Mathews Inc.
Bolen Lewis bound!
Mountain Goat
Contributors to this thread:
bigeasygator 08-Feb-17
LWood 08-Feb-17
Nick Muche 08-Feb-17
midwest 08-Feb-17
Busta'Ribs 08-Feb-17
bigeasygator 08-Feb-17
Mark Watkins 08-Feb-17
huntmaster 08-Feb-17
Chief 419 08-Feb-17
bigeasygator 08-Feb-17
Mark Watkins 08-Feb-17
Bowboy 08-Feb-17
Pyrannah 08-Feb-17
bigeasygator 08-Feb-17
Chief 419 08-Feb-17
Jeff Pals 08-Feb-17
Kurt 08-Feb-17
Jeff Pals 08-Feb-17
Shot 09-Feb-17
Medicinemann 09-Feb-17
Cajunarcher 09-Feb-17
bigeasygator 09-Feb-17
bigeasygator 09-Feb-17
huntmaster 09-Feb-17
bigeasygator 09-Feb-17
bigeasygator 09-Feb-17
g5smoke21 09-Feb-17
huntmaster 09-Feb-17
LWood 09-Feb-17
Zackman 09-Feb-17
bliz6 09-Feb-17
bigeasygator 09-Feb-17
Mark Watkins 09-Feb-17
bliz6 10-Feb-17
iceman 10-Feb-17
Bou'bound 10-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
Ken 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
huntmaster 14-Feb-17
loesshillsarcher 14-Feb-17
bigeasygator 14-Feb-17
NJbowhunter 16-Feb-17
Neubauer 17-Feb-17
Ambush 17-Feb-17
NJbowhunter 17-Feb-17
NJbowhunter 17-Feb-17
Mike Ukrainetz 22-Feb-17
Mike Ukrainetz 22-Feb-17
bigeasygator 26-Jul-17
Ambush 26-Jul-17
bigeasygator 08-Aug-17
Zackman 08-Aug-17
bigeasygator 08-Aug-17
DEMO-Bowhunter 08-Aug-17
bigeasygator 25-Aug-17
Bou'bound 25-Aug-17
Chief 419 25-Aug-17
SteveB 25-Aug-17
wildwilderness 26-Aug-17
Bowboy 26-Aug-17
From: bigeasygator
08-Feb-17
Just sent in my deposit on a hunt with Bolen Lewis this September! I'm pumped!! Other than "get in the best shape of your life!" -- which I've started on -- feed free to add any other advice for hunting with Bolen Lewis or goats in general. I think I've read every other goat thread on here about three times already!

From: LWood
08-Feb-17
I hunted goats with them several years ago. Great guys, awesome hunt. I'd be happy to share info from my hunt. Shoot me a PM.

From: Nick Muche
08-Feb-17
Best of luck man! Hope you arrow a big ol billy!

From: midwest
08-Feb-17
Dream hunt.....good luck!

From: Busta'Ribs
08-Feb-17
Ask Spike for his wife's salmon recepie.

From: bigeasygator
08-Feb-17
Busta' that's the kind of advice I'm talking about! Haha Thank you!

From: Mark Watkins
08-Feb-17
Congrats!!!

Practice the daylights out of:

-severe downhill and uphill angles at all of your comfortable yardages. -do this while on one knee, both knees, on your butt and any other uncomfortable and contorted angles you can dream up. -make sure your 2nd and 3rd axis are dialed in -have the best rain gear possible -boots incredibly well broken in on uneven rugged, hilly ground with your backpack on

Mark

From: huntmaster
08-Feb-17
I'll second everything Mark just posted. I shot my goat laying on my side on an open shale chute at close range and goofed the shot up partly because I didn't practice that way or check my bubble that I recall.

Oh, Good Luck!! Have fun and embrace the grind.

From: Chief 419
08-Feb-17
Good luck Jason! A story with plenty of pictures is required when you get back.

From: bigeasygator
08-Feb-17
Mark,

Thanks for that! Some of that is going to be a serious challenge living in New Orleans! Hitting the stair climber with my boots pretty hard but there isn't a hill for about 100 miles!! I'll have to see how some of the other Louisiana boys (bigpizzaman, cajunarcher) practiced!

Scott,

I'll definitely embrace the grind! Good meeting you at the Sheep Show. You going to P&Y?

Randy,

We still need to grab a beer some time!

From: Mark Watkins
08-Feb-17
High school stadium stairs and hike the embankments of highway overpasses to strengthen the ankles under load.

Shoot off 3-5 story roof tops at super steep angles. Not shots on goats, but my Dall was a 61 degree downhill angle and my Bighorn was a 32 degree uphill angle

You just never know what that "one shot" is going to be!

Good luck!!

Mark

From: Bowboy
08-Feb-17

Bowboy's embedded Photo
Bowboy's embedded Photo
This is the billy I took with Bolen & Lewis in 2011. Get in good shape. You'll have a great hunt with them.

From: Pyrannah
08-Feb-17
the pictures and stories i see on this site really drive me to go on one of these hunts in the future.. but then i see things like this:

"Shoot off 3-5 story roof tops at super steep angles. Not shots on goats, but my Dall was a 61 degree downhill angle and my Bighorn was a 32 degree uphill angle"

and i quickly realize a hunt like this is not for me who is challenged when it comes to heights......

awesome hunt for you, and i hope you post your story when you get back...

congrats and enjoy!

From: bigeasygator
08-Feb-17
Pyrranah, I feel ya!! I've done plenty of mountain hunts and a few in pretty rough country, but to tell the truth some of this scares me!

Any tips for dealing with the extremes of goat hunting? Or how to avoid a situation where I fear for my life??

From: Chief 419
08-Feb-17
Pyrannah - There are plenty of animals that can be hunted without climbing mountains. All of the deer species, pronghorns, bears, moose, muskox, caribou. Pick an animal you want to hunt and put a deposit down. The anticipation and preparation for one of these hunts is all part of the fun.

From: Jeff Pals
08-Feb-17
I hunted with Bolen Lewis the first week of October 2015. You picked the best goat outfit hands down! They have incredible goats and amazing scenery/habitat, capped off with hard core guides that love goat hunting as much, if not more, than the clients. I got to know all the guides on my trip there and I would gladly hunt and camp with them anywhere. I can't wait to go back sometime in the near future. All of the guides and owners bowhunt, so if you are serious about doing it with a bow, they understand and you won't feel pressure to shoot one with the guide's rifle.

You need to train physically and you also need to prepare mentally. The toughest part of this trip, if you prepared properly, might be the mental aspect. This area receives more moisture that just about anywhere. Granted, I experienced the worst of it, but you need to get your mind right for tent time. The moisture is what grows huge goats, but it also makes for some tough days in the tent. I experienced rain, snow, fog, sun, 20 degrees and 60 degrees in less than two weeks.

If you want an adventure, you will get it and so much more. I wish I was going this year too!

I made a 15 minute (amatuer) video of my trip. If you want to get pumped up for your hunt, you can watch it at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrTSlZkQskw&t=34s

PM me with any questions.

-Jeff

From: Kurt
08-Feb-17
They have some good guys for guides. I have run into a few of them around the back country (not in the B&L goat area) and liked all of them. Good luck on the hunt!

From: Jeff Pals
08-Feb-17

Jeff Pals's embedded Photo
Jeff Pals's embedded Photo
Jeff Pals's embedded Photo
My 45 2/8" P&Y billy.
Jeff Pals's embedded Photo
My 45 2/8" P&Y billy.

From: Shot
09-Feb-17
Congrats, I booked with them as well, but for 2019. Best of luck!

From: Medicinemann
09-Feb-17
If you can locate a 12" X 12" piece of nine pound foam, take it with you. It will allow you to shoot a couple practice arrows every day without trashing them (even in really rocky areas), and it doesn't take up a lot of space in/on your backpack.

From: Cajunarcher
09-Feb-17
Positive attitude the whole time you on that mountain will get you a goat! Obviously being in the best shape possible is a given but just remember when it's kicking your ass and you thinking why the hell im doing this that someone would love to be in your shoes that might not be in position to do this hunt like you are ! Have fun Jason that was funniest hunt I've ever done hands down!

PS.. run a 5k everyday from now till your hunt especially in our Louisiana summers and you will be fine lol

From: bigeasygator
09-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Jake,

Adam Foss turned me onto these targets at the Sheep Show. It's the Griz Targets Backpacker Superlight and they're made by Arrowpad Archery Targets. It weighs 1 lb 5oz and even has a nice little rope attached to hang from something to shoot. I haven't used it yet but it's definitely some stout foam. Might be a little more than I wanted to carry, but given how rough goat country can be it's probably worth the piece of mind!

From: bigeasygator
09-Feb-17
Lee, I totally get "Embracing the Suck"!! I always look forward to the physical and mental challenge these kind of hunts pose -- when you feel like you accomplished something even if you don't punch a tag (and when you do, it's even better!). I've been doing an hour on the elliptical at a fairly high resistance and about 30 minutes on the stair climber about four days a week. Once I get to fighting weight I'll do some running too!

From: huntmaster
09-Feb-17
If I had to run a 5k in Louisiana summers to hunt, I'd quit... Can't stand running or heat!!

I like to hike, so I put 65 lbs in my pack and hiked a berm system for an hour in my yard once or twice a week and then did P90x3 videos a couple days a week. I do this prior to all of my hunts and have been physically fine on all of the trips.

Also, I'm slightly afraid of heights, but I found that the slopes were never an issue for me, it was sitting on the edge of a cliff looking down or glassing that made me feel it.

From: bigeasygator
09-Feb-17
Scott, I'm the same way with running. Definitely not my favorite thing. How long ahead of your hunts would you start that program? I'm planning on kinda building a solid base with the elliptical and stair climber over the next few months and then maybe push it up a notch a few months before the September hunt (ie, doing the stair climber with a weighted pack, more interval training, etc).

And I feel the same way about terrain. I've gotten into some pretty steep slopes, but in general I could just keep pushing higher or work lower. I can't think too many times where I've been on a hunt where I really had to watch where I put my foot to ensure I didn't hundreds or thousands of feet! It's the "cliffy" stuff that makes me uncomfortable. I guess the good news is that I have a healthy respect for it and hopefully that'll keep me out of any seriously sketchy situations.

From: bigeasygator
09-Feb-17
Scott, I'm the same way with running. Definitely not my favorite thing. How long ahead of your hunts would you start that program? I'm planning on kinda building a solid base with the elliptical and stair climber over the next few months and then maybe push it up a notch a few months before the September hunt (ie, doing the stair climber with a weighted pack, more interval training, etc).

And I feel the same way about terrain. I've gotten into some pretty steep slopes, but in general I could just keep pushing higher or work lower. I can't think too many times where I've been on a hunt where I really had to watch where I put my foot to ensure I didn't hundreds or thousands of feet! It's the "cliffy" stuff that makes me uncomfortable. I guess the good news is that I have a healthy respect for it and hopefully that'll keep me out of any seriously sketchy situations.

From: g5smoke21
09-Feb-17
I am in the same boat. I am going this sept. with a different outfitter. Have been doing a lot of running, weight lifting and since I am from Wisconsin and don't have much for elevation change i have been putting the treadmill on a 30% incline and walking that with my pack and 45 lb plate and hiking boots for about 2000 vert. feet each week. Since i have booked i went from 190 lbs to now 168 lbs. It has been a struggle but will be worth it! Good luck on your hunt!

From: huntmaster
09-Feb-17
I try to keep my exercise routine minus the pack training going year round, but I hit snags along the way...

So, the intensity and frequency definitely picks up three months out. I usually take the week before I leave off to let my body rest and not risk injury. I also mark the days I work out on a calendar in my hunting room, it helps keep me honest. Heck, I might be able to send you a pic of the calendar...

From: LWood
09-Feb-17
Jason, Sounds like you have done enough hunts to know what is coming. It is very physical, but your mental prep is most important. You have to be prepared for a lot of tent time. I think the hunter before me spent 8 out of 10 days in his tent. Luckily I had better weather.

I am a flatlander as well, and crossfit plus a heavy pack/stairs routine had me physically ready. Crossfit, I think, helped me with the mental part as well. Ask BL for their gear list if you haven't yet. It has everything you will need. After you get your goat, send it to Dennis Razza. He's the best!

Lenny

From: Zackman
09-Feb-17
Jason, best advice I got for a goat hunt:

"Don't fall off the mountain!"

Get is shape, sort out your pack, shoot funny angles and enjoy some of the most beautiful scenery in North America!

You may not enjoy some--or most--of the parts of your hunt, but it is something you will want to do again. Good luck!

From: bliz6
09-Feb-17
Some great information already provided here but I will pile on to Mark's comments on the sight axis. Get them set and live by the level. It is tough in the heat of the moment to focus on the level but in my opinion is the most important thing you can do!

From: bigeasygator
09-Feb-17
I hear ya. I'll be running a MBG Pure Gold and I have a third axis tool to make sure everything is dialed in. I've done a little shooting at elevation/steep angles...enough to know how deceiving things can be anyway! Typically the first thing in my shot routine once I'm at full draw is to check the level and recheck it. In the heat of the moment it can be easy to forget but I'll make sure I drill it into my head when I practice!

From: Mark Watkins
09-Feb-17
Big easy,

Your backpack able target will strap on to the bottom (exterior) of most packs. IMHO, it is one of those "must have" gear pieces and it goes with me everywhere on mountain hunts.

Wake up in the AM and shoot 2-3 arrows each day to make sure your rig is still dialed in and to maintain confidence for your opportunity.

Shoot a few shots into the Griz target at home to make sure it will stop your arrows. (The micro diameters...injexion/VAPS can sometimes penetrate and bugger up the fletching).

Mark

From: bliz6
10-Feb-17
That target also makes a great seat while glassing! Even more so if it is a damp day....

From: iceman
10-Feb-17
Jason, you got this! You've done enough hunts to know about what to expect. Plenty of time before September..just keep doing cardio and you'll be fine.

From: Bou'bound
10-Feb-17
Use trekking poles

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17
I know the single most important factors that I can control for this hunt will be my physical shape and mental toughness, but I know most people don't come on these sites to talk about exercise...so let's talk gear!

I've been going through the Bolen Lewis gear list and cross-referencing it with gear lists I've put together on past backpack/mountain hunts. I thought I'd spend some time sharing what has worked for me, some of the new stuff I'll be trying, and how I pack it all together. Thought this might be a good reference for folks and also an invitation for people to chime in with any feedback or comments.

I plan on breaking this down into a few categories: 1) Gear I'll pack in 2) Clothing I'll pack in 3) Gear I'll wear in. So let's dive in.

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17
This is the gear I will be packing in, and the bag I'll be packing it in. It can be broken down into a few categories (which I'll cover in a little more depth later).

The way I categorize gear breaks it down into: 1) Sleep System 2) Cookware/Utensils 3) Electronics 4) Necessities/Essentials 5) Archery Equipment and 6) Pack Sytem

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Not sure why the picture didn't post, but here is all the gear I'll be packing in. Again, I'll run through what it is in a little more detail when I show how I pack it.

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
This is the clothing I'll be packing in. This will go into a dry bag and into the pack. It includes:

- Two base layer shirts (First Lite Llano Short-Sleeves) - One base layer leggings (First Lite Allegheny) - Three pairs of socks (Darn Toughs) - Three pairs of liner socks (Kenetrek) - One extra mid-layer shirt (deciding to try the Sitka Fanatic Hoody as it is roughly the same weight/material as a Traverse plus the built-in hood/facemask might come in handy). - One insulating layer (Sitka Stratus Vest, which is a little heavier than a Sitka Jet Stream. Lots of people seemed to say a fleece jacket would be good, which is what this is without the sleeves). - One puffy jacket (Sitka Kelvin Lite hoody, for when things get chillier) - One set of rain gear (Kuiu Chugach) - Neck Gaiter (First Lite) - Waterproof gloves (Sitka Stormfront -- just the shell) - Lightweight gloves (Sitka Traverse) - Beanie (Sitka reversible w/ Windstopper)

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Here is the clothing and hear I'll be wearing-in.

- Pants (Kuiu Alpine) - Base Layer Shirt (First Lite Llano LS, though I may bring a Chama instead). - Midweight shirt (Sitka Traverse, which has become my go-to "hunting layer", and can be supplemented by the Stratus Vest. This may get packed during the hike-in) - Socks - Liner Socks - Gaiters (Kuiu Chugach or Sitka Stormfront) - Gloves (Sitka Shooter) - Belt (Kuiu) - FHF Bino Harness - Wind detector (on the Bino Harness) - Binos (Swarovski EL 10x42) - Rangefinder (Leupold RX1000) - Boots (Scarpa Grand Dru GTX) - Lightweight Beanie or Baseball cap (one will be worn, one will be packed) - Trekking poles (Leki Micro Vario Carbon) - Quik Clot and Duct Tape (I'll keep these in a pocket in case of emergency)

The only thing you don't see that will be worn on me will be my cell phone, which will go into the Sea to Summit waterproof phone case.

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Here is how it all goes together, and some more details on some of the other gear. In the main bag of the pack will go items that I won't plan on accessing until we're settled in at camp. This includes my sleep system, extra clothes (which I've covered) in a dry bag, hydration bladder (3L) and a camp chair. The one item you don't see is food, which is provided by the outfitter but would also go in the main bag.

The sleep system in includes the following:

- Sleeping bag (Big Agnes Mystic UL 15 degF, the long version packed in an eVent Compression Sack) - Pillow (I'm testing out a few lightweight versions. I sleep a lot better with one) - Sleeping pad (Big Agnes Q Core SL Long to fit the sleeve on the sleeping bag. This goes in a dry bag with the pillow) - Bivy (TiGoat Raven Omni, given how wet coastal BC can get)

It's not the lightest weight system, but it's not too heavy (everything above weighs about 4.5 lbs). I can't do constricting mummy bags and have found the misery of an extra pound on the pack-in is more than made up for by the comfort the gear provides.

The camp chair is a Helinox and weighs in at one pound. This might be something I decide to sacrifice at the end of the day. It's another one of those items that can go a long way in making the trip more comfortable, but comes at a minor weight penalty.

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Here it is all packed in the bag, leaving a little room for food. There isn't that much room which is why I may use the AMR. The AMR would also give a lot of space if I'm lucky enough to pack out a goat!

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Next I'll pack the back pocket on the Mountain Warrior (or the AMR, which has two back pockets) with items that I don't use that often but that I also don't want to have to dig out of the main bag. This includes:

- My Essentials/Necessities bag which holds 1) Repair gear (duct tape, super glue, zip ties, paracord, allen keys etc) 2) Survival gear (firestarter, waterproof matches, lighter, whistle, signal mirror, space blanket, extra knife, extra headlamp) 3) Toiletries (toothbrush, toothpaste) 4) First-aid (moleskin, bandaids, cold/flu pills, pain pills, allergy meds, immodium). This whole bag weighs less than two pounds and is contained in an OR Backcountry Organizer.

Also going in this pocket is: - A spare release - Foldable bowl (Fozzils) - Flask with some damn good whiskey (for any excuse you can find!) - Cup (Snowpeak Titanium cup) - Solar Charger (Suntastics s5) - Battery Pack and cables (Dark Energy Poiseden, which will go into the Kuiu dry zip bag) - Tarp (Zpacks Cuben Fiber tarp with lightweight pegs)

While most of the stuff in the main bag will be left in camp, this stuff will stay in the pack while I'm hunting.

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Next will come gear that I'm going to want to access fairly easily. First will be the stuff that goes into my Guide Lid on top of the bag. This includes all of my rain gear (jacket, pants, gloves, and pack cover), a lightweight glassing pad (from Kuiu), and, most importantly, toilet paper (in a ziploc with a dozen or more Wet Wipes)!

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Then will come the rest of the accessories that will fill out my belt pockets. Like the last category, this is stuff that I plan on either accessing more frequently or stuff that I don't want to dig for when I need it. This includes:

- Nalgene bottle - Utensils - Sunglasses (in a case) - Satellite phone with an extra battery (In a dry bag) - Satellite messenger (Delorme InReach) - Camera (Sony RX100) with extra batteries and small tripod - Headlamp (Black Diamond Storm) - Knife (Benchmade North Fork Folder) - Chapstick - Lighter (wrapped with Leukotape) - Multitool (Leatherman Squirt) - Bug Net (Outdoor Research) - Extra Batteries (AA for Delorme, AAA for headlamp, CR2 for rangefinder)

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
There are a few accessory pockets on the right side of my bag and belt that will hold the Nalgene, Sat phone, Camera (and accessories).

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
The right side of my belt also has a pocket for my knife and a small belt pocket (from Mystery Ranch) that holds the headlamp, multitool, chapstick, earplugs, and batteries.

I don't have a picture for it but on the left side of my belt will be a medium Kifaru belt pocket that will hold the inReach and the bug netting) and attached to the bag is a large belt pocket that I'll put the sunglasses and the utensils. I will also lash some extra arrows to the left side of the pack.

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
That is it for all the gear in the pack. Next I will strap the bow to the pack using a compression strap and the attached Kifaru Grab-it. Lastly, I will lash the target to the outside of the pack along with the crocs (which I will attach using a carabiner) .

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
This whole pack weighs 41 lbs at this point WITH the bow attached but WITHOUT food or water (we won't need to pack much water in as there is plenty available where we'll set camp). This doesn't include the weight of anything I'll be wearing in as well.

There are a few things which I may cutout if I really want to reduce weight:

- Helinox Chair (1 lb) - Tarp (7 oz) - Delorme (10 oz) -- the outfitter will have one on him for emergencies and I'll have a sat phone - A pair of socks (3 oz) - Pillow (8 oz) -- may just stuff clothes in a dry bag, though I much prefer some kind of actual pillow, preferably a compressible one - Whiskey and flask (12 oz) -- chances are I'm taking this! - Sitka Status vest (1 lb)

That is 4.5 lbs of stuff right there. I'm hesitant to get rid of some of the clothing given how wet it is, and as I mentioned before some of those items will make 8 days in the backcountry a lot more comfortable. That's the trade-off though.

I'm curious to hear what has worked for other folks. I've done a lot of research on previous threads and much of that has inspired this list, along with my own experience. Hope some of you might find this useful one day, and like I said, looking forward to any feedback!

From: Ken
14-Feb-17
You should consider an arrow tube for carrying your arrows. When I went on a Mountain Goat hunt I kept my arrows in a tube except when hunting and had a Velcro strap that added extra security for the arrows in the quiver. I didn't have any problems but did this because I have heard multiple stories of guys losing most of their arrows out of their quiver due to all of the scrubby brush you will encounter in Mountain Goat country.

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17
Ken,

I've got an arrow tube and I'll certainly be traveling with it to base camp. I'm torn as to whether to pack it in as it weighs a pound. I'm hoping to get away with just lashing the extra arrows on the pack. I was planning on running a piece of duct tape around the arrows to keep them together. I also planned up running a piece of duct tape around the arrows in the quiver as well to secure them to each other and keep a single arrow from getting ripped out. Anybody have any experience doing this?

From: huntmaster
14-Feb-17
Jason, I took 6 extra arrows and broadheads with me, I duct tapped three together without points and put them in my pack and another three in the guides pack. Just in case something happened, they all didn't break. Then I put the extra broadheads in a secured container and kept them in my pack broken down.

Duct taping your arrows into the quiver is a good idea as you are climbing up into the alpine, I lost one arrow out of my quiver on the decent to change mountains. The next trip up, we duct tapped them in and they held better. I have a Tight Spot and the one I seem to lose the most is the one that unloads toward the back of the bow, not sure if I've ever lost any of the others.

14-Feb-17
I would be a much better hunter if I was as prepared as you are. Looks great and am envious. maybe an extra boot lace is the only thing I can offer. haha

From: bigeasygator
14-Feb-17
I'll say this, most of my failings as a bowhunter aren't related to gear, that's for sure haha It's never too early to start, and while laying gear out seven months ahead is a bit overboard I certainly encourage people to get it all together and make sure it all works together. Besides, I'm always looking for equipment that will perform better (more durable, multi-purpose, lighter weight, etc) and if somebody makes any suggestions now there's a good chance I can find one on sale or get a deal on it over the next few months haha

From: NJbowhunter
16-Feb-17
I hunted with them in 2015 and took a goat on the 6th day. Enjoy it , it is beautiful up there ( when the fog clears ) be patient and you will love it. I am a flat lander like you so any time in the mountains is special to me ! best of luck !

From: Neubauer
17-Feb-17
I hunted goat 2 years ago very close to Bolens area at the end of August and we were dealt some seriously cold weather and snowstorms. I would strongly recommend an extra puffy jacket with hood to go over everything. I slept in a 15 degree quality bag and wished I had something a lot warmer. Your going to have an awesome hunt! Wish I was going back. Break in those new looking boots! :)

From: Ambush
17-Feb-17
Looks like you have a good grip on your gear preparation. Good gear, good conditioning and a great attitude puts you in the best possible position to make it a fantastic adventure.

Just a couple of suggestions from my experience hunting the north's mountains. There is no choice but to pack for both weather extremes; from way too hot to very cold and wet. You can suffer through heat, but wet\cold can end that part of your hunt. Your rain gear must be readily available and MUST be easy on and off. If not, you may put off putting it on until it's too late. Stay dry!

Keep your feet dry. Damp or wet feet are soft feet. Soft feet get damaged easier. Take your boots and socks off if you are sitting for extended glassing sessions. Wash and dry your feet everyday.

If possible, keep your arrows below the bow cam. If you are using trekking poles [you should] put them on your pack as an arrow guard, with the end a little higher than your shafts. Do that while clawing your way through the tangle where you can't use the poles anyway. I also use a spare bootlace tied around the shafts and quiver to keep shafts in place. Then even if they pop out of the holder the heads will still be in the hood and you'll likely hear the shafts clicking each other if they are loose. You can still easily get an arrow out with the bootlace, not so much with duct tape.

Be honest with yourself and your guide about your capabilities and comfort level. Those guys are like goats themselves and are comfortable in that terrain. You don't want to use a sat. phone to call in a chopper rescue. You probably already know that you can climb up what you can't climb down.

My "comfort pack" consists of antibacterial wipe packets, baby wipes in a zip-loc and the half-sheet paper towels in another zip-loc. All this in one bigger zip-loc. Toilet paper does not stand up well when damp or to wet fingers. Not the "breakthrough" you're looking for on a hunt. Anti bacterial wipes are too harsh for anything but your hands.

When you're slogging up a super steep hill, scratched up by alder and Devil's Club, wet snow in your face and worn down from lack of sleep, just remember: those are the very conditions that grow big goats. Lots of green feed, a long growing season and very few hunters with the grit to kill them. There could easily be the next P&Y world record billy lying just over that next ridge!!

Hunt hard and have the adventure of a lifetime!

From: NJbowhunter
17-Feb-17
I am sorry I didn't read everything here but I suggest taking two bows and leave one at the tent at the base of the mountain.

From: NJbowhunter
17-Feb-17
By the way don't be insulted if your guide undoes your pack before you fly out and gets rid of things you don't need . But it's your hunt and you carry it, do want you want.

22-Feb-17
Very thorough! Great job. What sort of bow repair kit do you have? From near disastrous experience I now carry at a minimum D loop material and a spare shot in string with extra peep sight, of course need a portable bow press. May seem excessive to some but if my string breaks my hunt is over, I'm not killing the goat with the guide's rifle. A 2nd bow is a good idea but in most cases you are not going to hike all the way back down the mountain to get it, it's just too far.

22-Feb-17
curious too on what the sleep, tent accidental overnight arrangements are? You seem to have a bivy, tarp and an emergency space blanket but no tent mention?

From: bigeasygator
26-Jul-17
Mike,

My bow repair kit is pretty minimal. I'd call it more of a bow maintenance kit than a bow repair kit. I have a portable bow press but don't foresee packing it in. My plan is to have a back-up bow in base camp. I also planning on trying to take every precaution possible to prevent any damage to the bow, including having the strings and sight covered up. Hopefully that'll be enough (knock on wood!).

With regards to sleep accommodations, the outfitter provides the tent. Pretty sure the guide and I will be sharing a Kuiu Storm Star tent for us to share. The tarp and space blanket will stay in the pack for any emergency/accidental overnight stays.

About a month and a half out from heading up to Terrace!

From: Ambush
26-Jul-17
Goats will sometimes mean a bit of rock climbing.

Just remember: you can go up what you went down, but you can't always go down what you went up.

Yes, I have been "stuck" a couple of times.

Big Billy country you're heading into!! I personally believe that goat would be the most likely animal to be able to break the P&Y world record. You just have to kill that 55" with a bow instead of a rifle.

From: bigeasygator
08-Aug-17
So is anyone else basically a complete waste of space right now and can only seem to think about their upcoming hunt? I think I've reread every mountain goat thread from the past year at least three times lately. I've been ramping up the physical training (without overdoing it!) for the final push over the next few weeks before I head to Terrace on September 7th. I've must've googled "mountain goat hunt" and "mountain goat hunting" and "Bolen Lewis" a dozen times over the last few weeks. I've gone through my gear about at least three times over the last few weeks as well. So who else has a one-track mind right now with regards to their upcoming hunts, be it goat or other??

From: Zackman
08-Aug-17
Good luck Jason! Look forward to hearing about your hunt

From: bigeasygator
08-Aug-17
Thanks Zack! Hoping to put my hands on some white fur just like a few other bowsiters have this year ;-)

08-Aug-17
Shoot straight buddy!

From: bigeasygator
25-Aug-17

bigeasygator's embedded Photo
bigeasygator's embedded Photo
Coming down to go time! Training has been ok and I'm to the point where it's about time to wind down and save it up for the hunt. The trip to Hawaii with my wife should be the perfect precursor to the hunt. Trying to do all I can to practice some of the crazy shots I might find myself offered. It's a little tough here in the flattest state in the country but you learn to adapt!

From: Bou'bound
25-Aug-17
you'll be ready and enjoy the trip of a lifetime, goat or no

From: Chief 419
25-Aug-17
Good luck Jason! Take plenty of pictures and post up a report.

From: SteveB
25-Aug-17
Good luck Jason!

26-Aug-17
You are using that scissor lift wrong!!

You need to put a board over a corner and Stand ON The BOARD! Then shoot straight down at the target.

This will give you real practice standing on a cliff edge, heights, and the real chance of falling!

From: Bowboy
26-Aug-17
Good luck

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