Mathews Inc.
Moving Target?
Caribou
Contributors to this thread:
Korey Wolfe 25-May-16
Bou'bound 25-May-16
Bou'bound 25-May-16
Bou'bound 25-May-16
Jaquomo 25-May-16
OneShot 25-May-16
Dwitt2n 26-May-16
TD 26-May-16
APauls 26-May-16
KTH 26-May-16
Beendare 26-May-16
TD 26-May-16
Korey Wolfe 27-May-16
ahunter55 27-May-16
caribou77 28-May-16
axle2axle 28-May-16
caribou77 28-May-16
From: Korey Wolfe
25-May-16
I'm excited to be going on my first caribou hunt this fall with JHA. My brother and I will be bowhunting. So I'd like to hear your experience with getting a caribou to stop for the shot. I very rarely take a shot a moving whitetail and typically wait for them to stop or bleat with my mouth to stop them. Same with elk. But is there a sound that will consistently stop a caribou?

Or if you took a moving shot, what was the distance and the result?

From: Bou'bound
25-May-16
you will have a great trip with Richard! top notch operation.

they are tougher to stop in my opinion. they may be further away, they grunt when they walk and they walk in groups so there is a lot of noise going on often (unlike with deer), and even when just walking their heels click and make noise.

A loud grunt will not spook them, but it may not stop them either.

I will admit that I have gut shot a couple due to the moving issue. The good news is even a gut shot caribou will normally be recovered easily. They won't go far, probably have nowhere to hide and won't go out of sight, and they die easily. better too far back than too far forward.

From: Bou'bound
25-May-16

Bou'bound's embedded Photo
Bou'bound's embedded Photo
This is a one that I shot while moving. a bit far back. he laid down in the open and I got him in a couple hours.

From: Bou'bound
25-May-16

Bou'bound's embedded Photo
Bou'bound's embedded Photo
here is another that I hit farther back on the walk. I marked where I hit. he still bedded in the open at the edge of the water and was easily recovered.

From: Jaquomo
25-May-16
+1 bou. I've never been able to stop them. I did shoot one once that was feeding but otherwise they are on the move. I've never gutshot one but have hunted with guys who have and they do go down relatively quickly most of the time. Once we had to find one that had gone quite a way and finish him off.

Before our first trip we made a moving target on a cable. That really helped. We hunted with trad bows so it was "swing and shoot" and we didn't have to organize sights and pins.

The good news is that is generally pretty open and you can watch them after the shot. Seems like they like to lie down in the open, probably instinctively to see predators, rather than in brush or trees.

One other thing to remember: it's far easier to swing and pivot into the side on which you're holding the bow, rather than away from it. Its a back muscle thing. Try it and you'll see.

From: OneShot
25-May-16
Cool pics

From: Dwitt2n
26-May-16
I'd plan on every caribou you see is going to be moving. You'll find some groups bedded, some feeding but for the most part, they'll be heading somewhere. I agree the grunting probably won't do much, but never say never. Same with making like another caribou and slowly walking towards them. Sometimes they'll stop and watch, sometimes they'll think you're the tax man. Grant is spot on about Richard and Amanda's operation - they set the bar and you'll have the hunt of a lifetime. Safe hunts. PM me if you'd like. I'm making my 4th hunt with JHA this September. ...Dave...

From: TD
26-May-16
If you do take a walking shot with a compound I've found it best to pick a place to "set up" ahead of them and let them walk into it. Just like practice, keep the bow stationary. It's real easy to get all excited and "follow" them with the bow, trying to keep the pin on them as you shoot. A compound bow that is moving at the shot is not a good thing. Hold steady at a spot and let them walk into it. Follow through, everything like at the range.

Trad guys are real good at "winging it" on moving targets.... it's what they do. I know a couple who claim that are better if the target is a bit "dynamic", it lets their subconscious take over instead of a conscious aiming process. Peeps and pins are different. Kinda like shooting a shotgun on sporting clays vs shooting a scoped rifle.

We messed around one day with targets rolling em on a small yard cart, shooting moving targets. With compounds the steady bow was what worked best. Glad it wasn't my cart too....

From: APauls
26-May-16
Interesting TD. Since growing up loosing thousands of rounds through scoped rifles at running jackrabbits I got very used to following through with a precise point of aiming, and have found it to be exactly the same with a bow. In fact found that I became a better shotgun shot when pretending the bead was a precise crosshair.

I find it much easier to shoot a moving target by establishing a lead, swinging with the target and having a good proper release. If you keep your bow stationary, you are forced into punching the trigger when you feel the animal is at the right point. (I have done this on walking whitetails when you have an opening in bush) but prefer to avoid that situation. Another distraction is that you have picked an "aiming point" but have to constantly reference back to your animal and where/how it is advancing, and whether or not you have picked the right spot to "aim." For these reasons, I much prefer a swinging lead.

I absolutely love walking shots at 25 yards or less. I've shot geese at further ranges walking from 40-60 yards and they are great practice for bigger game.

We have done a fair amount of practice at moving targets and if you can find a buddy, grab a 5 gallon pail lid and some judo heads, and have one guy roll them through a field while the other guy shoots. You'll be surprised how proficient you become very quickly and will really help your confidence on moving animals. The beauty of a moving animal, is you know how fast it is going. On stationary animals you can wonder if the animal will jump string. I had a longer shot at my caribou this past fall, and even in the wind he jumped string bad.

From: KTH
26-May-16
This is the biggest problem for me with caribou. I never can remember at crunch time, to aim a bit forward. But I'm really good at killing caribou with liver shots.

From: Beendare
26-May-16
I think TD is right from watching many guys shoot the moving targets on the range...they lose form when trying to track the target

Of course this can be practiced...and it doesn't take much to get the hang of it.

From: TD
26-May-16
If your bow hand is moving at the shot it's usually bad. doesn't matter if you're dropping it and peeking at the range or if it's in motion to the side. For a compound anyway, no bow arm movement and steady follow through is important for accuracy. Bows are slow, it takes a great deal more time for an arrow to get off the string than a bullet out a barrel.

But even that wasn't the biggest problem. One of the things we found was if trying to "maintain lead" with a compound, peep and pins the shooter will follow along, get his lead.... and then actually stop at the shot, as the shot itself tends to be a sequence developed... and hit back. Maintained leads IMO don't work as well with "surprise" releases like with a compound (rifle type) Work much better with an unconscious release trad style with fingers (slap the trigger like a shotgun). Many years ago when I shot trap, installed a release trigger on my trap gun and I went from shooting low 90s to high 90s almost overnight. The gun just seemed to go off by itself when everything was perfect. Rifles, there may be some but I've never seen a release trigger on one.

I grew up shooting rifles and shotguns, started hand loading before I had my drivers license. Close in you're OK. But I've killed a ton of stuff long range from a rest and letting them walk into it. If you're prone to punch, you likely will under pressure of maintaining a lead as well. Shooting a shotgun isn't even a punch, it's almost a slap of the trigger. Again, many thousands of rounds at the trap range. Had one in my backyard.

A person can try both styles and use what works for them. When you get used to one and really want to put it to the test try a few broadheads. Not using my cart though... =D

From: Korey Wolfe
27-May-16
So what is the longest moving shot that a hunter should take? I'm efficient out to 60, but on a moving target should that be reduced to 40? 30?

I sure appreciate the comments and help from those of you with bou hunting experience.

Is there any logic in attempting to stop every caribou before the shot and then if they don't stop, just adjust your aiming point? Is there any harm in attempting to stop them with a bou sound? Like a loud grunt/bleat? Or does that increase the risk of them spooking or speeding up?

From: ahunter55
27-May-16

ahunter55's embedded Photo
ahunter55's embedded Photo
When my son & I were in Quebec, like others said, hard to stop but we had several at close range. My son took his two, 1 walking, 1 standing & mine were moving but real close.. We had one hunter come upon about 30 bedded when he topped the hill from the lake & waited over an hour for them to stand, He took 2 within minutes at close range.

From: caribou77
28-May-16
As others have said. Sometimes they stop...sometimes they don't. Heck sometimes they run as soon as they see you, sometimes they walk right up to you! You just never know. I would prepare for the worst. Practice moving shots. Practice long shots in the wind. Then hopefully with all that practice, you will get one to stand 10 yards in front of you! My biggest bull was shot at a brisk walk. I WISELY barely led him at 35 yards. Apparently I should have led him about 2 ft. Luckily caribou are not tough animals. He ran to the other side of me and stood there at about 40 yards allowing me to get another arrow in him.

From: axle2axle
28-May-16

axle2axle's embedded Photo
axle2axle's embedded Photo
Hey Korey,

Do yourself a favor...buy or rent a caribou bowhunting video and watch it on you TV...use the slow motion capability and a piece of masking tape on the screen in the following way. I used Monster Bulls 3 for my setup...pick whatever video you want, just make sure it has lots of walking shots in it to demonstrate where to aim. Let me explain the process.

OK...freeze the frame on the video EXACTLY where the arrow enters the caribou's chest. Make a small pointer arrow out of a small piece of masking tape...and place it on your TV screen precisely where the arrow is striking the caribou.

Now...back up the video using your remote...one frame at a time...and watch as the arrow returns to the shooter's bow at full draw...while the caribou walks backwards in the video to the spot just a moment before the arrow is launched.

This will show you EXACTLY where the archer/bowhunter was aiming at the moment of the shot.

Trust me when I tell you this will blow you away. And yes, it takes one hell of a lead at times...depending on the shot distance and the speed at which the caribou is walking.

Paid big dividends for me in northern Quebec...and I'm so glad I spent the time to figure it out using video as a tool.

Best of luck on your trip.

Kevin

From: caribou77
28-May-16
Great Picture Kevin. Good tip too. I'll have to try that before my return trip this fall.

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