Slick Trick Broadheads
Blind at waterholes how soon
Pronghorn
Contributors to this thread:
KSBOW 18-May-17
Paul@thefort 18-May-17
Deertick 18-May-17
KSBOW 18-May-17
hoytshooter1 18-May-17
jims 18-May-17
Buffalo1 18-May-17
Glunt@work 18-May-17
t-roy 18-May-17
jims 18-May-17
BULELK1 19-May-17
Ziek 19-May-17
Sage Buffalo 19-May-17
uteangler 19-May-17
Rock 19-May-17
cnelk 19-May-17
jims 19-May-17
cnelk 19-May-17
Cazador 19-May-17
Cazador 19-May-17
midwest 19-May-17
cnelk 19-May-17
mountainman 19-May-17
Cazador 19-May-17
Stoneman 19-May-17
t-roy 19-May-17
ahunter55 19-May-17
Stoneman 19-May-17
jims 19-May-17
drycreek 19-May-17
From: KSBOW
18-May-17
Going on private land hunt this fall, property has several water holes want to go out to scout and set cameras prior to hunt, but based on cattle don't want to leave blinds out for month or more. Is there anything that we can put at the waterholes prior to getting there to hunt that will prepare them for blinds being put up?

From: Paul@thefort
18-May-17
Try 4-5 steel fence posts set up in a square and rapped all around in burlap to make a mock blind, and then surrounded the blind with a square of wire to prevent the cattle from knocking the mock blind down. When you get there, replace the mock blind with your blind.

How soon? a week or two should be ok from my experience

From: Deertick
18-May-17
On private land ... I seem to do well putting the blind up that day. Usually, I have animals come in within an hour, and usually they watch me set it up (I'm a late sleeper in August). The thing that I've noticed is that what drives them away is not the blind itself (i.e. I don't think it's a matter of them "getting used to it") but the location of the blind. They want to be at least 25-30 yards from it at first. Once they come in, they will often come closer, but they want to get their first drink -- and a good look at the blind -- at the spot furthest from the blind. Set up 30 yards away from the furthest point of water and you should be fine.

From: KSBOW
18-May-17
Going on private land hunt this fall, property has several water holes want to go out to scout and set cameras prior to hunt, but based on cattle don't want to leave blinds out for month or more. Is there anything that we can put at the waterholes prior to getting there to hunt that will prepare them for blinds being put up?

From: hoytshooter1
18-May-17
Exactly what Paul said... I've been doing this for years

From: jims
18-May-17
Blinds set up a day or 2 may work for does and small bucks but it may not work for smart, older bucks. If it's the only water source available they may water fairly quick but if there is other water...smart old bucks often wander to water elsewhere. I try to set up my mock or fixed-heavy duty blinds as soon as I find out I draw tags so smart ole bucks don't hesitate to water. If you wait, you may regret it! As Paul mentioned it may be necessary to place barbed or woven wire around the mock blind/blind so it doesn't get tore up by cattle.

From: Buffalo1
18-May-17
Great tip Paul. Tks for sharing.

From: Glunt@work
18-May-17
When I outfitted for antelope, we would put the blinds out a few weeks early and build a 2 strand barbed wire fence with 4 T posts around them. We also shot them from Double Bulls that were put up the day of the hunt, but also have seen bucks wary of them. Cattle love scratching on new stuff, especially in antelope country where there usually isn't much to scratch on.

From: t-roy
18-May-17
Has anyone ever tried setting up a battery or solar powered electric fencer around their blind to keep cattle/horses at bay? I have a small battery powered fencer that I used on our moose hunt to hopefully keep the bears out of camp. It has plenty of snap.

From: jims
18-May-17
I would think hotwire fence would work. It may be a little quicker and easier to set up compared to pounding t-posts and attaching strands of wire?

From: BULELK1
19-May-17
Thanks for sharing that idea Paul

t-roy has another dang good option.

Good luck, Robb

From: Ziek
19-May-17
Like Paul and others, I prefer to set up something (either blind or something that represents a blind) at least a couple of weeks early and surround it with two strands of barbed wire. Some critters may ignore a blind right away. But you'll never know if some are avoiding it.

From: Sage Buffalo
19-May-17
Earlier the better. It's that plain and simple.

Above is some good advice for temp blinds.

Don't let anyone fool you. You can setup the same days as you hunt but older bucks usually shy away especially if they know they have options. If it's the only water around for several miles it might not matter but it's still iffy.

It sounds like you can setup early. Do it.

From: uteangler
19-May-17
We have cattle on our place. I almost always put blinds up, for clients and myself, the day before or sometimes 2 days before. It's very rare that a buck won't eventually come to drink at "his" waterhole. They sometimes are a little nervous about the new object, but basically want to go investigate it closer. The next time they go to that hole, they barely give the object a 2nd look. That's been my experience anyways.

From: Rock
19-May-17
I purchased a Bear Fence from Cabela's just for this purpose and to keep cattle or horses away from my truck while I am hunting.

From: cnelk
19-May-17
I'll draw 3 Wyoming pronghorn tags this year and I'll be hunting on private land with Deertick.

I'll be setting up my blind the same day I hunt and I'll let you know the result.

Btw. If there are multiple water holes, cattle may or may not use the water hole you select to hunt. Just like the pronghorn may or may not

From: jims
19-May-17
Another word of advice. If it's impossible to set up the waterhole blind well in advance of the season "mature" bucks will likely acclimate quicker to the blind if it blends in with it's surroundings and doesn't stand out like a sore thumb. Some guys go to the extend of digging a pit so the blind isn't so sky-lined and obvious. It's also possible to blend the blind in with brush, tall grass, tree, hill, building structure, or what ever cuts the outline of the blind.

I've watched bucks lay down on a hill overlooking blinds/waterholes...waiting and watching does and small bucks water for hours. If a buck notices does aren't nervous there is a pretty good chance they may come in to water.

If antelope haven't acclimated to the blind keep in mind when you set up the blind that the antelope will likely water on the opposite side of the water source so they can watch the blind while they water.

From: cnelk
19-May-17
A good way to deter antelope from using the far side of the water hole is to place a couple duck decoys on that side.

For whatever reason the antelope will avoid the 'ducks'

From: Cazador
19-May-17
Jims and Sage know what they're talking about, I'd pay attention to their comments.

If you like sitting a blind, dying from heat and boredom, and finally seeing that big buck pop up only to see your blind and shy away, have at those same day setups. I have better things to do with my time. Only time I'd do it is if there is a ton of farm junk around the pond, that you can put the blind next to.

If you can access the pond with your truck, T-posts and pallets for a temp blind work well.

From: Cazador
19-May-17

From: midwest
19-May-17
cnelk....that's interesting about the ducks.

From: cnelk
19-May-17
Nick, yeah... and it works.

I for one, [and Im sure many others] dont have the luxury to place blinds prior to my time to hunt. So I do what I have to do.

Glad to see the cynicism is still alive and well by the same people too

From: mountainman
19-May-17
cnelk, I may try that duck thing this august. Sounds like a good, low impact trick.

From: Cazador
19-May-17
You have years of experience from guys who have put hundreds of hours in a blind and know what works. Then they offer solid perspective to shorten the learning curve and up the odds so the original poster has a solid chance at success. Far from being "cynical".

By the way, if you anchor a raft in the middle of the pond, you can normally shoot the whole pond along with any ducks that may come into your decoys.

From: Stoneman
19-May-17
I set up around 2 weeks prior to my hunt (if I can). I use pallets and barb wire if cows are in the area. They will still rub and get nosy but your pallets stay in place and do the job. Night before I drop the pallets and set up the blind.

From: t-roy
19-May-17

t-roy's embedded Photo
t-roy's embedded Photo
This is the fencer unit that I used for the bear proof fence. I think it was around $70. It takes 2 D cell batteries. I would think using this, some polywire and a few posts, you could put up the fence in no time.

From: ahunter55
19-May-17

ahunter55's embedded Photo
ahunter55's embedded Photo
3 trips me & friends put up same day, public land no problems. Cattle, put the 4 posts & wire if possible cause they WILL demolish it other wise.

From: Stoneman
19-May-17

Stoneman's embedded Photo
Stoneman's embedded Photo
blind set up

From: jims
19-May-17
Another nice thing about a solid constructed mock blinds and t-posts is that the wind tends to blow 15 to 20 mph on a calm day in Wyo and elsewhere! If left standing, a mock blind can protect portable blinds from ending up in Nebraska or Kansas....or wrapped around the barb-wire you use to keep the cows out! I usually cut out shooting windows in mock blinds where desired. Antelope are often on high alert while watering and often spook from the sound and motion of flapping material. Be sure to fasten material tightly.

It often pays to think outside the box and be willing to make changes and adjustments depending upon the reaction of critters. As mentioned earlier...a lot comes from actual experience! Stoneman's pallet idea really works! Last year we ran out of mock blinds so I went to town and found some pallets that worked out great in a pinch. Pallets take up a lot of room in a truck bed. I plan on using some new and improved mock blinds this coming season that are portable, quick and easy to erect/take down, and can withstand the elements.

Another blind no one has mentioned is mirror blinds. I've used them a number of times with great success for turkeys and imagine they would work well for spooky antelope. The only problem I've had with mirror blinds is wind!

A couple other reminders....Some states or agencies require a name, phone number, etc placed on blind. Check the regs! I'm often in a rush to get meat and capes in the freezer. Make sure to remove pallets, t-posts, material and fill in any pits once done for the season or landowners/blm may get a bit upset!

From: drycreek
19-May-17
I've hunted out of same-day blinds a lot. Some goats dodge them, some don't. But if you can, the mock blind works well. Only got to try it two seasons, but it worked well both times.

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