Slick Trick Broadheads
1500 or 2500 HD
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
drmike 12-Aug-17
TD 12-Aug-17
3dirtdevils 12-Aug-17
Forest bows 12-Aug-17
Kodiak 12-Aug-17
Aspen Ghost 13-Aug-17
TD 13-Aug-17
boman 13-Aug-17
Paul@thefort 13-Aug-17
carcus 13-Aug-17
ElkNut1 13-Aug-17
OkieJ 13-Aug-17
shade mt 13-Aug-17
Pop-r 13-Aug-17
fisherick 13-Aug-17
SBH 13-Aug-17
kadbow 13-Aug-17
Grasshopper 13-Aug-17
320 bull 13-Aug-17
sticksender 13-Aug-17
Rickm 13-Aug-17
Mark Watkins 13-Aug-17
3dirtdevils 13-Aug-17
Candor 13-Aug-17
LINK 14-Aug-17
Scar Finga 14-Aug-17
LINK 14-Aug-17
Scar Finga 14-Aug-17
Glunt@work 14-Aug-17
drmike 14-Aug-17
Pigsticker 14-Aug-17
Scar Finga 14-Aug-17
bb 14-Aug-17
shade mt 14-Aug-17
TheTone 14-Aug-17
drmike 15-Aug-17
From: drmike
12-Aug-17
I just got back from Colorado scouting my elk area. The forest service recently closed my main entry point into my elk area to ATVs, UTVs and motorcycles; but are allowing access with licensed vehicles. I used to access this area on my ATV. Since I am limited to a licensed vehicle, I either am taking my Chevy 1500 SLT 4x4 gas or my Chevy 2500 HD diesel. The road is very rough, rocky and several shallow water crossings. I can make plus/minus cases for each vehicle. Which would you take?

From: TD
12-Aug-17
Can you make your ATV street legal? I think MT has some similar rules, licensed and registered vehicles only, I know a few folks that made their rigs street legal.

WRT the vehicles, which one handles those conditions best? Ground clearance, lockers or limited slip? Lower gearing? Shorter wheelbase may handle tighter stuff better. Which one would you mind busting up the least?

I've got a old scout that's a bit modified (and more so every few months...) folks don't know what all is going on with it, but I get guys with shiny new rigs and all the store bought bolt on lifts and mods with 22" rims and bla bla bla pull up and tell me their rig will out climb and out crawl me. I tell them no it won't, it won't go where I go, and then sit back and listen to them tell my why it will. When they run out of air.... then I tell them no it won't again. Then explain that where I go will scratch, gouge, dent, and tear that shiny mall rig all to heck, that rig will not go where I go because YOU will never take it there.... and they shut up and walk away....

From: 3dirtdevils
12-Aug-17
Trade them both In on a Dodge 2500 diesel 4x4....problem solved. On a serious note its hard for us to say without knowing all the variables. If your hauling more than the gas can handle I would opt for diesel. If the gas burner is up to the task then I would definitely go with 4x4.

From: Forest bows
12-Aug-17
2500

From: Kodiak
12-Aug-17
2500 is a lot more truck.

From: Aspen Ghost
13-Aug-17
If the 2500 is 2wd then opt for the 4wd 1500.

From: TD
13-Aug-17
AG nailed it.... I just assumed both were 4x4...... if not easy choice, leave the 2x at home.....

From: boman
13-Aug-17
I drive rough dirt roads every day for work. I tried both Ford and Chevy 4x4 diesels. On dirt roads that would get muddy they were fine, on the rough roads I'm on I was having a front end rebuilt every few months. The diesel motor was too heavy on the front end with all the jarring. Still keep a diesel for towing but when I know I'm going to be in the mud and not having to tow I take the gas everytime.

From: Paul@thefort
13-Aug-17
TD, Tom, I believer that can not be accomplished here in Colorado, ie, ATV, street legal, to access forest service land when posted.

From: carcus
13-Aug-17
Half tons are better off roading, the diesel is front heavy, don't listen to the dodge guy, I've listened to that bs for too long, I had 4 buddies that had the cummings in the dodge and I have the dreaded 6.0L, every single one of those trucks required a tow truck at one time or another, mine never has, and running better than ever!

From: ElkNut1
13-Aug-17
We have a Razor side by side ATV, we have licensed & street legal, it can be taken where any vehicle can, works for us very well. We will be hauling it to WY this year, their off roads are not designed for regular size trucks! Check with National Forest or BLM lands of Management, most just require a 15.00 sticker for ATV to leagal its use!

If not legal then 100% take the 1500, the 2500 will be a lot rougher of a ride!

ElkNut/Paul

From: OkieJ
13-Aug-17
Does the 2500 sit up higher for more clearance? If so there is the answer for me. What is sad is you have to buy a 3/4 ton truck now to get to what the old 1/2 tons were.

From: shade mt
13-Aug-17
It depends...1/2 tons usually have a little better traction simply because they are not as stiff...But tires make more of a difference than anything.

A 3/4 ton truck is simply a heavier sturdier suspension truck... I've had both, overall I prefer a 3/4 ton truck.

From: Pop-r
13-Aug-17
Motorcycles are easily licensed.

From: fisherick
13-Aug-17
Leave the 1500 and 2500 at the trailhead and use an older CJ5 jeep, Four Runner, Tacoma, Ranger, S10, etc. They are shorter, lighter and narrower than the full size trucks and will travel down the "old stagecoach trails" with less problems.

From: SBH
13-Aug-17
What are the pros to the 2500? My understanding is the 2500 has a bigger engine and more towing capabilities? You won't need either for a rough road. Is the clearance better?

From: kadbow
13-Aug-17
I would go with the 1500. I have a 2500 hd duramax and they aren't made for rough 4 wheeling, too big and heavy. Plus if it is a bad road I would rather beat up the cheaper 1500.

From: Grasshopper
13-Aug-17
First of all, its really weird the forest service would out law ATV's on a really rough road, but allow trucks. I would guess your hunting in Pitkin county - they are a bit odd. Pitkin county was considering county regulation, but thats not a FS regulation.

A new pickup can cost $50,000 plus, and an ATV can be picked up for less than 20% of that. I'd call the forest service and remind them that Trump is president and they need to get rid of all regulation. I had gas GM trucks for years, and in 2015 I bought a duramax. I quickly found out diesels suck as 4x4 rigs. My truck unloaded weighs like 8800 lbs. If you hit mud, the lag in the turbo just bogs you down and your stuck. While the diesel is great for towing, next truck I get will be gas. Also, I really like the cab and looks of my GM truck, but their 4x4 system has sucked for years. Tire hop, problems shifting in and out, and more.

I do own ATV/UTV's, and they get hauled to my hunting camp spot and driven from there.

From: 320 bull
13-Aug-17
If you take the 1500 and I would, make sure you don't have LT tires. They can't take rocks and they have a tendency bust belts. I opted for some 10ply tires last time around and went from annual flats to none in a few years

From: sticksender
13-Aug-17
If both are 4x4's, take the one you consider your beater.

From: Rickm
13-Aug-17
310 nailed it. Tires would be the deciding factor for me.

From: Mark Watkins
13-Aug-17
Buy (or borrow) an older model taco, trailer it to the trailhead and you are in business!!

Mark

From: 3dirtdevils
13-Aug-17
To each his own Jason but I have had all the big 3 manufacturers diesels and a 6.0l Chevy 2500. I tried to pull a 32' travel trailer once in a 20 mph head wind. Burned 3/4 a tank in 85 miles flat on the floor doing 60 mph. Traded it on my 1st 5.9 Cummins and never looked back. I have been over the scales at over 38,000#. We now run three 5.9 cummins and one 6.7 Cummins and they have never been towed. They range from 100k to 240k miles. I had a Duramax that went to 225k that was only towed once and a Powerstroke that went to 235k, it was only towed twice. Most all trucks will last now with proper care maintenance. Sure some models had problems when the epa implemented new emissions standards.

From: Candor
13-Aug-17
ground clearance, tires, wheel base/turning radius being equal I would take the 1/2 ton. I generally do not like the weight of a diesel offroad . And if you do get stuck and need to either dig, push or get pulled out, you will most certainly wish you were in the 1/2 ton. A dramatic difference between clearance, tires or wheel base and that would become my deciding factor.

From: LINK
14-Aug-17

LINK's embedded Photo
LINK's embedded Photo
As others said, ground clearance. I'd take this one, goes as good as any atv.

From: Scar Finga
14-Aug-17

Scar Finga's embedded Photo
So I Built this, and also have a 2015 Polaris Ranger, this will go anywhere that will:) I have about 6K total into it. A/C, heater, and 26MPG. Believe it or not, it's 2002 KIA Sportage 4X4.
Scar Finga's embedded Photo
So I Built this, and also have a 2015 Polaris Ranger, this will go anywhere that will:) I have about 6K total into it. A/C, heater, and 26MPG. Believe it or not, it's 2002 KIA Sportage 4X4.
Scar Finga's embedded Photo
Scar Finga's embedded Photo
Scar Finga's embedded Photo
It's lifted about 4.5" total. It has more ground clearance than my Polaris that is lifted 3' . Fun, Fun, Fun, off road!
Scar Finga's embedded Photo
It's lifted about 4.5" total. It has more ground clearance than my Polaris that is lifted 3' . Fun, Fun, Fun, off road!

From: LINK
14-Aug-17
Nice ride Scar.

From: Scar Finga
14-Aug-17
Thanks Link,

I saw and drone one up in Pine a few years ago, and wanted to build one ever since. It goes anywhere I am brave enough to take it.

From: Glunt@work
14-Aug-17

Glunt@work's embedded Photo
Glunt@work's embedded Photo
Either one. I guided and hunted all over Colorado in a stock F150 with no major issues. It went some amazing places but after 10 years it had its share of scars. If the road is bad enough to where actually making it in or out is an issue, you should have something more purpose built with a winch, lockers, clearance, etc. The big diesels are pretty capable but when you do get one buried they are handful.

I usually have a spare 4x4 of some sort. I've had 4Runners & Land Cruisers mostly (93-97 Land Cruiser with factory lockers is amazing) and currently have a '94 Isuzu Trooper. Neat little rig that I drive almost daily because its fun and save miles on my truck. Since Isuzu doesn't sell consumer vehicles here anymore you can pick them up cheap. The manual trans is the better bet.

So, I would probably take your 1500 but if its a serious road with potential for damage, it could make sense to buy a little used Tacoma, 4Runner, Trooper, Cherokee, etc and just sell it when you get home.

From: drmike
14-Aug-17

drmike's embedded Photo
drmike's embedded Photo
All, thanks for your thoughts and suggestions! I decided to take the 1500. Both trucks have Goodyear Wrangler A/T tires, but several good points mentioned above made me pick the 1500. Besides, it's my wife's truck! Good luck elk hunting everyone!

From: Pigsticker
14-Aug-17
Wow, I thought I upgraded when I bought a F250 Diesel this past Saturday.

From: Scar Finga
14-Aug-17
You Did!

From: bb
14-Aug-17
If I was making the decision I would choose the 1500. with good tires.

From: shade mt
14-Aug-17
Most any 4x4 can handle pretty rough roads, until ground clearance becomes a factor. Snow is another issue. In light to moderate conditions explorers SUV's ect... actually do a little better than trucks normally. But once you get in deep snow ect...the lower ground clearance causes the snow to pack under your vehicle and then they are not as good. I think we discussed this at length over on leatherwall one time.

I live back a long lane, our explorer does great until the snow gets deep, then its lower ground clearance becomes an issue. I can literally go around my wife stuck in her explorer hook my dodge 2500 up and pull her. been there done that.

From: TheTone
14-Aug-17
Pretty crazy sign posted above, especially when looking at the road. I would be very curious about the laws/rules and decision making behind it

From: drmike
15-Aug-17
I was told they closed the road to ATVs, UTVs and motorcycles is because of stream restoration that runs parallel to the logging road. The interesting thing is that from here, the stream then runs through an old mining tailings. At this point, it becomes heavily contaminated with heavy metals. :(

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