Carbon Express Arrows
How do I get this bull?
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
jordanathome 09-Aug-17
drycreek 09-Aug-17
jordanathome 09-Aug-17
stealthycat 09-Aug-17
Glunt@work 09-Aug-17
Nesser 09-Aug-17
jordanathome 09-Aug-17
cnelk 09-Aug-17
Big-Al 09-Aug-17
elkmtngear 09-Aug-17
Ucsdryder 09-Aug-17
Glunt@work 09-Aug-17
fubar racin 09-Aug-17
ElkNut1 09-Aug-17
jordanathome 09-Aug-17
Manager 09-Aug-17
jordanathome 09-Aug-17
Ermine 09-Aug-17
LINK 10-Aug-17
otcWill 10-Aug-17
westslope 10-Aug-17
JordanMOFLCO 10-Aug-17
Barty1970 10-Aug-17
ELKMAN 10-Aug-17
goelk 10-Aug-17
Glunt@work 10-Aug-17
TD 10-Aug-17
wyobullshooter 10-Aug-17
From: jordanathome
09-Aug-17
I think I have patterned a bull that passes through public ground at night, I have never caught site of him on public ground during daylight. I believe he uses this public to transition from private to private where he feeds and beds. I imagine the only option is to stake out as close to the location I think he is bedding and hope I catch him during legal hours?

I have concerns that #1 the location of the shot and the bull at the impact could be easily disputed if it occurs within 100 yards of the boundary and #2 even if I make the shot a more comfortable distance away from the private ground and document with GPS marks and photographs......if he does not expire before crossing the boundary now I have to deal with notifying the property owner and asking permission to retrieve the animal.

Has anyone dealt with this? I am open to suggestions. I am about ready to give up on this bull given the location challenges and pursue less risky options where I have more room to hunt.

FWIW.....I did make contact with the private property owner earlier this year asking for permission to cross (not hunt on) their ground to gain easier access to this public ground and that request was denied. I made it clear to them that I would be hunting the bordering public ground regardless of the denied permission, I would strictly be honoring their boundary, and was happy to meet with them/hoped to run into them so they knew who I was. Frustrating.

From: drycreek
09-Aug-17
If they denied you crossing, I don't think that I would risk the animal dying on their property. Could be a problem there.

From: jordanathome
09-Aug-17
I have not posted a picture of this bull. I would like to figure out a way to be successful and avoid unnecessary controversy.

From: stealthycat
09-Aug-17
when rut starts getting closer, that bull will change his patterns

From: Glunt@work
09-Aug-17
Of course its pretty hard to figure out a bull in the woods and even harder on the internet, but a lot will be changing in the next few weeks. His pattern could change and he could transition 4 miles away to where he thinks the ladies will be hanging out.

But assuming he hangs around and you get a shot its easy for a bull to make 100+ yards with a good hit and make it a miles with a bad one. That wouldn't necessarily keep me from hunting him around private. I don't want to have an unrecovered elk but if he's hunted legally and a land owner doesn't allow recovery when you and the local CPW guy/gal request permission, they are the one's responsible.

Now, the hassle of dealing with all that may suck the fun out of hunting and that could be reason enough to hunt elsewhere. I have an amazing whitetail spot on a tiny slice of public but the rancher that owns miles of the river both ways is a pain to deal with. Hunting should be enjoyable so sometimes avoiding drama is worth it even if you are completely in the right.

From: Nesser
09-Aug-17
Glunts right...that bulls habits will change this week when he strips velvet then as his testosterone rises over the next couple weeks and he starts thinking with his other head he could be 10 miles away. In Utah 2 years ago I had 30 different bulls on camera coming in to the same pond every night....they rubbed off about August 15th and disappeared.

From: jordanathome
09-Aug-17
So the lesson here is, patience padewan.

From: cnelk
09-Aug-17
Here's whats gonna happen.

Youre going to hunt for that bull and about the time you least expect it, an entirely different bull will show up in your lap and you will completely forget about bull #1 when you drop the string

From: Big-Al
09-Aug-17
If you've put this much time and effort in, you hunt him. My guess, from your trail cams pics, is that he's worth the wait--and chance he'll die on the other property. Bulls like that are rare and worth the wait, hunt, and risk. You'll second guess yourself for bailing now. Pretty sure you know that already :)

From: elkmtngear
09-Aug-17
"I have never caught site of him on public ground during daylight"

That would concern me. Unless you had confirmation in the middle of that public land of a regular passage (during daylight)...you could be wasting a lot of mornings and/or evenings.

From: Ucsdryder
09-Aug-17
How does Colorado work with a bull shot on public that dies on private? Assuming you call a warden?

From: Glunt@work
09-Aug-17
You just need permission to recover. If you suspect it will be an issue, having the local CPW officer might help with persuasion.

From: fubar racin
09-Aug-17
Weve had the problem with an animal dieing on the other side of the fence a few times in our large group. In all cases the landowner either granted us access, took us personally to retrieve the animal or once with a black bear my buddy shot sent 2 of his employees to retrieve the bear at night and bring it to us at our camp. I think for the most part even people that dont want you around dont want to see an animal wasted. I know others have had differing experiences but thats been mine.

From: ElkNut1
09-Aug-17
Regardless what the bull does I'd certainly entertain finding & hunting other bulls. Waaay to risky for me to hunt with little to no margin for error if the bull sticks around.

Yes bulls will move around as they search out or collect cows & you can bet that bull knows where refuge is & so do the cows of that area.

Nothing wrong with checking it out to see if he's around but don't worry about him if he's not! I like your idea of trying to ambush him at either a destination spot or trails leading to them. It's a coin flip for sure, fresh sign will let you know if he or other elk are there come the opener. In any case, stay mobile!

ElkNut/Paul

From: jordanathome
09-Aug-17
I think you are right Paul. I will check in but there are other areas I scouted with less confined options. But all are a drive and none are contiguous. This was my primary spot though. Hopefully the elk will moveore deeply into the public space as the rut approaches. The other areas are not as promising and much more accessible to others.

From: Manager
09-Aug-17
In Colorado. When a big game animal is wounded or dies & crosses into private property. A hunter can not follow up, unless he gets permission from the landowner. The landowner can deny. Then the next step is to contact the CPW warden. He can only ask the landowner for permission, and he can also be denied. On rare instances the hunter is SOL.

From: jordanathome
09-Aug-17
The area I will fall back on is not as active and someone has cams hanging already, so definite competition there. But that may help move elk around and private is not as much of an issue. I will wait and see how it plays out. Thx for confirming Manager.

From: Ermine
09-Aug-17
I've personally never been able to pattern elk. They have always been nomadic and random in my experience

From: LINK
10-Aug-17
I would be hard pressed to not hunt that bull. That said I would do my best to get no closer than 100-150 yards to the private. If you make a ckean shot and give him time he shouldn't go to private.

From: otcWill
10-Aug-17
From someone who knows the area you're hunting and has spent a ton of time trying to figure out a specific bull there, the short answer is: you don't. Just hunt for elk and do it in the best stuff you've found. That bull will be a ghost or on private once the season starts so don't let him derail you. If private wasn't so easily accessible there or if I didn't have personal experience with these bulls in this general area my advice might be different. Good luck

From: westslope
10-Aug-17
For me personally, those sorts of concerns would tarnish the full experience of archery elk hunting. I would move on. I prefer to be where you don't need to worry about an landowner, fence line, etc..

From: JordanMOFLCO
10-Aug-17
Thx Will!

From: Barty1970
10-Aug-17
First off, many thanks to Jordanathome for sharing his scouting and othe pre-season endeavours; nothing like scouting and hunting vicariously. Secondly, a wise man once said 'it's easier to ask for permission, than seen forgiveness'. Whilst the neighbouring private landowner says 'no', you've at least raised the matter with him; would he be amenable to a haunch of venison by way of compensation when you kill this bull [because we all know that that is EXACTLY what will happen, as per your comments regarding his current habits ;-) ] ? Just a thought If I were closer, I'd offer to come and help...but I'm a few thousand miles away. [Like, in Britain] The very best of luck and good hunting!

From: ELKMAN
10-Aug-17
You don't. Any attempt with the information/situation you have would be unethical.

From: goelk
10-Aug-17
i had the same problem. i was denied access to cross his property to get to BLM land but he help me to find another way in and the owner also gave me his cell number and his son number to help me retrieve my elk if cross onto his property. Super nice guy!!

From: Glunt@work
10-Aug-17
Whitetail hunting would look a lot different if no one hunted within a couple hundred yards of a boundary they aren't sure they will be allowed recovery permission.

From: TD
10-Aug-17
Likely what was said above..... chances of him following the same program in the same place after he's rubbed off and feeling kinda rutty are slim. Velvet antlers are tender... there's usually a reason he's in that spot at that time..... and not there at others....

WRT hunting the edges, how wide an area between private land are you looking at? After the hit many times the animal goes back the way he came from and not continue to where he was headed. If you put a good lick on him it won't matter =D Not a given he winds up on private at all..... not a given you get the shot or ever see him again for that matter.....

10-Aug-17
"I am about ready to give up on this bull given the location challenges and pursue less risky options where I have more room to hunt."

I think you've already answered your question. I agree with ELKMAN...look elsewhere.

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