Carbon Express Arrows
Official Turkey Research
Turkey
Contributors to this thread:
bowcrazyJRHCO 04-Apr-17
Rut Nut 04-Apr-17
bowcrazyJRHCO 04-Apr-17
Brotsky 04-Apr-17
04-Apr-17
I pulled the below from the Nebraska Game and Parks newsletter - this research may confirm or contradict your in-the-field observations. Definitely a few nuggets you can gain from it - any comments???

Here are some interesting findings relating to the gobbling activity of male wild turkeys from research done by Dave Godwin, turkey project leader for Mississippi Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks, and Derek Colbert, graduate student at the University of Georgia.

--The higher number of turkeys, particularly 2-year-olds, the higher gobble count throughout the spring season.

--Gobbling activity was highest when winds were about 3 mph, and reminded high when wind speeds increased to 6 mph. Activity tapered off after that and almost no gobbles were recorded when winds exceeded 12 mph. Wind direction was not a factor.

--The average daily temperature played a role in gobbling activity, as birds sounded off the most when the average daily temperature was between 60 and 69 degrees. As the temperature increased, gobbling decreased.

--The average barometric pressure affected gobbling activity, as well. Lower pressure, often associated with rain, meant less gobbling. Birds were most active at 29.9 to 30.2 inches, and when the pressure fell below 29.7 inches, gobbling activity decreased dramatically.

--There is no link between gobbling activity and hunting pressure. Gobbling activity varies widely during a spring season, but hunted birds are still vocal.

--Habitat did cause variations in gobbling activity. A considerably large percent of gobbles were noted near water compared to other areas of the research site, but that doesn’t mean toms near water gobble more. More likely, it means gobblers prefer to roost near water.

--Wildlife biologists have long assumed there were two peak gobbling periods: one during flock break-up and a second during the start of nesting. However, that’s what the research data necessarily indicated. Several studies indicate just one peak, and it doesn’t always coincide with the peak of nest initiation, nor was it readily identifiable.

--Population dynamics and weather patterns can shift the peak gobbling activity by a week or more in the springtime.

--Do wild turkeys gobble only in the spring? No, we associate gobbling with springtime and attempts made by gobblers to attract hens. Turkeys can and do gobble throughout the year. Toms gobble during the fall, though less frequently than in the spring. Occasionally, turkeys gobble in response to loud and sudden noises such as a train whistle. This can happen at any time.

From: Rut Nut
04-Apr-17
I assume the research was done in Mississippi?

I find it odd that "THERE IS NO LINK BETWEEN GOBBLING ACTIVITY AND HUNTING PRESSURE". Being from the Northeast, I can tell you that is NOT my experience! (up here ;-)

04-Apr-17
Yes, I am guessing the research is from Mississippi. I found the temperature interesting. tells me its better to hunt earlier in the year, rather than in May.

From: Brotsky
04-Apr-17
"--Gobbling activity was highest when winds were about 3 mph, and reminded high when wind speeds increased to 6 mph. Activity tapered off after that and almost no gobbles were recorded when winds exceeded 12 mph. Wind direction was not a factor."

If this were 100% true a turkey may go most of its natural life here in the Dakotas without gobbling:)

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