Slick Trick Broadheads
Trekking Poles
Mountain Goat
Contributors to this thread:
GameEarGabe 17-Jun-17
Bou'bound 17-Jun-17
timberdoodle 17-Jun-17
Scrappy 17-Jun-17
Backpack Hunter 17-Jun-17
PECO 17-Jun-17
Vids 17-Jun-17
wyobullshooter 17-Jun-17
TreeWalker 18-Jun-17
Russell 18-Jun-17
dakotaduner 18-Jun-17
wyobullshooter 18-Jun-17
g5smoke21 18-Jun-17
DEMO-Bowhunter 18-Jun-17
Trial153 18-Jun-17
jims 18-Jun-17
ursman 18-Jun-17
TD 18-Jun-17
Russell 18-Jun-17
WV Mountaineer 18-Jun-17
GameEarGabe 19-Jun-17
GameEarGabe 19-Jun-17
huntinelk 19-Jun-17
huntabsarokee 19-Jun-17
greg simon 19-Jun-17
Kurt 19-Jun-17
smarba 19-Jun-17
DeanMan 19-Jun-17
GameEarGabe 19-Jun-17
WV Mountaineer 20-Jun-17
huntabsarokee 21-Jun-17
standswittaknife 21-Jun-17
BTM 21-Jun-17
Medicinemann 21-Jun-17
GameEarGabe 22-Jun-17
GameEarGabe 22-Jun-17
TD 22-Jun-17
Medicinemann 23-Jun-17
Waterdawg 27-Jun-17
Mad Trapper 28-Jun-17
From: GameEarGabe
17-Jun-17
Looking for advice on trekking poles for and upcoming goat hunt. Recommend brands would be great. Thanks

From: Bou'bound
17-Jun-17
Black diamond but don't overthink this. A decent lever lock pair will be all you need.

From: timberdoodle
17-Jun-17
The black diamond trail shock pros have been good for me. Some people don't like the extra ounce or two that they weigh. I think it's worth it. Flick locks seen to be a bit more robust than twist locks. If you add rubber tip protectors they're fairly quiet. They can always be taken off for ice. If you get into talus, the rocKS might pull them off for you.

From: Scrappy
17-Jun-17
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00EJP43FA/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_10?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

30 bucks off of amazon, I just got them last week. A ton of guys recommends them from over on the rokslide.

17-Jun-17
Black Diamond Trails have worked well for me for years.

From: PECO
17-Jun-17
As mentioned Black Diamond are great poles. I went with Leki and am very satisfied. If you have an REI in the near, go there and check out trek poles. They have the top brands, see what is comfortable for you.

From: Vids
17-Jun-17
Sierra Trading Post website has several kinds at a good discount. I recently bought a pair of Komperdell lever lock carbon poles and like them a lot. They are lighter than aluminum and don't clink as loudly if they hit something. I haven't hunted with them yet, and have heard that aluminum are stronger but so far so good for these. My last pair was Black Diamond aluminum twist style and they worked fine too. Like Bou said you don't need to overthink this, any good set of poles will work.

17-Jun-17
Yep, lots of good options. I'm very pleased with my Leki Corklites.

From: TreeWalker
18-Jun-17
One pole. One straight handle ice axe.

When sidehilling, axe is used on your uphill side. If you encounter ice or very vertical terrain, you will curse not having the axe.

From: Russell
18-Jun-17
Goat hunted in BC last Aug/Sept and no snow. (Aint gona hunt goats on ice and snow)

I used Black Diamond Flick Lock Alpine Carbon Cork with the rubber screw-in tips.

Besides my guide, these two poles were my best friends. Made hiking the mountains sooo much easier and safer. Much better balance.

From: dakotaduner
18-Jun-17
Leki served me well. Maybe someone else will chime in but I was warned about chipmunks eating cork grips on some poles. Never happened to me but that would suck.

18-Jun-17
It's certainly possible chipmunk's could be drawn to the salt in the cork due to sweating hands. Kinda hard for them to get to where I keep mine, so luckily not a concern. ;-)

From: g5smoke21
18-Jun-17
Do you guys tend to use the carbide tips or the rubber more?

18-Jun-17
Black Diamond carbon with the rubber tips for my goat hunt last year. Really glad I had them coming off the mountain loaded thru a bunch of tangled mess.

From: Trial153
18-Jun-17
Go with carbon for weight saving and quietness. Also stay with lever locks vs twist or button. Leki, mountain smith and black diamond all make good pole. A top end set will run under 200. Worth every penny

From: jims
18-Jun-17
As mentioned above take a look at Sierra Trading's website. You can likely get great poles or around 1/2 price! I bought Leki's from Sierra several years ago and have used and abused them on 2 sheep and 2 mtn goat hunts...worked like a charm. Make sure to look at the reviews on poles you are interested in. Some locking systems are a lot better than others. It's nice to have poles that are short enough to fit in luggage for airlines....check overall length of your airlines bag before buying them. Lighter weight poles will be an advantage on trips where you are limited on weight for bush flights....plus lighter for carrying around!

I would see an advantage to buying poles with rubber or some quiet material over the tips.....you may be able to make them from tubing. I'm sure game can hear the clanging of poles on rock from miles away! Have a great goat hunt!

From: ursman
18-Jun-17
I've had the rubber tips punched through by the metal tips which the rubber covers. The result is a clicking noise when the metal tip hits the rocks. Might want to carry an extra pair of rubber tips.

From: TD
18-Jun-17
I like the cork grips..... foam gets pretty funky over time and hard to clean..... Have the BD Ergo model with the angled grips. Had broken both my wrists long time ago (separate accidents too....) and they like the angle much better than the straight ones.

Psssst.... don't tell Coach, I got her straight foam grip BD Z with leverlock tops....... she thinks they're the best thing since sliced bread.....

From: Russell
18-Jun-17
Buy a couple sets of the screw-in rubber tips. I wore out one set on my hunt. Carry an extra set.

18-Jun-17
I wouldn't over think this and, I wouldn't spend a great deal of money either. I own two pairs of lever locks with cork handles. One is aluminum, the other pair is carbon. One pair weighs 1 pound the other 7 ounces. Together, both pairs were bought for under $60. I've walked a lot of miles with the aluminum pair and, have never had a problem. Look around, put your hands on some. God Bless

From: GameEarGabe
19-Jun-17
Thank you for the all the help.

From: GameEarGabe
19-Jun-17
Thank you for the all the help.

From: huntinelk
19-Jun-17

huntinelk's embedded Photo
huntinelk's embedded Photo
I've had good luck with Black Diamond. Not sure what model I have, you can see one of them in the background of this picture. They are the lever lock style.

19-Jun-17
I just switched to the Black Diamond Distance Z in carbon. I did so because they are lighter and they pack smaller than the aluminum poles I own. Down side is they are not as adjustable in size. Before I wasn't carrying my poles every day although I would have liked to have them some days. The smaller size and weight should keep them in my pack all the time.

From: greg simon
19-Jun-17
Good advice above. The main thing with trekking poles on a goat hunt is to bring a pair!

From: Kurt
19-Jun-17
Black Diamond 3-piece round aluminum, non-shock absorber style with flick locks in the 145 mm length for me. The longer poles work better for setting up the Sil-Tarp II that I always carry for an emergency shelter, as well as for cross-country ski poles when I screw on the big baskets. Mine are about 5 years old and get used year around for hunting, hiking and skiing.

I've had failures with all my "cheap poles" whether it was slipping joints or strap failures.........guess I got what I paid for. Note that I've not tried the Costco poles that many have had decent luck with.

From: smarba
19-Jun-17
Be sure you get the rubber tips that have a metal washer in them that fits around the carbide pole tip - you'll almost never wear through those rubber tips. Also I glue mine on with household goop or similar, as they can get pulled off by sticking into tundra, cracks between rocks, etc.

Agree that you want 2. May not use 2 all the time, but when it comes to packing meat having 2 is huge benefit. Also run your hand UP through the wrist strap, like you're supposed to do with ski poles. Makes it where you don't have to rely on hand strength to grip the handle. 90% of photos or videos I see of guys with poles, they let the loop hang down and reach horizontally through it. Totally wrong: try it you'll like it.

From: DeanMan
19-Jun-17
Leki with the cork handle. What ever brand you get I suggest you go with a cork handle it will be more comfortable than any other rubber handle.

From: GameEarGabe
19-Jun-17
I just went to REI and looked at a few different sets. I really liked the Black Diamond Carbon Z. Extremely light and break down small. They are a fixed length when in use. How many times have you guys used poles and had them set at different lengths for side hilling??

20-Jun-17
Never for side hilling here. But, it's dang nice when going up and down to be able to adjust the over all length according to the steepness of the terrain. They are a LIFE saver down hilling heavy if you can get them long enough for your forearm and pole angle to remain roughly a 90 degree angle when you load the pole with weight. God Bless

21-Jun-17
Gabe Besides the z poles they make another 1 with a 3 letter name with z in the middle. Same principle as the z pole but it has like 20 cm of adjustment so should adjust enough if you are worried about side hilling. The z poles have a longer foam handle than my previous poles. I believe the design is so you can grab on top or down lower if you need a shorter pole.

21-Jun-17
boubound in the first post nailed it. the lever lock is important. I also like the three piece takedown for packability

From: BTM
21-Jun-17
Been using an old pair of ski poles for many hikes, a sheep hunt, and a goat hunt. Two bucks at a thrift store. They barely fit into my bow/rifle case. (Yes, I'm a cheap bas.....)

From: Medicinemann
21-Jun-17
GameEarGabe, Are you going to be using these trekking poles a LOT in the future? If not, borrow my Black Diamond poles with lever locks....just return them when done.... if you break them, you just replace them....Be sure to read what TreeWalker wrote.....his comments are spot on, in my opinion. Depending on where you live in Pennsylvania, you might be able to drive over and get them.....I am only five minutes from the Pa. state line, 45 minutes east of Erie, Pa.

From: GameEarGabe
22-Jun-17
Thanks medicine I'm on the other side of the state just outside of Philadelphia. Probably use them again when i go on a sheep hunt. What model poles do you have?

From: GameEarGabe
22-Jun-17
Thanks medicine I'm on the other side of the state just outside of Philadelphia. Probably use them again when i go on a sheep hunt. What model poles do you have?

From: TD
22-Jun-17
I'm gonna guess...... extra long...... =D

From: Medicinemann
23-Jun-17
They are 9-10 year old Black Diamonds. They have been used on multiple sheep bowhunts and a Mountain Goat bowhunt. They are eliptical in cross-section (not round), have lever locks, and are as sound as the day I bought them. As far as the model.....does it matter? If so, I can check....

From: Waterdawg
27-Jun-17
Leki Corklites - and I second TreeWalker's advice. Also, an ice axe helps level your tent bed to make your night sleep/recovery better.

From: Mad Trapper
28-Jun-17
I have a trekking pole that has an ice axe head on it. I can't remember the brand. It has the lever locks. I trashed a couple that had the screw feature. I would not recommend the poles with the screw features as they tend to unscrew at the worst times. I generally only take one pole with me on mountain hunts. The ice axe head has come in handy a few times.

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