3Rivers Archery Supply
How Many Shirts?
Mountain Goat
Contributors to this thread:
BoggsBowhunts 24-May-16
WV Mountaineer 24-May-16
kota-man 24-May-16
BoggsBowhunts 24-May-16
SDHNTR(home) 24-May-16
SDHNTR(home) 24-May-16
Stekewood 24-May-16
BoggsBowhunts 24-May-16
SDHNTR(home) 24-May-16
Steve H. 24-May-16
Stekewood 24-May-16
BoggsBowhunts 24-May-16
Matt 24-May-16
BoggsBowhunts 24-May-16
kota-man 24-May-16
TXHunter 24-May-16
SDHNTR(home) 24-May-16
BoggsBowhunts 24-May-16
BoggsBowhunts 24-May-16
Matt 24-May-16
Steve H. 25-May-16
Jaquomo 25-May-16
Matt 25-May-16
Steve H. 25-May-16
Stekewood 25-May-16
elkstabber 25-May-16
Russell 25-May-16
ELKMAN 25-May-16
muskeg 25-May-16
razorhead 25-May-16
Florida Mike 25-May-16
elkstabber 25-May-16
Scar Finga 25-May-16
Steve H. 25-May-16
Grubby 25-May-16
willliamtell 25-May-16
g5smoke21 25-May-16
BoggsBowhunts 25-May-16
Stekewood 25-May-16
muskeg 25-May-16
TD 25-May-16
Nick Muche 25-May-16
Nick Muche 25-May-16
TD 26-May-16
Nick Muche 26-May-16
jims 29-May-16
Bou'bound 01-Jul-16
Blacktail Bob 01-Jul-16
24-May-16
Gearing up for my first mountain hunt, and was wondering how many base layers you guys typically bring on yours? It's a 7 day hunt and I was thinking for sure 2 base layer shirts, atleast. Probably a spare pair of baselayer pants too. Do you guys bring a couple mid-layer shirts as well? Probably a stupid question but I am completely new to anything other than climbing trees for Whitetails, lol. Might be able to get by with just one, but as I have said, I'm clueless. This question might have been answered before but I was unable to find it.

24-May-16
I have never been out west back pack hunting. But, I have been out west elk hunting from a base camp. I'd imagine if you are going in September, a lightweight merino wool or synthetic base layer for top and bottom, a good quick dry shirt, a good warm, compressible vest of primaloft, down, or the like, a decent pair of pants, and a good hard shell rain suit would cover you. Beanie, Ball cap, 2 pair of socks, and gloves. Personally, I'd bring extra under wear before more base layers. A fresh pair every couple days is nice when you are rustic camping. And Gold Bonds rocks to keep the funk down.

At the elevations I've hunted in September, nights are routinely cool in the upper teens to upper 20's but, it isn't uncommon to see the high 70's or 80's doing the day either. Been my experience too that you can expect rain at least one day in a 7 day period. The wind can be very intense.

I'm sure there are guys here that can give you better advice than I. But, that's how I'd go about it. One of the biggest things I've seen about out west is the lack of humidity really makes colder temps seem a lot warmer and, hot temps feel a lot better. Also, I work outside in the elements. I don't get cold easily either. So, that might factor into it too. God Bless

From: kota-man
24-May-16
Two Sitka Polygiene Short Sleeve T's and Two Mid Weights are all you need for a week or two.

24-May-16
The hunt will be 7 days at the end of October. Right now I'm planning on bringing a couple extra pairs of underwear and socks and an extra baselayer shirt (besides the rest of the set-up). Anymore "extras" I should throw in?

From: SDHNTR(home)
24-May-16
I'd bring 4 personally. 3 to hunt in and rotate and dry. One set for sleeping that NEVER leaves the tent. Having a dry set of base layers to get into and sleep could literally save your life.

From: SDHNTR(home)
24-May-16
Oh, and bring Leukotape! A serious game changer!

From: Stekewood
24-May-16
Are you going to be backpack hunting or hunting out of a base camp? Big difference in the packing list and "extras" for each type of hunt.

24-May-16
Stekewood, it'll be a backpack hunt SDHNTR, I'll bring it!

From: SDHNTR(home)
24-May-16
Oh, and bring Leukotape! A serious game changer!

From: Steve H.
24-May-16
More than one......on a goat hunt? Huh.

From: Stekewood
24-May-16
With the exception of socks, I tend to find myself wearing the same thing day in and day out on a backpack hunt. For me, one extra next to skin shirt would do it, and I might even not take that for a 7 dayer.

Liner socks are a great way to have the fresh sock feel without having to bring lots of extra pairs of heavy boot socks, and also help prevent blisters from starting. You can take 3 pairs for the same weight as one pair of good mountain boot socks, and keep the boot socks that you do have a lot fresher.

24-May-16
Steve H. Can you please explain? As I said before I haven't been on a backcountry hunt before and don't know what most guys pack.

Stekewood, Yes the liner socks is what I was talking about. I will bring a few different weight socks as well (A medium weight and a heavy weight)

From: Matt
24-May-16
The only pieces I would for sure take a second of are undies and socks - and maybe a base layer shirt. No reason for more than 1 of anything else.

24-May-16
Thanks Matt, that's what it is looking like I will pack.

From: kota-man
24-May-16
Matt doesn't sweat as much as me...

From: TXHunter
24-May-16
What Matt said. Overpacking for a 7 day backpack hunt is a common, but unnecessary, mistake made by many.

From: SDHNTR(home)
24-May-16
Where is this goat hun taking place? If the lower 48 with low likelihood of continuous rain, I'd agree, 1-2 max, is plenty. You'll likely have ample sunshine, or even a fire, to dry stuff out. If we are talking about coastal AK or BC, you will want those 3, with the spare dry set for sleeping. Trust me on this, I've been there. It takes forever for anything to dry out, if ever. Take multiple pairs of socks for the same reason.

24-May-16
Hunt is happening in Southern BC, out of Cranbrook. About 30 miles north of MT

24-May-16
SDHNTR, I apologize, your first message wasn't loading for me until just now. That explains Steve's post! But I definitely see the importance of keeping some clothes dry to sleep in, hadn't thought of that before but thank you! Will definitely do that as well.

From: Matt
24-May-16
That area is generally quite dry as compared to the coastal areas in BC and the air is probably thinner...

From: Steve H.
25-May-16
I don't take extra anything on goat hunts but accessing goats in Alaska where I hunt is h€[[. Undies these days dry out pronto so I guess I see no need for spares.

From: Jaquomo
25-May-16
What undies do you guys use? Seriously - something that is comfortable, can be stream washed and dried quickly, doesn't hold oogies that contribute to jock itch.

I would start a separate thread about that topic but it would likely degenerate into an argument with 200 posts..

Boggs, a suggestion from decades of experience: take along a small tube of antifungal cream. Probably won't need it but if you do it can save your hunt.

From: Matt
25-May-16
Define oogies, is that a medical term? ;-)

I use the Ex Officio boxer briefs and think they are outstanding in terms of being quick drying, comfortable, and resisting the funk.

From: Steve H.
25-May-16
EO or UA will work.

From: Stekewood
25-May-16
Ex Officious here also.

From: elkstabber
25-May-16
For a backpack hunt you don't want to duplicate any weight. I'd suggest that you pick one base layer shirt, one pair of boxer-briefs, and two pairs of socks (one light and one heavy). You can hike in the light socks and sleep in the heavy ones.

Take lots of pictures and make sure to share them here!

From: Russell
25-May-16
Merino wool for all that touches skin (socks, gloves, underwear (Icebreaker), etc).

Two pair 100 wt tops, one pair bottoms, and super down parka.

Think multi-purpose and multi-day wear on all clothing.

Good luck on the hunt.

From: ELKMAN
25-May-16
Just 2 of the Kuiu Ultra Merino will get you through easily, and their stuff is incredible!

From: muskeg
25-May-16
I take extra ... but I hunt SE Alaska. We always make a stash of clothes at the lower lake or drop point.

Vacuum seal your extra stuff in small portions. Actually we vacuum seal everything just about.

From: razorhead
25-May-16
remember ounces equal pounds and pounds equal pain,,,,, you do not need as much clothes as you think, also read backcountry hunting by Cameron Hanes and you can get an easy handle on what you need.......

From: Florida Mike
25-May-16
I take 2 pairs. One I use for sleeping if I get cold and the other for daily use. I use skins as a base layer then merino wool on top, then a mid layer or top layer depending on temps. The skins eliminate any itchy from the wool. Mike

From: elkstabber
25-May-16
Wait a minute here. BoggsBowhunts is going on his first backpack/mountain hunting trip and doing it for mountain goats? It will be an adventure for sure.

The best advice I can suggest (besides bringing me along) is to use your backpack gear and go camping beforehand somewhere to use all of your gear. A backpack hunt has a steep learning curve if you've never backpack camped. I understand that you are going with a guide but you can still lose a lot of valuable hunting opportunities while learning the camping skills. Your guide should (hopefully) be bringing all of the camping/cooking equipment. You should only be bringing your personal items like clothes and weapon and maybe a tent. DON'T BRING ANYTHING THAT YOU ABSOLUTELY DON'T NEED OR CAN'T BORROW FROM YOUR GUIDE.

A backpack camping trip will give you valuable experience with the gear that you will be using. It'll show you if your boots and pack fit as well as any number of other lessons that are best learned before using your valuable hunting time.

Take lots of pictures and share with us because very few of us will ever get to hunt mountain goats.

From: Scar Finga
25-May-16
X2 ElkStabber!

the advise I would give is... Try it out, and then try it out again, and then do it again! do one trip in the rain on purpose! see what works and what's broke! Also don't forget to put a couple super heavy duty contractor bags in your pack. They weigh nothing have a hundred different uses and can save your life if things go south. S.F.

From: Steve H.
25-May-16
"I take extra ... but I hunt SE Alaska. We always make a stash of clothes at the lower lake or drop point."

Agree and do the same but different than dragging extra nonsense up the mountain.

From: Grubby
25-May-16
On the underwear, I am liking core4element and mothwing partly because they are pretty affordable on camofire lately but first lite are my favorite.

From: willliamtell
25-May-16
All tech fabric, 2 ss, 1 ls. Keep in mind the ss you wear hiking in is going to be soaked and getting funky first day. One pr longjohns. No polystinkalene. Try to keep at least one pair dry/semi-clean as a backup. Late Oct backpack you will need topnotch extreme weather outer layer too (as good/light as you can afford).

From: g5smoke21
25-May-16
I'm going to BC next year. I am planning on bringing 2 pr on light weight first lite long sleeve shirts as well as 2 pr of light merino pants. Plus 1 pr of heavy first lite for cold temps for sleeping

25-May-16
Thanks for the input, guys! I go backpacking frequently, but usually only weekend trips, so didn't know what to expect for 5 more days.

Stabber, Yes he is providing all the camping/cooking equipment, all I need to bring is clothes/bow/etc. I plan on filming as much as possible, obviously not professionally or even "good" for most people's standards, lol, but I do hope to get most of the hikes/camp/stalks/hopefully kill on camera as possible. If the footage works out I will post that on here, if not then I will do a write up similar to the one Chasin Bugles is doing right now (although mine won't be the #2 Goat in Montana, that's a tough one to beat haha)

Scar, I will definitely do a practice trip in the rain, if not that then I will atleast get them wet and see how long they take to dry out. That's a good idea, I'm glad you mentioned it.

William, That's what I was thinking. I figured the baselayer I wore on the hike up would be pretty rank by the time I got up there, that's why I was planning on bringing 2 or 3. Thanks.

From: Stekewood
25-May-16
Look forward to the story!

From: muskeg
25-May-16

If it rains every day there will be no drying out anything. But being in SE BC it probably will be much dryer than to the west.

I actually have a problem with some of the suggestions with just one or two of about any clothing. You can go on a hunt and be as miserable as you want to be (like you are on a survival situation) or be as professionally comfortable as you want to be. There are a lot of very good products that work now-a-days.

Your guide will have the best answer to your questions.

From: TD
25-May-16
Was just going to mention, I've seen where Steve's goats are. Nothing is going to dry out on the mountain in a tiny little tent in 80% humidity unless you "wear it dry".

I think much of it is just getting used to funk and some degree of discomfort. Hygiene is highly overrated....=D That and you're going to be too tired to even think about changing clothes on some days....

WWBB do.... what would Blacktail Bob do? I surely couldn't answer for him, but i have an idea. I'm betting he might not even take his boots off on a 7 day goat hunt....

A thought about merino vs synthetic.... the merino is not going to stink as bad after several days, no contest. BUT my experience is it takes a good bit longer to dry out. Some of the synthetics dry faster, wick moisture better, are durable and still pretty warm. A good many of the mountaineering/expedition guys go with synthetics for that reason.

From: Nick Muche
25-May-16

Nick Muche's MOBILE embedded Photo
Nick Muche's MOBILE embedded Photo

One base layer. One fleece. Puffy or warm layer and rain gear.

From: Nick Muche
25-May-16
Sleep in a synthetic sleeping bag each night in your clothes and wake up dryer than a popcorn fart.

From: TD
26-May-16
Does goat deke camo count as a layer? heheheheh....

From: Nick Muche
26-May-16
Yep, it's a fleece. Quiet, warm, easy to dry. I knew when I bought it in high school 15 years ago I'd put it to good use.

From: jims
29-May-16
My first word of advice on a backpack goat hunt is to get a good scale and weigh all the items you plan on bringing. The more weight and bulk you can cut the better! I would go minimal rather than duplicating. If you have layers you can eliminate a lot of the extras. Lighter and less bulky items usually add up in price but are well worth it if you can afford it! One of the biggest risks with fewer clothes is getting wet so excellent raingear is a must. It is also important to get clothes that dry quick and are less bulky.

I'm not sure if anyone mentioned it but trekking poles are pretty nice especially on steep slopes when you have a lot of weight on your back.

From: Bou'bound
01-Jul-16

01-Jul-16
I'm with Steve. I take what a wear on an alpine hunt.

I'm with Nick too. Sleep in what I wear and its completely dry the next morning.

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