Moultrie Products
Darkening A Blind
Turkey
Contributors to this thread:
Twanger 01-May-17
Nomad @ work 01-May-17
Ermine 01-May-17
MNRazorhead 01-May-17
djb 01-May-17
Brotsky 01-May-17
Twanger 01-May-17
trkyslr 01-May-17
Brotsky 01-May-17
Rock 01-May-17
Teeton 01-May-17
Twanger 02-May-17
GVS 02-May-17
Tonybear61 02-May-17
Paul@thefort 03-May-17
Twanger 04-May-17
krieger 05-May-17
jims 05-May-17
From: Twanger
01-May-17
I set up and hunted a blind this weekend. Although the material seemed to be dark I realized that the fabric let too much light pass through and the turkeys can see me in the blind. My first reaction is to get a can of black spray paint and paint the inside of the blind. Has anyone done this? If so, how did it work for you? Does anyone have a better method?

From: Nomad @ work
01-May-17
Go to a craft store like Michaels & buy some cans of black fabric spray paint. I also use black tape to tape over parts of the seams that leaked too much light.

From: Ermine
01-May-17
Are you wearing black in the blind too?

From: MNRazorhead
01-May-17
I use a cheaper method. Just get several large black lawn bags, at least 39 gallon or larger. Hang them behind you from your shooting window by tucking them in behind the rods. It will appreciably darken the interior of your blind and gives you a totally black background to anything looking into the blind window. I've tried the black spray, but it doesn't do anything for the light being let in through zippers and window shades that don't fully cover the window, or any other pinpoints of light coming through the fabric seams, etc. Good Luck!

From: djb
01-May-17
I used black Rust-Oleum fabric and vinyl spray paint.

From: Brotsky
01-May-17
Hobby Lobby, matte black fabric spray paint!

From: Twanger
01-May-17
Thanks guys. I will get some fabric paint. Do I need more than one can? I may take some black plastic bags so I can hunt it first and then spray it before I leave.

I have been wearing a black shirt, hat and gloves but I have not been blackening my face. My other blinds have a blackened interior and I have had turkeys at 3-6' w/o problem. With this blind I had a turkey spook so I looked in from 6 yards and I could see the white lettering on my bow in a ground stake well back in the blind. I was shocked. Thanks again.

From: trkyslr
01-May-17
Cover your face as well with black face paint or a black mask if you have practiced shooting while wearing one. It helps and makes a difference.

From: Brotsky
01-May-17
Try to sit as far back in the blind away from the opening as you can as well. If you combine that with wearing black you can get away with murder!

From: Rock
01-May-17
6 cans min to do a Blind, you might want to try wearing camo that matches of is close to the camo of your Blind that is what I do and I have only ever been busted once in 31 years.

From: Teeton
01-May-17
Are all ur windows behind you and the far side ones closed ? If not,, they will see you through the back and back side windows.

From: Twanger
02-May-17
Thanks for the responses. I do sit back in the blind and I make sure that nothing is open behind me. Years ago I worked a Tom that was with 2 hens about 350 yards away in a field. I got the Tom strutting and performing and the 2 hens walked off while he was preoccupied. Once the Tom realized that the hens were gone, he came to me. I had the corner windows open on both side of the corner so I could see the field. As the Tom worked his way up the field edge and got close I decided to pick up my bow before I could see him again. He saw the movement of my broadhead through the corner off the blind and that was it. I was shooting through mesh at that time so the windows still were a little dark. It was a great hunt and taught me a lesson never to have any openings behind movement. Thanks again. I appreciate the help.

From: GVS
02-May-17
open the least amount of windows and use the black bags to make the windows as small as is practicle

From: Tonybear61
02-May-17
Contractors bags or tarp, either one in black. Be very fussy about wearing black from the waist up while in the blind.

From: Paul@thefort
03-May-17

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
while the sun was shining, I closed up all of the possible area the sun might come in.
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
while the sun was shining, I closed up all of the possible area the sun might come in.
Not sure why you are being busted if you are in a blind and the tom is concentrating on the decoys. Maybe you are making the wrong move at the wrong time and not waiting for the tom to commit to the decoys before you make your move.

My older T2 double bull blind did not have a black interior so I use fabric paint BUT be careful because if you apply too much it will bleed through destroying the original camo so apply light coats. Picture is that T2 blind I killed this tom in Neb, just the other day at 15 yards. My other blind has the dark interior but I make sure I make the 180 degree window as small as I can to create a good shooting port by using the camo mesh. I never had to shoot through the mesh. When I draw in both blind, I do it off to the side and then move into the shooting port when the tom gives me the best opportunity.

Another suggestion, set up the bind facing north if possible so the sun shine does not come into the blind. .

From: Twanger
04-May-17
Paul, thanks for the help. I am armed with plastic bags and black duct tap for the weekend. I will paint the blind after season closes. I got busted once in one of three blinds. I had no problems moving and drawing on birds in the blinds with black coatings.

From: krieger
05-May-17
Yes, all blinds are not created equal, I've discovered that myself. Even my original DB lets too much light in the top, material not thick enough, I plan on getting some black fabric paint and working on it. The black garbage bag, tarp is a great idea too.

I got a Xenek blind this year, they use a 3 ply material on it. You can put a flashlight on the top at night outside and see NO light passing through. Makes a big difference.

From: jims
05-May-17
It's sometimes tough to guess which direction turkeys will come from but you may try setting up the decoys to the side of the blind so the blind isn't directly between you and the turkeys when they make their way to the decoys. They may be less prone to see movement when you prepare for your shot.

When I set up antelope blinds I usually have someone sit in the blind and move around. I add brush or change things inside the blind until I can't see movement at all times of the day. I have several home-made blinds that I lined with black woven weed barrier material on the top and sides that light can't penetrate.

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