Carbon Express Arrows
Basic Sheep Questions
Wild Sheep
Contributors to this thread:
Vids 26-Aug-16
NvaGvUp 26-Aug-16
Rock 01-Sep-16
NvaGvUp 04-Sep-16
From: Vids
26-Aug-16
I was lucky enough to be awarded a reissued ewe tag this week, but the hunt is on the 11th and I've never sheep hunted before. I wish I had more time to research and learn about them, but you've gotta take opportunities when they come your way I guess.

I have some basic things I need to understand about sheep, and at the risk off sounding like a simpleton, here goes:

1. How spooky are they? Are they accustomed at all to hikers or will they run off even if they sight you at long distances? This is unit S33 (Colorado) close to several 14ers, so there is hiker traffic. I’m wondering if a decent tactic above timberline is to act like I’m just out for a hike if a stalk is difficult.

2. What are their best lines of defense? Eyes? Ears? Nose?

3. When do they transition from summer range to winter range?

4. If you put them to bed at night will they generally still be in the same area the next morning?

5. Is cooking a bighorn any different than deer/elk? (Don’t need to bring to a higher temp like bear or pigs?)

6. Is it advisable to try and approach them from above like with mountain goats? Can they be approached on the same level or from below?

7. At what time of day are they most active? Dusk and dawn? Or will they move during the day quite a bit?

8. How do they utilize different areas? I know they are different from goats in that they will spend time in the timber, but I want to understand if they go to timber to feed, or just ravel through, or what? I believe they like to bed above timberline so they can see predators, correct?

Any help you guys can send my way is appreciated, thanks!

From: NvaGvUp
26-Aug-16
Vids.

How spooky are they? Are they accustomed at all to hikers or will they run off even if they sight you at long distances? This is unit S33 (Colorado) close to several 14ers, so there is hiker traffic. I’m wondering if a decent tactic above timberline is to act like I’m just out for a hike if a stalk is difficult.

They survive primarily by using their eyes. Don't get seen!

That said, if they regularly see hikers, they will be accustomed to that.

Never-the-less, Don't get seen!

3. When do they transition from summer range to winter range?

When weather forces them to go lower. Your dates should not trigger that.

4. If you put them to bed at night will they generally still be in the same area the next morning?

Yes, generally. They are not nearly as nocturnal as deer and elk in my experience.

5. Is cooking a bighorn any different than deer/elk? (Don’t need to bring to a higher temp like bear or pigs?)

No. Game is game. Very little fat, so don't over cook! I use mint sauce or at least mint jelly.

6. Is it advisable to try and approach them from above like with mountain goats? Can they be approached on the same level or from below?

Use the wind, which means after the thermals blow up, stalk from above.

7. At what time of day are they most active? Dusk and dawn? Or will they move during the day quite a bit?

You don't need to get up two hours before dawn. Get up at daybreak then glass, glass, glass!

8. How do they utilize different areas? I know they are different from goats in that they will spend time in the timber, but I want to understand if they go to timber to feed, or just ravel through, or what? I believe they like to bed above timberline so they can see predators, correct?

If they're in the timber, which is infrequently, you're pretty much screwed unless you can spot them in the timber in a place where they are stalkable.

From: Rock
01-Sep-16
1. Depends on hunting and predator pressure but usually not as bad as other animals like Elk.

2. All their senses are very good and my experience here in Colorado is they will tolerate the sight of you more than if they smell you.

3. Transition during the rut and as snows get deep.

4. Generally they will be there but I help a friend one year in an area were we would leave them in the dark and they were no-where to be found the next morning when it got light.

5. Just like Deer or Elk.

6. Best to approach them from above or wherever the best cover is. If there is more than one they will bed down with some facing every direction. If you are on some and it starts to rain good they usually will close there eyes and that gives you a chance to close the distance.

7. first couple of hours and last couple of hours but they can be up feeding anytime of day as they get up often and reposition then re-bed.

8. Some herds spend a lot of time in the timber, other rarely ever. Mostly they use timber and brushy areas to bed in for the shade.

They can be patterned then ambushed as log as they are not getting bumped by other hunters or predator.

From: NvaGvUp
04-Sep-16
I would suggest the ewes will be up higher and in harder to get to terrain than rams. It's their mother instinct to protect their lambs.

When hunting pressure builds up, the rams will move up.

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