3Rivers Archery Supply
Velvet Euro Mounts
Mule Deer
Contributors to this thread:
'Ike' (Phone) 06-Jul-17
fubar racin 06-Jul-17
Zackman 08-Jul-17
TD 08-Jul-17
Treeline 09-Jul-17
MathewsMan 09-Jul-17
BOWUNTR 09-Jul-17
BOWUNTR 09-Jul-17
wkochevar 09-Jul-17
'Ike' (Phone) 10-Jul-17
FullCryHounds 10-Jul-17
cnelk 10-Jul-17
MathewsMan 10-Jul-17
BOWUNTR 10-Jul-17
06-Jul-17
Could you post yours up if you don't mind...

From: fubar racin
06-Jul-17

fubar racin's embedded Photo
fubar racin's embedded Photo
My wife's first buck.

From: Zackman
08-Jul-17

Zackman's embedded Photo
Zackman's embedded Photo
They are kind of a pain to do. I have three that worked out and a couple others that didn't. The one on the left is a blacktail with a reproduction skull. The right one is a blacktail and the bottom a Coues'. Both of those are the natural skulls and they are difficult for me to get perfectly white without ruining the velvet. I'm sure a professional could do much better.

From: TD
08-Jul-17

TD's embedded Photo
TD's embedded Photo
Zackman x2. Velvet euros are a PITA.

I use the bugs, but they'd likely eat the velvet before anything else, so the antlers can't go in the box. Clean up head as good as you can and drill from the back of the skull up through the pedicle and into the antler. That gives you your reference when you have to put them back together, take a few other measurements for reference, width, etc. Then using a narrow kerf bone saw cut the antlers off at their base. Once that is done the skull goes into the bug box.

I hang the antlers with an eye screw in the hole that was drilled and using a needle I'll inject Velvet Tan at the base (most taxi places sell it) Make a small hole in the antler tips for fluid to escape, gravity helps some. Depending on the stage of velvet you may get a good deal of fluid or none at all. With the antler cut like that it's way easier to see the veins you want to inject. I'll come back every 15 or 20 minutes and inject some more. I'll keep that up until it's pretty much velvet tan dripping out the ends. You want to paint the entire antler with the velvet tan as well. I'll hang them like that for a day and then give em another coat and maybe try to inject some more tan. The bottle just mentions one time and let it set for a couple days, but I like to do 3 or 4 coats, a couple days in between, cure for a few more days and then you wash it all off, let it thoroughly dry and gently fluff up the velvet. Soft brush and light compressed air works well.

The head goes from the bugs to the degreasing tank for however long that takes, then whitened, sealed, ect. When everything is done I use Marine Tex epoxy and a 5/16 stainless steel threaded rod down through the hole I drilled before cutting them off. I'll set the rod and epoxy it in the skull one day and then come back and epoxy in the antlers the next. I had to make a jig for the antlers with clamps to hold everything in position. Even with the hole for alignment there is a good deal of adjusting to do. I always ask folks if they want em a little wider or they want em taller.... =D

The white Marine Tex matches the whitened bone so well that when the seams are cleaned up and sanded a bit you pretty much need a magnifying glass to see em. The antlers are on real solid.

Have 2 in the freezer right now (one of em is mine)..... they are such pain I'm kinda putting them off..... mine has been in there a couple years...... the running joke is I'm trying to test my freeze drying process.....

From: Treeline
09-Jul-17
Have an axis that was done like TD says above - cut the antlers off and then put them back together after boiling the skull. Have had some buddies do mule deer skulls with the velvet antlers and don't know how they did it.

I tried to boil out a mule deer skull and keep the velvet once. Wrapped the antlers in foil thinking it would keep the heat off. Didn't work very well...

From: MathewsMan
09-Jul-17
Beetles work well if you protect the horns

From: BOWUNTR
09-Jul-17
Tell me how to protect the horns from the beetles? They'll eat thru plastic to get to the velvet.... that's my experience anyways. Ed F

From: BOWUNTR
09-Jul-17

BOWUNTR's embedded Photo
BOWUNTR's embedded Photo

From: wkochevar
09-Jul-17

wkochevar's embedded Photo
Artificial velvet
wkochevar's embedded Photo
Artificial velvet
wkochevar's embedded Photo
The real stuff
wkochevar's embedded Photo
The real stuff

10-Jul-17
They do look good though, thanks for sharing...

10-Jul-17

FullCryHounds's embedded Photo
FullCryHounds's embedded Photo
Beetle cleaned, degreased and whitened. I can't stress the importance of taking care of the velvet in the field. Don't grab the antlers because the velvet may peal right off. Get it caped out and put the skull/antlers in a freezer as soon as possible. Doing a European with beetles can be done but it does take a bit more time because there are a few more steps involved. Just have to do everything in the right order.

From: cnelk
10-Jul-17

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo
My son's first elk. I cut off the antlers and sent them down to Huffman Taxidermy in Trinidad to freeze dry them. Very reasonable priced.

Then the skull was cleaned and whitened using beetles.

Re-attached the antlers and hung it up

From: MathewsMan
10-Jul-17
I'm not sure what the method the guy I use does with protecting the velvet from the beetles, but I do know that he does not remove the antlers to do it.

From: BOWUNTR
10-Jul-17
It's a trade secret that I can't figure out. I've tried to put plastic bags over each antler and wire them at the base... with poor results. Any other ideas. I've had a beetle colony going for 6-7 years.... Ed F

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