Mathews Inc.
What can I Bring Across??
Moose
Contributors to this thread:
Elkguide27 08-Jun-15
Wildsau 08-Jun-15
Fuzzy 09-Jun-15
Db1 09-Jun-15
Kurt 09-Jun-15
Ziek 09-Jun-15
Elkguide27 09-Jun-15
Ziek 09-Jun-15
Rob in VT 09-Jun-15
Bou'bound 09-Jun-15
Elkguide27 10-Jun-15
camodave 10-Jun-15
Ambush 10-Jun-15
Elkguide27 11-Jun-15
eddie c 11-Jun-15
bigguy 11-Jun-15
Ambush 11-Jun-15
Elkguide27 12-Jun-15
Ambush 12-Jun-15
From: Elkguide27
08-Jun-15
Its been a few years since I crossed over into Canada and I was wondering if there is a site or list somewhere that tells you what you can all bring across and how much of it you can have before you have to pay a duty fee on it.

I know most products are more in Canada so I would like to take as much across as allowed Thanks

From: Wildsau
08-Jun-15
I go to Newfoundland every couple years, and the only thing that they seem to ask us when crossing into New Brunswick is how much beer or alcohol we have.

From: Fuzzy
09-Jun-15
Wildsau, how much DO you have? lol

From: Db1
09-Jun-15
Regulations are easily found if you search online for Canada vistit duty regulations. What ever they are, I always feel it's cheaper to bring whatever it is up, declare it and pay the duty tax. For some reason some of my friends like American coors better than Canadian. I also bring tobacco for them which is $20 cheaper in states. Whatever you do, always declare it. Trying to sneak it in is not worth the risk.

From: Kurt
09-Jun-15
Google your question and you will come up with Canadian regs on the importation of goods to remain behind in Canada. Rules change routinely on food stuffs like poultry products and beef so look at the latest information, or call the customs and immigration people at the Canada side of your border crossing for the information.

From: Ziek
09-Jun-15
Yeah, well, we're planning a road trip through Canada to Alaska and back. We've checked the web sites and called. The information provided is contradictory and confusing. We get different answers with no definitive clarity depending on the source. Even something as benign as kibble dog food has ridiculous regulations. We're going to try using common sense and just hope for the best.

From: Elkguide27
09-Jun-15
Yeah I found the same thing while Google searching, Just seeing if there where real specific items they frown upon we are planning on camping through Canada the whole 10 days before our hunt, so just trying to plan out meals and see what we can or can't bring across, Thanks

From: Ziek
09-Jun-15
"Just seeing if there where real specific items they frown upon..."

For sure, anything that even resembles a weapon, or might be used in one. From handguns, to bullets, to stun guns, pepper sprays, and some knives.

From: Rob in VT
09-Jun-15
When ever I have crossed, they seem to ask about vegetables and fruit.

From: Bou'bound
09-Jun-15
don't bring across you own butt if you have a felony or DUI in your background.

From: Elkguide27
10-Jun-15
Yeah the last time I was across they lumped in potatoes when they asked if I had any weapons Lol. I know they really frown upon the DUI Glad I don't have to worry about those

From: camodave
10-Jun-15
I know a gentleman with a DUI in his background who spent 10 grand to get a letter saying he is allowed into Canada "at the discretion of the border officials"

DDave

From: Ambush
10-Jun-15
Where specifically are you crossing into and camping? Larger Rv or tenting? Moving every day?

From: Elkguide27
11-Jun-15
Tent camping the whole way. we are crossing at Port Huron and then going to drop down to Niagra Falls Ontario and then try and get to New Brunswick and Nova Scotia fairly quick so we can spend a few day there.

From: eddie c
11-Jun-15
just curious, do they let you bring in Thermocells?

From: bigguy
11-Jun-15
Thermacells are no problem. Don't bring a hand gun or bear spray!(But you can buy the bear spray once your here)

From: Ambush
11-Jun-15
If you are in a tourist area, then you will be gouged accordingly. Even tent sites can be expensive until after September long weekend. If you shop the main Grocieries stores and chains for the rest with your 20% buying advantage you won't notice much of a difference. Customs want allow any fresh fruit and about forty pounds of meat. But with tents and coolers you will be buying fresh every few days anyway. The Niagra region will be wall to wall fruit and veggie stands. For hardware, auto, camping etc, check Canadian Tire and Walmart. All major malls in any mediem size town will have several large stores that cover nearly everything. Some places in Quebec can be deliberately "French". It's not you, it's them. But most places will be friendly and accommodating. Once you hit the Maritines the pace will slow and the people are friendly.

I have found it usefull to have a list of all the major items I'm bringing when I go back and forth. Cameras, optics, sporting goods, etc.

No handguns and if you are bringing guns make sure you have proper paper work for BOTH coming and going. Never say you have a gun "just for protection".

Have a great trip.

From: Elkguide27
12-Jun-15
Ambush Thanks for the info, We are taking out bows on the hunt so should be a little less headache going across hopefully. Im sure we will spend at least 1 or 2 nights in a hotel just to get a good shower in and get cleaned up and maybe get some laundry done. Any good places or certain towns you recommend to visit we want to get to Alma, New Brunswick and to Fundy National park for at least a couple days. and We are planning on Ferrying to Newfoundland about 2 days a head of our hunt to try and see some of the island. Thanks again

From: Ambush
12-Jun-15
Depends on where you're from and the scenery you're used. If you are from inland I would recommend the Cabot Trail around the Cape Breton coast. Lots of camping and tons of Bed'n Breakfast. Unique little seaside villages spread all along. My sister, who lives there, says that cape Breton is about thirty years behind every one else. And they dearly wish they were Fifty years behind everyone else.

When you enter each province you will find numerous info centres. You can get maps and "things to see and do" pamphlets. They're free. They are usefull and make fair campfire starter to

Many of the camp grounds will have full services including showers and laundry.

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