Sitka Mountain Gear
Shot Gun Experts...Help!
Turkey
Contributors to this thread:
coelker 11-Apr-16
Buskill 11-Apr-16
coelker 11-Apr-16
jims 11-Apr-16
drycreek 11-Apr-16
GF 11-Apr-16
GF 11-Apr-16
shark 11-Apr-16
coelker 12-Apr-16
deerman406 12-Apr-16
Glunt@work 12-Apr-16
samman 12-Apr-16
air leak 12-Apr-16
bradbear 12-Apr-16
Zbone 12-Apr-16
bradbear 12-Apr-16
writer 12-Apr-16
Mad_Angler 12-Apr-16
XMan 12-Apr-16
coelker 12-Apr-16
Duke 12-Apr-16
bradbear 12-Apr-16
Pat Lefemine 12-Apr-16
GF 12-Apr-16
Zbone 12-Apr-16
writer 12-Apr-16
Zbone 12-Apr-16
Oakie 12-Apr-16
spike78 12-Apr-16
TradbowBob 12-Apr-16
spike78 12-Apr-16
Grunt-N-Gobble 12-Apr-16
WV Mountaineer 12-Apr-16
hobbes 12-Apr-16
PeroteHunter 12-Apr-16
Buffalo1 12-Apr-16
snapcrackpop 12-Apr-16
Candor 12-Apr-16
Zbone 13-Apr-16
Fuzzy 13-Apr-16
Fuzzy 13-Apr-16
bradbear 13-Apr-16
Zbone 13-Apr-16
writer 13-Apr-16
Grunt-N-Gobble 13-Apr-16
Zbone 17-Apr-16
stuckintherut 19-Apr-16
aboks 19-Apr-16
Thornton 19-Apr-16
Stickhead 19-Apr-16
buzz mc 19-Apr-16
ben h 20-Apr-16
Julius K 20-Apr-16
From: coelker
11-Apr-16
Yes I know this is bowsite, but this is really the only place I use for advice.

My 9 year old daughter got a Stroeger 20 Guage Side x side for her birthday in 3" chamber. Unfortunately, it only came with an C and M choke tube. She wants to turkey hunt with the gun as a result I am trying to figure out the right chokes.

I believe from research any Winchester style choke tube will fit, but with a side by side can we use a typical turkey choke that extends beyond the barrel? My gut says no.

Also we were practicing and had some 3" shells and some 2 3/4 shells. We used up the 3" shells but on the very first 2 3/4 the break action got locked shut and would not clear. I have to disassemble the gun to clear the shell by taking forearm off etc. Is there something I may have missed?

Also do they make a reduced load turkey ammo that she could use for less kick. She did not like the 20 guage 3" loads, but they can work.

From: Buskill
11-Apr-16
Why are you thinking a choke tube that extends some won't work ?

From: coelker
11-Apr-16
Buskill just never aw them on a side by side and wonder about interference between barrels? Not sure just wondering

From: jims
11-Apr-16
If a bird is at 30 yards a choke likely won't matter! One thing you could do is shoot several shots yourself (rather than her) on paper and see how different patterns with chokes work at different yardages. You could also try 2 3/4 vs 3" loads to see if there is much difference?

From: drycreek
11-Apr-16
When my youngest was practicing for his first turkey hunt at eight, I only let him practice with low powered 2 3/4" loads. Come time to shoot a turkey, he never noticed the 3" load. As to the chokes, try them and see, but as jims said, at 30 yards the mod will kill a turkey given the right load. Invest in some premium turkey loads, they're worth it ! And good luck !

From: GF
11-Apr-16
Man, I didn't start shooting 'til I was 13 and a 20 ga. was a LOT of gun. Granted, I was a flyweight and so was my Win 37A Youth model single, but just the same.... Seems like a kid could develop a helluva flinch.

I wouldn't allow my kid to do the patterning, etc. Too easy for awful habits to develop.

I'd expect that the choke tubes would have to interfere with each other before you'd have anything to worry about, but to Jim's' point, a modified choke and a load of lead sixes at 25-30 yards is probably going to pattern just fine. She's a new Hunter and (JMO) there are few things that take as much enjoyment out of it (especially for a newcomer) as getting a cripple, so why not call the bird into bow range and fog him out? Lots less pressure on the kid to be real accurate and probably a less gory trophy as well.

One other thought.... I have NEVER, EVER heard of a break-action gun jamming or locking up. I'd see a gunsmith before I did ANYTHING.

From: GF
11-Apr-16
Man, I didn't start shooting 'til I was 13 and a 20 ga. was a LOT of gun. Granted, I was a flyweight and so was my Win 37A Youth model single, but just the same.... Seems like a kid could develop a helluva flinch.

I wouldn't allow my kid to do the patterning, etc. Too easy for awful habits to develop.

I'd expect that the choke tubes would have to interfere with each other before you'd have anything to worry about, but to Jim's' point, a modified choke and a load of lead sixes at 25-30 yards is probably going to pattern just fine. She's a new Hunter and (JMO) there are few things that take as much enjoyment out of it (especially for a newcomer) as getting a cripple, so why not call the bird into bow range and fog him out? Lots less pressure on the kid to be real accurate and probably a less gory trophy as well.

One other thought.... I have NEVER, EVER heard of a break-action gun jamming or locking up. I'd see a gunsmith before I did ANYTHING.

From: shark
11-Apr-16
coelker

There are a lot of misconceptions about shotguns. One of them is that a 20 gauge has less recoil than a 12. I see a lot of parents introduce the kids to the shooting sports using 20 gauges and then loading them up with magnum shells. I bet your stoeger has a hard plastic recoil pad, add the 3" shells and it kicks like a mule.

The 12 gauge has a much wider variety of shells available, from very low recoil 2 3/4 to 3 1/2 magnums, so shooting a 12 gauge does not mean heavy recoil. It also means you can use it for many kinds of shooting

I don't want to sound mean but I wish your 9 yr old was not shooting this gun. She will never forget how hard this thing kicks. The best shotguns for low recoil are the autos. The way they are designed, much of the recoil is taken up in the mechanics of the gun. The Barettas and Benellis are great autos and they come in youth models, they can cycle low recoil ammo with no problems.

As far as chokes go, most people seem to use full chokes on turkeys. I would encourage you to get some cardboard and draw a 30" circle on it, with a dot in the center. Step back to 30 yds and shoot at the dot with the modified choke. This will give you an idea how many pellets are in your 30" pattern. If you see big holes in the pattern, go to a tighter choke. Remember as you go tighter the pattern gets smaller and the shooter needs to be more precise.

coelker make sure whatever she shoots fits her. The stock may be too long and need cutting down, or she may not be looking down the middle of the barrel. These are important details and any gunsmith can help with this.

Hope this is not too technical, but it is important to start them off on the right foot.

Good luck with the turkeys and the shotgun

From: coelker
12-Apr-16
Thanks guys. I figured out the break action issue was most likely a safety position error on our end of the deal. She was able to handle 3" bird shot with minimal problems, but only wanted to shoot a few times. The 2.75 was no problem, but like mentioned the break locked up. What I found was the the lever is supposed to move the safety to the safe position before the break is allowed to open. In our case we never got the safety fully applied to allow the break to work.

Safety issue solved. As far as fit, the stock has been cut and reduced and modified to take a benelli style recoil reduction tube.

I was looking at the Hevi-Shot Magnum BlandRecoil Reduction.

I was hoping to take what I have and make it as good as possible. She has shot a lot but has not handled the lager size of a shot gun much.

I will have her shooting light bird loads for practice. After shooting last time she is looking forward to next time and that was with 3" loads and before the recoil reduction tube.

From: deerman406
12-Apr-16
First can she handle the 3" load without causing flinching problems that may last a long time. If she can then I would shoot 3"ers with the modified choke tube, the tight turkey chokes even kick a bit more. With the modified choke and #5 shot she will be fine to 30 yards. I would think out of a blind 30 yards is not an issue and most likely closer. If you go with 2-3/4" then go to number 4 shot and 25 yards and in. My grandson killed his first bird in the fall with a Stoeger O/U 20 gauge with 2-3/4" shell and # 8 shot, we were squirrel hunting and a big hen came to 15 yards, he had a tag and I told him to shoot. Dead bird real quick. Don't over think it, get a bird close and she will do fine. Shawn

From: Glunt@work
12-Apr-16
Stoeger side by sides interchange with Winchester, Browning Invector and Mossberg 500 tubes.

For what's it's worth, my boy took a tom at 29 yards last year with 3" #5 and modified choke.

From: samman
12-Apr-16
I have a Stoeger SXS myself with both the 20 & 12 gauge barrels. My Mossberg chokes fit fine. My old Mossberg 500 chokes extend past the barrel about 1/4" on the 12ga. and they work fine.

From: air leak
12-Apr-16
Pattern the gun yourself using 3 in mags, and have your daughter practice shoot using low brass 2 3/4 in shells.

When it's time to hunt, load it with the 3 in mag shells.

Keep the shot to 30 yards or less.

Once she squeezes the trigger on a bird, she won't notice the difference.

Good luck, and when she kills a bird, post the pictures.

From: bradbear
12-Apr-16
If you are looking for chokes for it give William at SumToy chokes a call he is very good to work with and will keep exchanging tell you find what you like. I set up a Weatherby Sa o8 youth 20 gauge just for youth hunts, it uses the same Win chokes. Mine shoots GREAT at 40 yards with Fed heavy weight 7's or Hevi shot 7's. i actually threw a slip on pad on it last year and shot a few birds with it myself. Now as I have it set up it shoots very tight up close and I do have a red dot on it. The 10 year old girl I had out this last weekend for our learn to hunt program shot her bird at under 10 yards. Like people said single shots can kick like hell, the semi is less but as said with magnum shells in a light little gun can still give a good kick. People above have you on the right track. I have 3 buddies that after shooting the sao8 set up guns the same just for the Learn to hunt we do.

From: Zbone
12-Apr-16
"C" indicates cylinder, or open or no choke (the widest pattern that barrel will spread shot)... "M" indicates, Modified, a midrange shot pattern...

Regardless of what length shotshells she can handle, I'd go buy at least a "F" or full choke tube, or maybe even a Full, and Extra Full choke tubes for turkeys. You want the tightest pattern you can get, especially in a 20 gauge...

From: bradbear
12-Apr-16

bradbear's embedded Photo
bradbear's embedded Photo

From: writer
12-Apr-16
OK, most of this you know, so I'm not going to assume you need the lecture about tight patterns for turkeys.

-- If you need tighter than the current tubes will get you, remember you can go to steel shot and it will be tighter. So will most "hevi" materials.

-- Winchester makes a 2 3/4" buffered load of 1 1/8" 7 1/2 that carries more than enough wallop to 30 yards.

-- The #7 hevis sound perfect.

-- Great hearing protection does a lot to combat flinching. With most kids that's foam plugs, plus muffs when shooting targets.

-- Any target that shows a physical reaction to the shot also takes their mind off of recoil (never call it kick). A pop can is about the size of a turkey's head and part of the neck, and placed on a stick it will fly quite a ways when shot. Kids love to count the pellet holes, too.

-- If you're going with 3", you should be able to go with a 2 3/4" trap load of #8s and get about the same pellet count for practicing.

-- Pattern both barrels to make sure they impact the same location on a patterning sheet.

-- A 20 gauge can make a great turkey gun. Both of my kids did their Grand Slams primarily with 20s, my daughter completely. Son's 870 youth, with an extended choke, is death to 35 yards. I've carried it on many turkey hunts since he's moved to his 12. I've killed 8-10 with it, and probably 8-10 kids have killed their first with it, too.

-- For about the pat 12 or so years Rob Keck, guy who really got NWTF going strong and one of the three best turkey hunters I've ever had the education to hunt with, has used a little 20 semi auto and the hevi shots. He's good to 40 yards, though seldom shoots past 20...he's that good.

-- Have fun and involve your daughter in all of the decisions. My kids remember as much about all of the prep, and fun, getting ready for their first seasons as the birds they killed.

From: Mad_Angler
12-Apr-16
I agree with almost all the previous advice. My daughter has killed 3 turkeys and here is what I did:

Started with a 20 gauge and then moved to a 12 guage.

I sighted in both guns before taking her out.

For the 20 gauge, I used the factory choke. For the 12 gauge, I used my tight turkey choke.

She only shot a few light loads while sighting in. I put in the larger shells when hunting and she never noticed the difference.

Another tip: I bring a tripod with a gun saddle on it. That way, the gun is very stable and she can aim accurately and easily. Even at 20 yards, I think it is way to hard for a small child to hold up a heavy gun and keep it steady.

From: XMan
12-Apr-16
x2 on writer, and definitely x2 on Mad Anglers suggestion get a tripod shooting stick!

From: coelker
12-Apr-16
Cool thanks guys. I ordered a set of choke tubes but will also order another set as well. The tubes in the gun were both improved cylinders and the shot pattern at 20 yards was not very good at all. As a result I ordered a full and extra full but will also add in a modified as well. Then I will head to the range and sight in myself.

I bought the Shoot N See turkey targets for her to practice and will be using some 2 3/4 loads for her practice.

She always shoots off a set of sticks, but even with sticks the gun is a little heavy and hard to move. As a result I am looking at a tripod and rifle groove top for better stability.

I will keep you all posted. We ran out of time this spring so turkey hunting is happening now, but she realizes she is not ready yet.

From: Duke
12-Apr-16
Some great info above. I would be reluctant to use too tight of a choke tube as your goal is to get a bird in close and if the choke tube is too tight you may very well be throwing a softball sized pattern at a thin (possibly slightly moving) target. Tighter chokes are great for stoning birds at 40-50 yards, but can be very problematic close!

Modified is a great choke for beginners and anyone who vows to shoot only the birds that actually commit to the decoy. There's no need to get crazy with choke tubes.

Make certain to pattern the load with the gun and tube you will use. Each perform different. Good luck.

From: bradbear
12-Apr-16
I agree Duke. And this weekend as the 3 toms came straight at us tight together not providing a shot for her tell they were inside the decoys I actually told her to body shoot it. At that range I didn't want to chance missing that turkey head with basically a slug. She blew a hole straight through its side. It did unfortunately loose a little breast meat on one side. Everything we do is a trade off in gun set ups, shells,etc. But I will still take a tighter set up just incase and do like the red dot for the new hunters as less chance of not having head down and still seeing the front bead. Allows it to be aimed a bit more and not pointed

From: Pat Lefemine
12-Apr-16
Glad to see that archer's aren't the only ones overthinking everything!

I've shot about 30 turkeys with my bow. Two years ago I decided to try turkey hunting with a shotgun. I had no idea what I was doing and grabbed my 3,5" Hevi-shot 'dead coyote' magnum rounds and took to the woods. Called a big tom into 10 yards and shot a golf-ball sized hole into the base of his neck. Great fun.

Last year I got my Sh**t together and did it right, Killed a turkey the second day out at 10 yards again - with #5 Federal 3.5" magnum turkey rounds. Not quite stone dead like my previous bird with the see-thru hole but still a dead bird nonetheless.

Bottom line, the 20 will be fine for her with the stock choke. And she'll never notice the recoil since she will be so blown out with adrenaline. Keep the shots close and all will be fine. If she is going to be practicing or dong skeet shooting - then by all means consider an auto. My 3.5" shotgun kicks as bad as .50cal bolt action. Killer!

From: GF
12-Apr-16
I was just thinking to mention the tighter patterns with steel, so glad it was brought up. Just thinking that a 3" load of steel could up your pellet count, but so would a smaller size in the high density stuff. In the end, it's the weight of the charge that does the kicking....

Makes me wonder, though.... Since trajectory is not usually an issue for shotgunners and since pellet deformation degrades pattern consistency, would a reduced powder charge and a big load of #5 or #6 lead pellets hit the sweet spot for recoil & knockdown???

And one other thought... Does that Stoeger have a barrel selector? You could experiment with tubes and loads and maybe come up with one barrel for up close and the other for farther out. Just gotta make sure you're keeping track of which is which...

From: Zbone
12-Apr-16
On shot size selection, I understand there are two theories of thought of #7-1/2 or #4 shot... Personally, the only thing I'd shoot #7-1/2's at are clay targets, small birds like blackbirds, quail, doves, and first shot at ruffed grouse... Those weak little pellets do nothing but cripple game any bigger UNLESS at close range, but anything over 25 yards or so with 7-1/2's, your just asking to cripple game...

Personally I wouldn't shoot at a turkey with anything smaller than #4 birdshot... Have had bad turkey experiences with both #5's and #6's...

Shhhhh, don't tell anybody but number 4 buckshot is just plain freakn MEAN... It'll crumble a 25 pound gobbler on the fly like feather dusting a blackbird with a blast of #8's... Believe me, I'm talkn graveyard dead... With turkeys, after #4 birdshot, my backup shot is always #4 buck... Read your regs though, cause I don't think it legal in all states...

From: writer
12-Apr-16
Z...never seen a turkey crippled if shot in the head and neck out to 35-40 yards with 7 1/2s, and you get about twice as many pellets per ounce over 4s. Body shoot one with 7 1/2s and most times the pellets won't penetrate enough to do serious damage.

I've seen a few hundred shotgunned, and shot size doesn't have as much to do with things as shot location.Most where shot with fives or sixes.

Fours out of a 20 gauge sure don't give much pattern density. Generally, the more open the choke and/or smaller the gauge, the smaller the pellets so you have that density.

One year I was in on 25 kills in five states, and the average shooting distance was around 18 yards. The joy is seeing how close you can get them, not how far.

I've seen them crippled when body shot with about anything, if it's past 20 yards. One of my best-spurred birds had breast and thighs coated with a load of #2s.

We live in shotgun country, and have seen many fall birds folded like a clean pair of socks by pheasant or duck loads. I have buddies who do better than 90-percent of hunters with a 28 gauge and 7 1/2 on wild pheasants and prairie grouse. The key is where, and how well you hit them.

As an old Scotsman told me, "...hit 'em in the head, the ass dies instantly."

Keep us posted coelker....

From: Zbone
12-Apr-16
Should have clarified... #4 birdshot to the HEAD ONLY, and as said backup shots with number 4 buck are usually running or flying body shots and the reason I only load one #4 birdshot up front, the rest are buck... Buckshot will penetrate clear though a turkey's body at 40 - 50 yards, as said, it's mean stuff, especially out of a 12 gauge 3" magnum with a Super Full Turkey choke... Sorta like Pat's 'dead coyote' only meaner... (I think 'dead coyote' is only T's or F's, don't remember, would have to look it up)

3" number 4 buck 12 gauge is 41 buffered .24 caliber projectiles traveling over 1200 FSP... Buck don't cripple, it crushes...

But as said, there are 2 trains of thought for head shots, 7 1/2's or 4's, when it comes to firearms, usually, bigger is better for me... Personally, there is no way I'd shoot 40 yards with 7 1/2s at a turkey, only asking for cripples, there isn't enough energy in those itty bitty pellets at that range... Think of arrow penetration and arrow weight... But, we could go on and on...

From: Oakie
12-Apr-16

Oakie's embedded Photo
Oakie's embedded Photo
Seems like too much worry.

My dad got me a 20g youth gun with a modified choke when I was 10. I killed my first deer with it using a slug. The deer was at 40 yards. 32 years later, my 8 year old took his first turkey with the same gun this weekend. The gun only chambers 2 3/4 with M choke. The decoys were set 15 yards from the blind, the bird came right to them, and he hit the bird in the head and killed it instantly.

From: spike78
12-Apr-16
Try Winchester long beard ammo in size6 shot. At 20 yards it makes a super tight pattern with my xtra full choke and I actually prefer to shoot a bird 30 yards away with it due to the tightness. If you only have a modified choke try it and it may be perfect at 20 yards. The shot is unreal and beats the hevi shot I used to use. Make sure it says long beard on the box as the other Winchester loads shot horrible.

From: TradbowBob
12-Apr-16
I kill turkeys all the time with a 20 with 2/34" #5. You'll probably have a better shooter if she's not flinching.

I would look for a full choke and keep your shots to within 30 yards.

Have fun.

TBB

From: spike78
12-Apr-16
Also from what I have noticed with patterning various loads is that the 3.5" pattern worse than the others so in my experience bigger shell is not better. Try the 3".

12-Apr-16
Man....... I could really make some of you fellas scratch your head if I told you guys are killing turkeys at 50 & 60 yards using 8s, 8.5s and 9 shot.

It's all in the type of shot you use and it's density. Can't be bought in a store. It's all hand loaded.

12-Apr-16
I'd recommend the hevi-shot loads. They call for a less constricted choke tube and, kick 1/3 as hard as other shells. They usually deliver phenomenal patterns too.

A properly patterned 20 gauge is a great turkey weapon. Also, a 2 3/4" turkey shell, shoots harder than a 3 inch. More room for powder.

Lot's of misconceptions involving gauge and, shell lengths in turkey shells. The only thing the 20 gives up is the amount of pellets to reach the same velocity as a 12 gauge. And, if you get it shooting right, that isn't a concern. God Bless

From: hobbes
12-Apr-16
My kids started with a 20 ga. 870 Jr. (1" shorter pull and 1.5" shorter barrel than the Youth model) at about 9 years old. All practice was done wearing ear protection and low brass ammo. All the patterning with turkey loads was done by me. They never took notice of the heavier ammo at go time.

As far as ammo and choke: We wanted as much shot as possible. With lead we used a cheap Undertaker choke tube and 3" #6. 30 yards was about the limit as far as pattern goes with lead. The best patterning ammo/choke combo has been a jellyhead choke and #7 Hevi Shot. It will stomp a turkey head to 35 yards pushing 40 all day long. I suspect that #7 federal HW will perform well also.

#4s are likely not going to perform well as far as pattern goes. Someone should have told the thousands of birds killed to 40 yards with #6s annually that they don't work. If I was going to #7s Id go high density and you'll have no problems. In the majority of states #4 buck is illegal and some have "no smaller than" limits as well. Shotgunning turkeys is solely a head shot game.

From: PeroteHunter
12-Apr-16
My kids both started using the 870 youth. #7 Hevi Shot as well in 2 3/4" shells, and a TruGlo Gobble Stopper choke. I also use the same combination on my 12 gauge 870. Turkeys in Kansas, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama have all been 1 shot kills out to 45 yards.

From: Buffalo1
12-Apr-16

Buffalo1's Link
See recoil values at the bottom of the article. See attached link. This gives you the recoil values of gauges and loads. Hope this will help.

From: snapcrackpop
12-Apr-16
Could the firing pin have become stuck in the primer? Causing the locking problem?

From: Candor
12-Apr-16
If you want a 20 gauge long range killer check out the TSS handloads. Good recipes available and you probably have a friend that will load them for you.

When you are shooting anything with a shotgun it's not pellet size that matters but weight of each pellet strike along with # of pellet strikes.

You can't simply decrease your shot size to increase your lethality unless you go to a higher density shot at the same time.

Lead (11.1 g/cc) is more dense than steel (7.9 g/cc) Hevi-shot (~12 g/cc) is more dense than lead TSS (18 g/cc) is more dense than Hevi by 50%.

I have never shot a turkey past 30 yards but I find it interesting to piddle with this.

So you could shoot hevi or lead or TSS. I wouldn't shoot steel unless I really reduced my range. There are a lot of folks killing gobblers with .410.

Shooting the TSS the 9s or 8x9s are a popular load and gets the pellet count really up there.

All that said, my son hunts with the factory full in his 20 with 5 shot. We keep his shots to 20 yards.

Patterning turkey loads is a miserable experience. I usually feel like someone has rapped my head with a hammer and my brain is bouncing off my skull.

From: Zbone
13-Apr-16
Candor - Totally agree, its all about striking weight... My posts was speaking strictly of lead, been a long time since I bought or handloaded turkey loads, and before Hevi shot, and haven't even tried Hevi shot yet... First I've ever heard of TSS, will have to google and check out... Thanks for the info

From: Fuzzy
13-Apr-16
Check your game laws before using buckshot on turkey. Illegal in VA

From: Fuzzy
13-Apr-16

From: bradbear
13-Apr-16
TSS are the real deal. and I am sure what gobble and grunt is hinting at. Tiny super heavy pellets that hit harder then most 4's.

From: Zbone
13-Apr-16
Wow, that TSS is some bad a$$ stuff... Been quite a while since I've reloaded, thanks for sharing...

Question with TSS, haven't had time yet to research, but can you use tight restricted chokes with TSS or do you need to more open chokes as with steel?...Thanks

From: writer
13-Apr-16
...aren't those youth model 870s amazing little shotguns?

Our son shot limits of doves with his when he was 9, and eventually hundreds of ducks and big geese.

All these years later, he'll tell you his shooting percentages were higher back then with the tiny 20 rather than his big magnum 12.

13-Apr-16
Zbone - I load Hevishot, Heavyweight and TSS. To answer your question, it typically requires a more open choke to get tighter patterns. A tighter choke usually blows out the pattern, though there are a few exceptions, namely using an Indian Creek choke in .665 for a Remington.

My own Rem. 11-87, shooting a 3" shell, does very well with a .682 choke. It's a custom Sumtoy choke, but I've read that standard Rem chokes and Carlsons in the same approx dia do very well too.

I don't bowhunt for turkeys and really don't see me doing so anytime soon as I really enjoy gun hunting for them. If you want to learn a ton of info on TSS shot, look up the Gobbler Nation website.

From: Zbone
17-Apr-16
Grunt-N-Gobble - Thanks for the info, will check it out...

19-Apr-16
Sounds to me like your putting way to much thought in to this. 3 inch mags are not needed. A few years ago shoulder surgery kept me from pulling my bow. I shot two turkeys that year one handed left handed with my 20 gauge Montifeltro using low base game loads 6s.

My 6 year old daughter killed 3 turkeys this year with her .410 Mossberg mini bantam using 2.5 inch 6s. Each shot was about 20 yards and dropped em all dead.

Too much recoil will cause her to flinch and miss. Shooting and hunting should be fun not painfull.

good luck hope she has a lot of fun

From: aboks
19-Apr-16
http://www.fieldandstream.com/articles/hunting/2012/04/problems-caused-supersized-turkey-loads-and-light-and-lethal-loads-you-shou

check out this article- my 7 year old went to Nebraska last year and killed 3 toms, and this year he shot 2 toms, with the Fiocchi Golden Pheasant 2 3/4" that's listed as the last one in the article.

We limit shots to 30 yards. Never had a problem, just pattern it with your chokes. Hes is using a Remington 870 with an Undertaker Turkey Choke. Hes 50 lbs soaking wet and does fine with it.

From: Thornton
19-Apr-16
I use extended choke tubes in my beretta competition oever/under and there is no interference. Stop worrying so much about chokes and such. I shot my first turkey at age 13 with a $59 bolt action that I unknowingly had adjusted to improved cylinder choke.

From: Stickhead
19-Apr-16
Get her a cross gun.

From: buzz mc
19-Apr-16
I turkey hunt with a 20 gauge over and under.

In the top barrel, I shoot 3" Federal Mag-Shot Heavyweight #7's with Flitecontrol wad through a modified choke. This choke patterned the best with the factory chokes (C, IC, M, IM & F). I have patterned it and it is a 40 yard load in my gun. The Flitecontrol wad makes all the difference.

In the bottom barrel, I shoot any of the low brass #6's through an improved cylinder choke. This is my up close and personal barrel.

From: ben h
20-Apr-16
I have not shot much in the way of turkeys, but I have shot 1,000's of waterfowl. Growing up, being a lefty I didn't have much choice and shot a Beretta over and under. A few years ago I finally made the switch to a Benelli auto, and I can't believe how much the recoil is reduced with an auto. even with pretty hot 3.5" they're not bad. I didn't really mind the over and under either, but for someone who is pretty light, I can see how that could be a problem with the heavier loaded shells. Check the drams of powder not just the OZ of shot that's in the shells too.

From: Julius K
20-Apr-16
The last few turkeys I have killed with a shotgun were with my mossberg 500 20 gauge, standard full choke. 2 3/4" and 3" #6s. Dead birds out to 40 yards.

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