Garmin Xero Bow Sight
In Zimbabwe, We Don't Cry For Lions
International
Contributors to this thread:
No Mercy 05-Aug-15
Medicinemann 05-Aug-15
Bear Track 05-Aug-15
Mt. man 05-Aug-15
No Mercy 05-Aug-15
Bushwacker 05-Aug-15
SixLomaz 05-Aug-15
Sage Buffalo 05-Aug-15
Brotsky 05-Aug-15
XMan 05-Aug-15
Bushwacker 05-Aug-15
Brotsky 05-Aug-15
bigeasygator 05-Aug-15
Drahthaar 05-Aug-15
DL 05-Aug-15
writer 05-Aug-15
Jack Harris 05-Aug-15
TD 05-Aug-15
No Mercy 05-Aug-15
stagetek 05-Aug-15
nvgoat 06-Aug-15
Bill Obeid 06-Aug-15
From: No Mercy
05-Aug-15

No Mercy's Link
Probably the best thing I've read since this all came about:

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR In Zimbabwe, We Don’t Cry for Lions

787 By GOODWELL NZOU AUGUST 4, 2015 Winston-Salem, N.C. — MY mind was absorbed by the biochemistry of gene editing when the text messages and Facebook posts distracted me.

So sorry about Cecil.

Did Cecil live near your place in Zimbabwe?

Cecil who? I wondered. When I turned on the news and discovered that the messages were about a lion killed by an American dentist, the village boy inside me instinctively cheered: One lion fewer to menace families like mine.

Protesters have called for the death of the hunter who killed Cecil the lion. ERIC MILLER / REUTERS My excitement was doused when I realized that the lion killer was being painted as the villain. I faced the starkest cultural contradiction I’d experienced during my five years studying in the United States.

Did all those Americans signing petitions understand that lions actually kill people? That all the talk about Cecil being “beloved” or a “local favorite” was media hype? Did Jimmy Kimmel choke up because Cecil was murdered or because he confused him with Simba from “The Lion King”?

In my village in Zimbabwe, surrounded by wildlife conservation areas, no lion has ever been beloved, or granted an affectionate nickname. They are objects of terror.

When I was 9 years old, a solitary lion prowled villages near my home. After it killed a few chickens, some goats and finally a cow, we were warned to walk to school in groups and stop playing outside. My sisters no longer went alone to the river to collect water or wash dishes; my mother waited for my father and older brothers, armed with machetes, axes and spears, to escort her into the bush to collect firewood.

A week later, my mother gathered me with nine of my siblings to explain that her uncle had been attacked but escaped with nothing more than an injured leg. The lion sucked the life out of the village: No one socialized by fires at night; no one dared stroll over to a neighbor’s homestead.

When the lion was finally killed, no one cared whether its murderer was a local person or a white trophy hunter, whether it was poached or killed legally. We danced and sang about the vanquishing of the fearsome beast and our escape from serious harm.

Recently, a 14-year-old boy in a village not far from mine wasn’t so lucky. Sleeping in his family’s fields, as villagers do to protect crops from the hippos, buffalo and elephants that trample them, he was mauled by a lion and died.

The killing of Cecil hasn’t garnered much more sympathy from urban Zimbabweans, although they live with no such danger. Few have ever seen a lion, since game drives are a luxury residents of a country with an average monthly income below $150 cannot afford.

Don’t misunderstand me: For Zimbabweans, wild animals have near- mystical significance. We belong to clans, and each clan claims an animal totem as its mythological ancestor. Mine is Nzou, elephant, and by tradition, I can’t eat elephant meat; it would be akin to eating a relative’s flesh. But our respect for these animals has never kept us from hunting them or allowing them to be hunted. (I’m familiar with dangerous animals; I lost my right leg to a snakebite when I was 11.)

The American tendency to romanticize animals that have been given actual names and to jump onto a hashtag train has turned an ordinary situation — there were 800 lions legally killed over a decade by well- heeled foreigners who shelled out serious money to prove their prowess — into what seems to my Zimbabwean eyes an absurdist circus.

PETA is calling for the hunter to be hanged. Zimbabwean politicians are accusing the United States of staging Cecil’s killing as a “ploy” to make our country look bad. And Americans who can’t find Zimbabwe on a map are applauding the nation’s demand for the extradition of the dentist, unaware that a baby elephant was reportedly slaughtered for our president’s most recent birthday banquet.

We Zimbabweans are left shaking our heads, wondering why Americans care more about African animals than about African people.

Don’t tell us what to do with our animals when you allowed your own mountain lions to be hunted to near extinction in the eastern United States. Don’t bemoan the clear-cutting of our forests when you turned yours into concrete jungles.

And please, don’t offer me condolences about Cecil unless you’re also willing to offer me condolences for villagers killed or left hungry by his brethren, by political violence, or by hunger.

Goodwell Nzou is a doctoral student in molecular and cellular biosciences at Wake Forest University.

From: Medicinemann
05-Aug-15
Thank you for sharing this article.....

From: Bear Track
05-Aug-15
This is so well done. Why is there no tv camera or reporter there to give the story some balance?......Right their career may be tarnished with the truth.

From: Mt. man
05-Aug-15
Hmmmmmm?

From: No Mercy
05-Aug-15
It's not getting major coverage, because it doesn't fit into the agenda of the majority of the media.

From: Bushwacker
05-Aug-15
I will copy and paste this, print it out here at work for others to read. Thanks

From: SixLomaz
05-Aug-15
Put it on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and all other social media venues then. The information is in our hands now. Who needs the media anymore?

From: Sage Buffalo
05-Aug-15
This is going around FB. People are reading it.

The reality is I have decided there are 3 type of people responding to the issue:

1. Anti-Hunters: This was just a easy target and they are making hay while the sun is shinning.

2. People with Good Intentions/Clueless about Hunting & Africa: Nothing wrong with these people. Good people who think they are on the right side but since they don't hunt or never left their hometown are making some big assumptions.

3. Hunters: We are defending what we love and our rights.

I think the people we need to influence the most are #2. The anti's will only come around when they want to - which may be a looooong time from now.

From: Brotsky
05-Aug-15
I read this in the times this morning, wonderful article. I shared it on Facebook and several other places as well. Excellent article.

From: XMan
05-Aug-15
just shared it on Facebook, can't wait to see the responses, actually I am looking forward to it.

From: Bushwacker
05-Aug-15
If you go to the link, then also read the comments being posted. The anti's are attacking him as well.

From: Brotsky
05-Aug-15
The anti's are also their own worst enemy. If we stay out of the gutter and keep putting the positive message out there eventually the crazy always rises to the top and they hurt their own cause.

From: bigeasygator
05-Aug-15
It's a great article, it also highlights the challenges lions face. Just like no one wanted to live with wolves, bears, and lions as this country was populated, most Africans don't want lions around. Just like the wolf situation in the West, it's people far removed from the consequences of living with these animals that are expecting those that are to tolerate them.

The last thing I want is for lions to be killed off. It's clear we need to incentivize the locals to tolerate lions and help them coexist. Hunting revenue is far and away the most effective way to do this across the lion's range.

From: Drahthaar
05-Aug-15
Thanks for posting. the Truth if I have ever read it. Forrest

From: DL
05-Aug-15

DL's embedded Photo
DL's embedded Photo

From: writer
05-Aug-15
Gotta hand it to the New York Times for running it, though.

That's a big market, and one that had been pretty one-sided with their reporting last week.

Wish they'd have run it sooner than later, but later than never.

That's impressive, these days.

Bravo Times, this time.

So how many of you guys have already sent "atta boy" and "thanks for showing another side" letters to the editor at the Times?

Put a similar comment on the bottom of the article?

Huh?

Anybody?

You know what the other side is doing, big time.

Seriously, now's your chance to state your opinion.

From: Jack Harris
05-Aug-15

Jack Harris's embedded Photo
Jack Harris's embedded Photo

From: TD
05-Aug-15

TD's embedded Photo
TD's embedded Photo

From: No Mercy
05-Aug-15

No Mercy's embedded Photo
No Mercy's embedded Photo

From: stagetek
05-Aug-15
Best yet ! I'm passing this on to everyone I know. This is the "positive" that must come out of this.

From: nvgoat
06-Aug-15
stagetek X2. Send to everyone.

From: Bill Obeid
06-Aug-15
That was a great op/ed piece. Sent it to many and sent the New York Times a thank you for printing that letter.

Exit.......irrational emotion

Enter.......common sense.

  • Sitka Gear