Slick Trick Broadheads
Any tips/for killing a bighorn with a bo
Wild Sheep
Contributors to this thread:
WRO 23-Jun-17
WRO 23-Jun-17
greg simon 23-Jun-17
Ace 23-Jun-17
wkochevar 23-Jun-17
Huntcell 23-Jun-17
WRO 23-Jun-17
Medicinemann 24-Jun-17
TD 24-Jun-17
BULELK1 24-Jun-17
Charlie Rehor 24-Jun-17
Pvdesert 25-Jun-17
Kurt 25-Jun-17
Pete In Fairbanks 25-Jun-17
willliamtell 26-Jun-17
Paul@thefort 26-Jun-17
Kurt 26-Jun-17
Twanger 26-Jun-17
Mike Ukrainetz 29-Jun-17
Treeline 29-Jun-17
From: WRO
23-Jun-17

WRO's embedded Photo
My pregnant wife's cali from a few years back.
WRO's embedded Photo
My pregnant wife's cali from a few years back.
My hunting partner drew a California bighorn tag here in Oregon and is looking for tips to be successful with a bow. we've both helped on several sheep hunts and finding one won't be an issue, how to kill it though with a bow will more challenging...

From: WRO
23-Jun-17

WRO's embedded Photo
My pregnant wife's cali from a few years back.
WRO's embedded Photo
My pregnant wife's cali from a few years back.
My hunting partner drew a California bighorn tag here in Oregon and is looking for tips to be successful with a bow. we've both helped on several sheep hunts and finding one won't be an issue, how to kill it though with a bow will more challenging...

From: greg simon
23-Jun-17
I don't know a lot about sheep hunting, but your friend has already done the hard part. Drawing the tag! Congratulations and good luck!!!

From: Ace
23-Jun-17
The best Sheep Hunter I know once said: "If you want to kill a sheep with a bow, leave your rifle at home."

From: wkochevar
23-Jun-17
You'll need to get close....Just kidding! I'm sure you guys will get it done. I would love to have the opportunity just to give it try! Good Luck, Kip

From: Huntcell
23-Jun-17

Huntcell 's embedded Photo
Huntcell 's embedded Photo
Get above em and practice steep angle shots!!!

From: WRO
23-Jun-17
is it better to come on from below, same elevation, or above? we've got the basics down and the target ram has already been found..

From: Medicinemann
24-Jun-17
if you do a search on Bowsite, you will find a lot of helpful hints and experiences that you can learn from....Keep a positive attitude and be persistent.

From: TD
24-Jun-17
Ace x2. That guy Ace refers to knows his sheep stuff.......

Nothing on bighorns so take it for every penny you paid...... sheep in general.... you can't get away with a great deal a long ways away. They are wired for movement and out of place from an insane distance... I've spotted and glassed them a 1/2 mile up to a mile or more and they are bunched up and all staring right at you.... but get inside 40 yards or closer.... it's amazing how much you can get away with.....

And they consider themselves king of the high mountain. They look for danger from below. Above them gives you an edge.

Both those theories were confirmed and told to me from said Best Sheep Hunter I know above..... in reasoning why..... I wondered if maybe they couldn't see all that well short range or maybe being a social herd animal they were more used to movement closer up...... I was told their weakness was their pure arrogance that nothing can get close to them in their Kingdom....... I take such advice to heart.....

Good luck to you folks! It can and will be done. And don't bring a gun.....

From: BULELK1
24-Jun-17
'is it better to come on from below, same elevation, or above? we've got the basics down and the target ram has already been found'

The lay of the land---wind currents----position of the Ram----ect.

It is really a combination of many factors that will dictate what and how ya arrow him.

Good luck, Robb

PS-The less people ~~ the Better for stalking on them.

24-Jun-17
Sounds like you got the hard part all figured out. The only advice you need is Ace's.

From: Pvdesert
25-Jun-17
Mental and physical preparation are the most important in my opinion! 'Heavy on the mental'. I second the notion on leave the gun at home. If are lucky enough to have help, especially from bowhunters, it will help you a lot. I was lucky enough to take a Desert with my bow this last fall and I have to say that the mental part of believing you can do it and a great support team around you is of the upmost importance. Read my post under bow hunting desert bighorns --- it may help you, believe and best of luck.

From: Kurt
25-Jun-17
Stalk them from above after you have located them from across the valley. Wait untill the thermals are right (up) before stalking in from above. A buddy over at the glassing spot to give you pre-worked out signals in case the sheep move is great help. A white game bag on a long pole is easy to see. Cell phones/radios aren't fair chase for P&Y.

Some of my really good memories are stalking Colorado bighorns (had six ram tags over the years and arrowed two) and my Nevada desert big horn hunt (one for one!).

Good luck to your hunting buddy! Not too many things are better than arrowing a nice ram!!

25-Jun-17
I would offer the idea that you watch your band of sheep for a day or two. There may be certain times of day when they are in terrain that is more suitable for you to stalk in close. In real open country, you take a much greater chance of buggering them off. Don't bother even trying in open places. Wait until they feed into a place where you have a better chance. Better yet, get yourself into a place like that and wait for them to move to you.

Do not underestimate how important wind direction is. I've observed a tendency for novice sheep hunters to be so wrapped around the axle with sheep eyesight, that they don't pay enough attention to the wind. Don't sacrifice wind just to stay out of sight. It will never work!

Take all of this with a grain of salt though. My experience is only with Dalls. I have never hunted the dirty looking brown ones...! I only wish!

Pete

From: willliamtell
26-Jun-17
Give yourself plenty of time, and be mentally prepared to spend all of it.

From: Paul@thefort
26-Jun-17
spend 80% of the hunt scoping the rams to figure out there daily patterns and watch for places where they bed that the hunter has chance to get into their effective range. Rams may bed down for awhile but can change locations once the hot sun is on them. Look out for other animals along the way as they can jump up and spoil the stalk. if the ram is across the valley or drainage, draw a map of the hillside where the ram is and local land marker so the hunter can find the animal as he circles around. Yes, coming in from above is best if the wind is coming up the hill. One may only get one shooting opportunity so take it easy. These are grand animals for sure. Paul

From: Kurt
26-Jun-17
Paul is right about the drawing the map.......or easier yet is to take a photo on your phone so you can readily find the spot where he is (was) bedded. Things look a lot different once you are on the other side.

From: Twanger
26-Jun-17
Just keep at it. It took my 13 days and 18 stalks to kill my first ram with a bow. I thought that I had one dead to rights more than once and they would see me even when not moving and in full camo. Amazing but sooner or later it will happen if you keep at it and have faith. The second ram only took 6 days and 3 stalks but not because I was necessarily better. Things just worked out sooner. You put yourself in position and then they have to look away at the right time or walk behind something or....

29-Jun-17
It totally depends on the area, some places they are half stupid and you can act like a hiker and walk right up to them and shoot them. And they are easy to find and refind. Other places and times of the year they are very spooky and you can only hope for one good chance. Talk to others who have hunted them in the same place, same time of year. Anything else is just guessing...

From: Treeline
29-Jun-17
I like Kurt's idea of taking a picture with your phone. Never thought about that...

Hunting mule deer above treeline I typically pick a number of reference points on my stalk route and memorize them all the way to my planned shooting location. Sheep tend to get up at different times during the day, so it can be a bit tougher and you have to change your reference points mid-stalk.

Thinking that you will be hunting them in lower country if you are after California sheep. A gillie suite will probably work really well if there are trees/brush. They don't work very well above treeline here in CO, though.

One thing I have noticed is that sheep don't seem to be bothered by rocks rolling - high or low.

Hunting sheep, goats or ibex I have noticed that they seem to lose their vision in that late evening time frame. If you have worked in and run out of cover or wind, sometimes it works out to just sit tight where you think they will come out in the evening to feed. Seems like they will give you a couple of seconds trying to make you out if you are inside 50 yards - especially late in the evening.

You can funnel them. Keep an eye out for areas where they funnel down on trails going from bedding areas to feeding areas and you may find a great ambush spot.

Sometimes, you can get a second chance. Be ready for it. I missed my Dall on my first shot and killed him when he came back down to the trail to see what that was that hit the trail between his feet on that first shot.

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