Carbon Express Arrows
Frank's 2017 Habitat Work
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
drycreek 28-May-17
drycreek 28-May-17
t-roy 28-May-17
drycreek 29-May-17
willliamtell 01-Jun-17
Alexis Desjardins 02-Jun-17
Mark Watkins 03-Jun-17
Paul@thefort 04-Jun-17
drycreek 01-Jul-17
MDW 02-Jul-17
t-roy 02-Jul-17
drycreek 02-Jul-17
Stickthrower 10-Jul-17
drycreek 12-Aug-17
spike78 19-Aug-17
drycreek 27-Aug-17
Bowhntn 10-Sep-17
Bowhntn 10-Sep-17
drycreek 10-Sep-17
drycreek 23-Sep-17
27-May-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Shed found today on the edge of the clover/cereal grain plot planted last fall.
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Shed found today on the edge of the clover/cereal grain plot planted last fall.
Thought I would share some of my experiences for this year. We Habitat guys are opinionated, so please feel free to add to the discussion. Results vary, and so what I have had success with might not work elsewhere.

I have no formal training in habitat, conservation etc. I am a prolific reader and experimenter. My first food plot was in 1995-96, but I consider myself at the beginning of a long learning curve.

My farm is only 120 acres, split about evenly between mature timber and tillable. It has a 3 acre 16' deep pond. It lays north to south 3/4 mile long and 1/4 mile wide. It is upland, clayish soil with a tendency to dry out. The timber is on the outside all the way around, the tillable is in native grasses with a 7 acre plus continuos food plot that winds through almost the entire length. Fertilized, limed with both annuals and perennials. It is designed to create movement through the property.

27-May-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
I keep bare ground between the woods and NG that I burn each year. I spray this with Gly and disc mid summer.

I remember discussing a couple of times the effect Gly has on clover and I stated it does not kill it. Here is a picture of the perimeter plot sprayed 2 weeks ago with a 2% ratio of Gly to water. It is generic 41% Gly with surfactant. Notice the clover not harmed. It. Rained 48 hours after application. In clover plots I reduce this Gly/water ratio to 1.5%. I think the chances of creating Gly resistant weeds with small scale habitat work is minimal.

27-May-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
The property was loaded with deer and turkey tracks today. While opening the gate a gobbler sounded off. Saw a hen turkey and her nest had to be close by as she did not run as I moved a little closer.

Better picture of the small shed.

27-May-17
Will try and post more tomorrow. Thanks.

28-May-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
This is the southern 2 acres of the plot. It is 'Z' shaped and planted with a mix of ladino/medium red clover last Fall. Rye and wheat we're used as cover crops. More ladino was frost seeded in late February.

I will mow this after the grains fully mature. With proper moisture 15-20% of the grains will germinate this fall keeping the plot more attractive over a longer period of time.

28-May-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
This is the 4 plus acres portion of the plot. It is planted with RR Soybeans as of two weeks ago. Did not rain for a week so germination is just getting underway.

I do not kill all the weeds as I think they make the plot more attractive to wildlife.

Finding the balance between yields for winter food and number of weeds is a challenge. When the beans begin to yellow I will broadcast rye grain in for more food, and soil stabilization and nutrient building. Since the soil was chiseled before planting it is normally still soft enough to germinate significant grain this way.

28-May-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
The above plot is centrally located on the property with the clover connecting on the southern edge. Bleeding off the central plot is a 250 yard by 40' winding plot that has a dual purpose of channeling deer to the bigger plot and as a burn barrier allowing for the NG to be burned on a three year rotation. I chiseled this today.

28-May-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Here is what the chisel looks like. Probably my favorite implement.

From: drycreek
28-May-17
That's a nice looking New Holland tractor Frank. Tell me about it. I'm interested in your food plots, the diversity of crops, and why. Thanks.

28-May-17
drycreek, Thanks! That is a 2016 Power Star T4.75, 4WD. It is more than is needed but the smallest in NH that I could get an air-ride seat with.

My farm was cash rented for 40 years, basically abused. So, I do intense crop rotations to build nutrients and bio-mass as well as attract wildlife. I try and always have a year round food supply, hence the annuals and perennials. I am in agriculture country so I try and have more winter food such as cereal grains, brassicas including radishes and winter bulbs as well as winter peas. There is abundant other food nearby throughout the summer.

The edges have all been feathered, and I practice TSI eliminating sub-standard trees such as locust and hedge to release my mast bearing trees and encourage greater productivity.

The narrow plot I chiseled today will have the brassicas, radishes etc. The chisel was a 7 shank, but with only 75hp I removed two chisels which allows me to really get deep. It is from Buckeye equipment, and they may still customize if needed. I have owned it for 10 years at least and it is my go to tool when I need to turn hard, compacted soil. This happens easily with the clay I have.

FWIW, Robin and I have owned the farm for 10 years. Per soil tests we are making measurable progress. The plots had 14 tons of lime spread this past winter, and my ph is above 6.5.

Hope that answers your questions but feel free to ask additional ones. Again, I recognize what works for me may not work for everyone. A lot of what I do is from reading and talking to a guy named Paul who went by LickCreek on the former QDMA web site, which is no defunct so I think it is OK to say that. I am in MO and we also have a Private Land Consultant for every 2 counties, and ours is excellent! I also have learned a lot from the farmers I have traded sweat labor for the opportunity to bow hunt.

Thanks again. Good luck on your projects!

Edit: Need to add that Paul has since passed away but left a legacy available on the replacement web site.

From: drycreek
28-May-17
I guess I'm lucky that almost all my plots are sandy to sandy/clay, so I've never neeeded more than a disc. I have one plot in a creek bottom that's more clay than I'd like but it sure grows a good clover crop. The only trouble is I have to catch the moisture just right to cultivate it. Too wet, and it's clumpy, too dry and it's hard clods. It's the one plot I have that I could really use a tiller on.

I keep two plots on my 217 acres in clover and usually plant the others in iron clay peas in spring and wheat/Austrian winter peas in the fall. No ag around me, mostly timber, so I don't have to offer them something unique, but just offer them something they will eat. I have quite a bit of honeysuckle, greenbriar, mulberries, blackberries, and other natural browse also. I don't have a super-high deer density at this point, so I think they are being well fed.

From: t-roy
28-May-17
Very nice Frank! It's very addictive, that's for sure!

29-May-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Thanks t-roy.

Dry Creek, I might like your situation better, especially the areage! I have a lot of competitive food sources in my area. And, plots might only work late season this year as mast production is looking superb. Here is a giant white oak that the deer and turkey love on my farm.

From: drycreek
29-May-17
I have the acorn problem on a couple places too Frank. I just move !

29-May-17
You bet, that is how I learned this is one of my better trees to hunt. I have no proof, but think deer have favorite trees. Maybe taste, security, lack of ground clutter makes it easier to locate the mast... A hunter should know which ones are preferred.

01-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
A little bit of work ahead this weekend. Pulling a spreader from the CO-OP is more difficult due to distance than spreading with 3 point equipment. Can't customize this way though.

From: willliamtell
01-Jun-17
Good plot discussion. In my experience, favorite trees can due to several things: the tree is in a place deer feel comfortable, it consistently drops a good crop of acorns, and the acorns are tasty! There's one white oak on the place I hunt that consistently produces lots of big acorns that are so sweet you can barely taste any tannic acid. Needless to say, it is a deer magnet. I've germinated and planted some of those acorns - we'll see how they take.

02-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Here is the clover/rye/wheat one week later. Clover really thickened up. We have not had moisture in over 2 weeks. None in the 10 day forecast. Could be a disaster.

By planting this last fall, planting beans last month, and then planting brassicas in July gives some insurance against unusual weather. 'Some' being the key word.

02-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Here is the clover/rye/wheat one week later. Clover really thickened up. We have not had moisture in over 2 weeks. None in the 10 day forecast. Could be a disaster.

By planting this last fall, planting beans last month, and then planting brassicas in July gives some insurance against unusual weather. 'Some' being the key word.

02-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Here is the clover/rye/wheat one week later. Clover really thickened up. We have not had moisture in over 2 weeks. None in the 10 day forecast. Could be a disaster.

By planting this last fall, planting beans last month, and then planting brassicas in July gives some insurance against unusual weather. 'Some' being the key word.

02-Jun-17
Good looking property your hard work will pay off this fall.

03-Jun-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Thanks! Over 1 mile of perimeter burn barrier chiseled this morning.

03-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Many birds including Turks already feeding in that freshly turned soil. During spring through early fall I have an area once per month I turn to maintain a dusting area. One of the little things I do to try and make my place just a little more attractive.

Hard to keep up with a nearby farm. This approximately 8 acres is in the second year of former crop land being converted to native prairie. Grasses take at least three years to be widely distributed. Until then native forbs, aka wild flowers dominate. It is beautiful, the picture does not do it justice.

From: Mark Watkins
03-Jun-17
Looking good to say the least!

The "Paul" you are referring to....is it Paul Knox from SE IA?

Mark

03-Jun-17
Yes, and thanks.

03-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
10 years and still fighting serecia. Highly aggressive plant that the state made a mistake years ago using in wash out areas along roadsides.

50 gallon tank, 1quart Remedy Ultra (less expensive than Pasture Guard) and 1 pint of surfactant. A little over 4 acres this method with each tank.

03-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
An area about 10 acres that I left out of the original CRP contract, but I had planted to the same natives in the areas under contract, is now being farmed this year.

It is in soybeans. 4 years of farming it should qualify it for CRP next time, assuming the program still exists.

04-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Wanted proof the broadcast method for beans works. Without rain soon it will be a total loss. Next ten days forecast is high 80s, low 90s.

Glad we pulled out of the Paris Accord, yet still convinced we have climate change.

Gobblers still singing this morning. Doesn't get much better than that!

04-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Rainbow minus the rain. First light this morning.

04-Jun-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Rainbow minus the rain. First light this morning.

04-Jun-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
A very simple home away from home, but functional.

04-Jun-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo

From: Paul@thefort
04-Jun-17
"big boys and their toys" Looks like a LOT of FUN. Paul

04-Jun-17
It is a labor of love!

One of my favorite stories to share is when Robin first came to see the farm in April of 2007. We had purchased it in February.

When I said "isn't it beautiful?", She responded how quiet it was, there were no birds even.

The tillable had been put into fescue because the ground could not even grow soybeans any longer due to being abused. The fescue butted right up to the mature hardwoods.

Today, we own a noisy farm! All kinds of birds, yotes etc. Habitat improvements made our farm so much more attractive to all kinds of wildlife. The transformation has to be seen to be believed.

Thanks.

17-Jun-17
We finally received rain two nights ago. 1.5" and it is raining hard again right now.

The beans are coming in!

17-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
We finally received rain two nights ago. 1.5" and it is raining hard again right now.

The beans are coming in!

17-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
The clover looks good. The cover crops must have protected it through the dry period. I will mow this down and hopefully post a picture this fall of the volunteer wheat and rye. Timing the mow is critical.

17-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
The serecia sprayed looks effective.

17-Jun-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
On another thread someone pointed out the benefits of pollinators and how critical they are to any legitimate habitat project.

All of the restored prairie should definitely include forbs (wild flowers) and all in my area that I am aware of or have participated in do.

30-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Over 4" of rain the last several days. First photo is my broadcasted beans, second is my rent farmer. My soil has been in food plots for ten years with intense rotations, well fertilized and lime. His is a first year crop in soil just out of native grasses for the last ten years.

30-Jun-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo

30-Jun-17

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Hopefully you can see the browse clippings.
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Hopefully you can see the browse clippings.
The clover and beans are being hammered. It rained last night and by the time I arrived at noon there were turkey tracks every where.

30-Jun-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Notice the clipped stems. This is only four acres which is enough for beans in farm country where there are lots of other fields.
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Notice the clipped stems. This is only four acres which is enough for beans in farm country where there are lots of other fields.

30-Jun-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
The mast and berry production is like I have never seen on my farm before. Native food should be plentiful this year.

I will try and mow the clover Monday if it is dry enough. The 1 acre of brassicas and beets will be planted some time in July. I will broadcast rye grain into my beans in early September, and also broadcast some into the bean crop field after it is harvested, weather permitting.

01-Jul-17
The Micro Habitat thread got me thinking about something. I wish I had Pat's resources so I could afford a drill, and if I am dreaming it might as well be a no-till variety:)

But, as you can see one can get solid results with broadcasting. So, I would rather have more horse power with a tractor because I have heavy Missouri clay gumbo. I have broadcasted about everything, and with a proper drag and packer it almost always works out fine. Yes, I use more seed, but it would take a lot of that and even the more fuel used before it would pay to have a drill. So, given my circumstances I would opt for more power and spend my money there. If I do spray RU, yes I will crush more plants than if I had planted in rows. But, if I have a good clean seed bed and get quick enough growth this is usually not a problem. I am also not looking for yields, so some weeds are variety deer and other critters find acceptable.

I wanted to document some of this because some times I read posts that are just the opposite of my experience. When I was first beginning, I would take most of it as gospel. Now, it seems results vary widely because of so many different variables. Thanks.

From: drycreek
01-Jul-17

drycreek's embedded Photo
drycreek's embedded Photo
Interesting stuff HW. I've thought about broadcasting into my IC peas but I'm afraid of failure I guess. Timing on peas would be a little tricky I'm thinking because the life of peas is directly tied to how much moisture we get here. If I understand correctly, you broadcast into beans when the leaves start to turn yellow, and depend on the leaves to cover your seed. I too, would love to have a drill. More for the time saving side of things I guess. I have always just sprayed, disced, seeded, and run a drag over it. It works, but it's time consuming and you always are dealing with the legacy seeds of whatever is in your ground. Some plots turn out better than others. Here is a IC pea plot planted the last week in April. The picture was last week.

01-Jul-17
Awesome plot!

Yes, I do broadcast into yellowing beans. The timing is more about making sure enough sunlight gets through.

I will green manure the rye early next spring as I need to still build the soil. So I still have to turn ground.

Best wishes and very nice results!

From: MDW
02-Jul-17
Interesting stuff there HW, it gives me food for thought on my own place, especially the bean broadcasting. I also have no drill and figured it to be a waste of time & money to broadcast.

02-Jul-17
Marvin, It works with beans, corn, Milo, sunflower etc. I fertilize, then disc, seed, drag and pack.

Some seed might get too deep to make it, so I seed heavy. The different depths usually cause a longer time for the plants to germinate but my experience is this keeps the beans more attractive over a slightly longer time period.

Tri-Star Seed has a chart available that gives seeding rates for broadcast and drill.

Good luck!

From: t-roy
02-Jul-17
IMO, successfully broadcasting cereal grains into standing crops is most dependent on getting adequate moisture to get them to sprout. It does help a bunch getting additional sunlight to them though. I've had really good success seeding into both corn and soybeans here in Iowa, generally seeding in late August-early September and, like HW stated above, I seed extra heavy.

BTW, your stuff is looking good HW!

02-Jul-17
Thank you ! Totally agree about moisture, and it is usually around Labor Day when I do it.

I am sure you have better results in IA;)

From: drycreek
02-Jul-17

drycreek's embedded Photo
drycreek's embedded Photo
Thanks for the compliment HW, but not all is gravy in my food plots. I had about a quarter acre of IC peas, (part of a larger plot), that was literally taken over by pig weed. I had to either spray or mow, so since the shredder was on my tractor, down it came. I don't think the seeds were viable yet, but I don't know. They weren't ripe looking yet, so maybe I did some good. We will see.

02-Jul-17
It's always something!

I just finished mowing the clover. At least 20 rabbits squirted out. Deer beds and major browsing real evident from the tractor seat.

Tons of grasshoppers which explains all of the turkey tracks going into the clover.

Even kicked up a nice velvet buck, 3 points each side. Stood there and looked at me for 10 seconds or so. Probably wondering why I was destroying his sanctuary. Made my day though!

03-Jul-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Sprayed Gly today on the area to be planted in brassicas later this month.

Unloaded remaining fertilizer needed, 4500 lbs total waiting to be broadcasted.

08-Jul-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Here is the clover one week after mowing. Unfortunately, all of the forecasted rain has been taken out.

08-Jul-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
This is why I am not a big proponent of heavy herbicides. Look at the center of this picture. This is the broadcasted beans. See the weed clipped right along with the beans?

I used to strive for magazine picture quality plots until I realized deer are like most humans. They prefer a buffet over a single food item.

From: Stickthrower
10-Jul-17
Very nice Frank. You have a great looking camp as well.

15-Jul-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Thanks Bryan. It is VERY plain and simple to what has been posted here before, but we are happy and know we have been blessed.

Disced, fertilized and drug the brassica, radish, sugar beet plot today. Will hand broadcast tomorrow and pack. The rain in the forecast has been taken out.

Clean bed to plant in. Turned 3 times and sprayed once. This is the narrow, long plot that drops down to the broadcasted beans. Hope the pictures are OK.

16-Jul-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Finished plot.

16-Jul-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Finished plot.

16-Jul-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Finished plot.

16-Jul-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Finished plot.

25-Jul-17
On other threads some posters have stated they do not recommend turning more than a couple of inches of soil. I think they are concerned about weed seeds that might be buried deeper getting enough sunlight to germinate? Hoping to get feedback on this.

The picture above (sorry about the quadruple post!) is soil turned 2 times, waiting a few weeks, then turned again and planted immediately. When I have done this with an aggressive growing leafy plant like brassica I have had minimal weed competition.

I have always thought the multiple turns exposed and then killed most of the seed. The turning was a disc first to get the new growth in early spring. About 1 month later I chiseled it. Then sprayed after a few weeks, then disced again a few weeks after that and planted.

I like to chisel and have always felt cutting the soil deep allows for quicker root development of plants since the soil is easier to grow through? Also helps get moisture down deeper instead of running off. (With no till the dead root channels accomplish this.) I think I am getting solid results but wonder now based on what some of you are saying.

Yes, it does take extra fuel, but I find it relaxing as well. Please share your thoughts, thanks.

07-Aug-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
We have had less than .25" of rain since the brassica plot was planted. Less than 1 hour from the farm there has been severe rain fall and flood warnings. We have had over 4" at our home in the last ten days.

Praying for rain.

07-Aug-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
We have had less than .25" of rain since the brassica plot was planted. Less than 1 hour from the farm there has been severe rain fall and flood warnings. We have had over 4" at our home in the last ten days.

Praying for rain.

12-Aug-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
We received another .2". The firm, packed seed bed is keeping it alive but we need a soaker bad.

12-Aug-17

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Close up
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Close up

12-Aug-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Beans that were broadcasted. Plenty of pods but need rain bad to fill them out.

From: drycreek
12-Aug-17
HW, I plant much the same as you. This spring, I began discing in March. Some plots were mowed (wheat), then disced. Others were sprayed, mowed, then disced. I usually tailor my discing to what I see growing. If it's pretty bare, I almost straighten my gangs, disc, seed and fertilize, then drag. This year I'm adding a cultipacker to my implements. Just loaded it up today, taking it to my place tomorrow. I hope it's worth what I paid for it !

Another thing I'm gonna do this fall is throw and mow in a couple pea plots that are still green and leafy. Probably gonna do it around the first of September so if I don't get germination I'll have time to punt. This will be my first attempt at no till, so wish me luck !

13-Aug-17
Good luck drycreek! I am doing some Throw and Grow today as we have rain chances several days this week. It is going around a blind a youngster will be using trying to get their first deer.

I think you will wonder why you waited on a packer. Mine has saved me numerous times when an unusually dry period occurred.

Best wishes!

13-Aug-17

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Kasco packer, 8'
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Kasco packer, 8'

19-Aug-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Close-up
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Close-up
.3" of rain this past week. Heavy rain all around but missing us. Brassica is OK but beans and clover are really stressed.

From: spike78
19-Aug-17
If that was in MA your beans would be over your head. All it's done is rain here. Course you would only have a handful of deer here too lol.

19-Aug-17
Spike, It has been really wet all around the farm. Flash floods warnings regularly. It is really weird that it keeps missing.

20-Aug-17
Received 1" over the last 24 hours. Thank God! More forecasted.

24-Aug-17
We received another 1.75" of rain early Tuesday at the farm. Cannot wait to see it this weekend.

FYI, we received 12" at home. Lots of damage at some of our neighbors and some live-stock lost! No human fatalities, thank God!

26-Aug-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
2.75" total. Sure helped a lot!

27-Aug-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Got up this morning for a walk. Saw some deer walking through the brassica last evening and just wanted to see if they were browsing it this early.

Standing by my big lone oak tree, which is dropping acorns already. Several Turks came walking right through the tall NG right up to me. No doubt to feed on the mast.

27-Aug-17

Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Broadcasted beans are over my knees and have lots of pods.

From: drycreek
27-Aug-17
Your beans look good Frank ! I'm glad you're getting some rain finally. I sure wish I could give some away ! Harvey has blessed the lower part of Texas with 10"/20"+ :-) ! My plans for next week are toast ! What is it they say, man plans, and God laughs ? The folks on the coast are hurting, and will be for some time. It's just gonna cost me a week, and a little inconvenience up here where I live, so I ain't bitching. Only one place that I plot will be greatly affected, and I was gonna start with it next week, but oh well, I'll change my plans now. A select timber cut was just finished Friday on my place, and just in time. I spent most of yesterday on my dozer and tractor, cleaning up the timber haul roads and burning some slash left in the sets. Mowed a few plots that I had glyed about 8 days ago. I'm pretty much ready to plant when it dries up a little.

27-Aug-17
We have good friends in northern TX, and so far they have ONLY received 10". Glad you are OK.

It started raining as I left today, and it might have been a soaker. We need more!

Thanks and good luck!

27-Aug-17
1.5" today! Prayers answered.

02-Sep-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Brassica is doing wonderful.

02-Sep-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
This is the updated picture.

02-Sep-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Indian Grass is in full bloom. Love when August is finished!

Happy Labor Day all.

03-Sep-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
Burn barrier ready for next spring. Also a good dusting place for Turks and identify where game likes to enter and exit the timber.

10-Sep-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
The Indian grass is in full bloom. My picture taking ability does not do it justice.

From: Bowhntn
10-Sep-17
Awesome Frank! Any trail pics yet?

10-Sep-17
Thanks Brian. Cameras will start next weekend.

From: Bowhntn
10-Sep-17
Can't wait to see what comes to that buffet!

10-Sep-17
I believe it will be slow early season. Lots of acorns and persimmons.

From: drycreek
10-Sep-17

drycreek's embedded Photo
drycreek's embedded Photo
Frank, I put my two throw and mow plots in Saturday. I planted a mix of wheat, oats, Austrian winter peas, and a little Daikon radish. My peas were getting pretty ragged so I thought I'd better do it before the leaves were completely gone. Need some rain now !

11-Sep-17
Looks good! We need rain bad, but not as much as FL. Keep us posted please.

23-Sep-17

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Habitat for Wildlife's embedded Photo
A week's worth of 90 degree weather and no rain since the .2".

I wonder if a guy putting out corn feels the same way I do after a long, unusually hot and dry spell?

From: drycreek
23-Sep-17
Frank, my throw and mow was a bust. Hogs ate all the seed. I had to disc, re-seed, and drag like always. I won't be trying that again. On the bright side, I think I got a good rain down there Wednesday afternoon. I certainly needed it. I'm putting my hog trap back up next week and try to catch some of these buzzards. My buddy killed two this morning, that makes around 10/12 this year we've killed, and only a few hundred thousand to go.......

23-Sep-17
Sorry to hear about the hog problem! That is worse. Good luck on getting rid of them. Hope they eat good as well, I mean for your family to enjoy them:)

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