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Age these sheep horns
Wild Sheep
Contributors to this thread:
Carnivore 10-Jun-15
Carnivore 10-Jun-15
Carnivore 10-Jun-15
R. Hale 10-Jun-15
sticksender 10-Jun-15
camodave 10-Jun-15
Southern draw 10-Jun-15
Chief 10-Jun-15
Ambush 10-Jun-15
Carnivore 11-Jun-15
Ambush 11-Jun-15
Bigdan 11-Jun-15
Carnivore 11-Jun-15
NvaGvUp 12-Jun-15
Ambush 12-Jun-15
TD 13-Jun-15
Ambush 13-Jun-15
Carnivore 14-Jun-15
From: Carnivore
10-Jun-15

Carnivore's embedded Photo
Carnivore's embedded Photo
First, these are bighorn, right? And how old? Thanks for helping out an ignorant elk hunter.

From: Carnivore
10-Jun-15

Carnivore's embedded Photo
Carnivore's embedded Photo

From: Carnivore
10-Jun-15

Carnivore's embedded Photo
Carnivore's embedded Photo

From: R. Hale
10-Jun-15
Appear to be 8 or 9. Hard to tell for certain due to the angles and blurring.

Also appear to be from thinhorn. Most likely a Dall sheep. Triangler ridge on outer edge is the key. Most bighorns are more oval. Not all. And all thinhorns do not have the ridge. I have seen them both ways. Some of the black Stone's rams near Williston lake look exactly like bighorns in all but color. Huge bodies and oval horns. I called them black bighorns. They were the southern most Stone's.

Nice set of horns.

From: sticksender
10-Jun-15
Did you find them...if so what state/province?

From: camodave
10-Jun-15
The only thing I know is that, no matter the species or the age, I would shoot that ram without question

DDave

10-Jun-15
Thinhorns 9 like R. Hale said hard to tell from angles of the basees.

From: Chief
10-Jun-15
I'd say 8-9 also. And I'd say either Stone's or Dall since their not broomed at all, triangular, and lighter in color.

From: Ambush
10-Jun-15
I'd say nine year old Stone. Possibly ten. Hard to say with the bases obscured Very tight curl and likely not as long as the pic appears. What is the length and base measurement Carries his mass well.

From: Carnivore
11-Jun-15
Thanks all for your answers. I did not find them, I could not find out the provenance, and I was not allowed to measure them. I was just shocked to find them hanging in a tavern in Florida and had to take some pictures.

From: Ambush
11-Jun-15
Did they have a metal plug?

From: Bigdan
11-Jun-15

Bigdan's embedded Photo
Bigdan's embedded Photo
I don't think there from a wild sheep. Maybe this ones boy friend. if they were in Western US or Canada. But Fla.

From: Carnivore
11-Jun-15
After Bigdan's post, I'm almost afraid to ask. What kind of metal plug?

From: NvaGvUp
12-Jun-15
Eight possibly, more likely nine.

But as others have said, you really can't tell much from the photo other than that he's a shooter without even thinking about it!

From: Ambush
12-Jun-15
"What kind of metal plug?"

Not exactly sure but likely for the past forty years, every NA ram had to have a small metal plug, with a serial number, inserted into one of the horns. It's smaller than a dime, on the surface, and is cylinder shaped. A hole is drilled and the plug inserted to register the ram

It is possible that there are a few around without it, from long ago or pick ups that were kept and never recorded.

With the way the mass carries through on that ram, I'd be willing to bet there are a few rings stacked close at the base.

From: TD
13-Jun-15
I think Carnivore was angling down another line of questioning.... heheheheh...

Not really a NA sheep guy, but I'd like to see some measurements or reference. That curl is really tight, on the sheep your looking at like a 1 1/2 curl? It's about a 1 1/4 just sitting on the table. Little to no brooming?

From: Ambush
13-Jun-15
Well after very little research I found I'm out to lunch on when mandatory plugging started. Thirty five years ago for Alberta bighorns and as recently as 2004 for Alaska's rams. Haven't found anything yet for BC sheep. Too tedious on a cell phone.

From: Carnivore
14-Jun-15
Thanks Ambush. They're kinda like a seal for a bear hide or a tail tag for a gator, but permanent. If I can get measurements or a tag number, I'll share it.

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