammer 1 3/4" cut. She went less than 50 yards.

From: wild1
25-Jan-15

wild1's Link
Have a look:

From: Bigpizzaman
25-Jan-15

Bigpizzaman's embedded Photo
Bigpizzaman's embedded Photo
300#'s +/-

Shot in South Texas. Shot him broadside behind the shoulder thru the "plate". No pass-thru but he only made about 40 yards.

From: Rocky D
26-Jan-15
I have A Sh#tload of hogs and it took me awhile to figure they were not deer and you could not shoot them like deer if you expected a high percentage of recovery.

I cannot use dogs to track where I hunt and I hunt a lot in the summer since for me they are the only game in town.

Obviously, I am not going to contest what Tradman said because he has more experience in one year than most will in a lifetime as far as pigs go. What I will say is when you have trained yourself for years to shoot deer you have to make a conscious decision to aim different for pigs.

This may may not be as difficult for guys that have traveled and hunted different species may not be as challenged.

As for me, I have not had animal that will make you pay more for what is considered an ideal shot on deer like animals than Mr. Pig.

Be it big, little, or small hit him wrong and you may end up with more story than bacon.

From: BuzAL
26-Jan-15
Don't shoot at a spot ON the hog. Look and shoot INTO the pig to that spot low and directly between their legs, whether broadside or angled away.

Actually, shoot deer this way, too.

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