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Elk Euthanized PA
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
bdfrd24v 18-Aug-17
kentuckbowhnter 18-Aug-17
bdfrd24v 18-Aug-17
glittergoat 18-Aug-17
JL 18-Aug-17
Scooter 18-Aug-17
Pyrannah 18-Aug-17
elk yinzer 18-Aug-17
kentuckbowhnter 18-Aug-17
JL 18-Aug-17
Pyrannah 18-Aug-17
Vonfoust 18-Aug-17
kentuckbowhnter 18-Aug-17
JL 18-Aug-17
brunse 20-Aug-17
wytex 20-Aug-17
Will tell 20-Aug-17
stealthycat 20-Aug-17
tradmt 20-Aug-17
From: bdfrd24v
18-Aug-17

bdfrd24v's Link
I understand that cwd could potentially be devistating to the heard but wow! Talk about going to the wrong side of the road.

Media > Game Commission > Details 08/18/2017

ELK EUTHANIZED AFTER WANDERING INTO DISEASE MANAGEMENT AREA

HARRISBURG, PA - The Pennsylvania Game Commission today announced a trophy bull elk that wandered south of Interstate 80 and into a chronic-wasting disease (CWD) management area was euthanized by an agency wildlife conservation officer to ensure it would not bring CWD back to the elk range.

The 8- by 9-point bull has been submitted for disease testing, and results are pending.

The elk had drifted outside of Pennsylvania’s Elk Management Area, a more than 3,500-square-mile area spread over parts of nine counties, and into Disease Management Area 3. The Game Commission established DMA 3 in parts of Clearfield, Indiana and Jefferson counties to enhance surveillance, ban baiting and feeding of deer and elk and restrict the movement of high risk parts out of the area where the disease might exist. The first case of CWD within DMA 3 was found at a captive deer farm in 2014. The first case of CWD in the wild was found in June 2017, raising concerns that CWD could be spread north to the adjacent elk range.

Elk normally stay north of Interstate 80, which has historically been the southern boundary of the Commonwealth’s Elk Management Area. This elk drifted south across Interstate 80 and had been seen on several occasions less than 10 miles from where the wild, free-ranging CWD-positive antlered deer was euthanized June 7 on State Game Lands 87 in Clearfield County.

This raised concern the elk might be exposed to CWD within DMA 3 and carry it back to the elk range, where cows soon will be attracting bulls as the breeding season begins.

The elk was euthanized Aug. 7. If tests performed on the elk detect no CWD, the meat will be provided to families in need.

“It’s never an easy decision to put down an elk,” explained Wayne Laroche, the agency’s Special Assistant for CWD. “But we feel it is wise to proactively remove potentially infected animals before the disease progresses and other animals are possibly exposed.

“By taking immediate action, we hope to stop or slow CWD’s spread,” Laroche said.

The likelihood this elk would return to the Elk Management Area and interact with other elk during the pending breeding season weighed heavily in the decision to euthanize the bull, said Game Commission Executive Director Bryan Burhans.

“We acted decisively to extinguish this threat, to maintain the health of our elk herd and the whitetails that have drawn Pennsylvanians to camp country in the northern tier for centuries,” Burhans said.

Rawley Cogan, Keystone Elk Country Alliance president, concurred in the decision.

“Given the potential negative effect this bull posed to the entire elk herd, the Game Commission made the difficult, but responsible, decision to remove this animal from the population,” Cogan said. “Although not the desired outcome, it was the correct call.”

Blake Henning, Chief Conservation Officer for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation also expressed its support.

“The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation believes that CWD is a very serious issue across the country and appears to be spreading, Henning said. “We support the efforts of the Pennsylvania Game Commission to do what it feels best to reduce the spread of this disease. Individual elk may need to be removed from populations in order to reduce the likelihood of a larger number of animals coming in contact with the disease.”

In Pennsylvania, CWD has been an increasing threat. The disease also exists among wild deer in the area of southcentral Pennsylvania defined as DMA 2. Twenty-five free-ranging deer tested positive for CWD during 2016. Ten additional CWD-positive deer have been detected since, raising to 58 the total of CWD-positives detected within the DMA 2 since 2012, when CWD was first detected in Pennsylvania.

18-Aug-17
my god, what about the deer that run across I-80 into the elk area. dumb.

From: bdfrd24v
18-Aug-17
It sure had me scratching my head.

From: glittergoat
18-Aug-17
Right? And I doubt the big guy was off wandering around by his lonesome. Something smells a bit off here....

From: JL
18-Aug-17
As I understand it, the PGC bio is refusing to get rid of APR's in the CWD zone. That is counter to the science for CWD disease mitigation. As already noted, deer looking for new territory will disperse on each side of I-80. Killing an elk that went south of I-80 does nothing for the deer that disperse north of I-80 towards the elk grounds. IMO....the PGC may not be managing the deer and elk in the best interest of the herd. The PA hunters may need to call them out as CWD continues to expand there.

From: Scooter
18-Aug-17
Not surprised..... after all we are talking about the" Pennsylvania Game Commission"....

From: Pyrannah
18-Aug-17
i understand the counter argument about potential cwd deer walking above i80, but IMO, i think PGC was correct here.

they know with 100% certainty the elk was going to go back above i80. deer travel withinin a certain square mile radius, they have expanded the zones well past the cwd "hot zones" with the anticipation of containing the cwd area well below i80.

they cant control 100% of all scenarios, but why not control high risk items when they have the opportunity to do so...

its all probably a losing battle regardless, but that doesnt mean they shouldn't try.

From: elk yinzer
18-Aug-17
CWD sucks. I really hope there are some genius people working on it.

Tangential to this issue, we have a farmer lobby that doesn't want elk South of 80. The same lobby that is keeping parents from taking sons and daughters hunting on Sundays. I am all for the ideology of family farms but I don't think much of this lobby in our particular state if you can't tell.

18-Aug-17
if there are cwd deer south of i80 then there are cwd deer north of i80 too. in and around all the elk. killing the elk did nothing to stop cwd. hell they dont know if it even had it.

From: JL
18-Aug-17
Mr Jim Sweeney of the Concerned Sportsmen Of Michigan has been doing stellar work collecting and organizing data on deer issues including; APR's, management, CWD, TB and agricultural issues. You can check two of his downloads at the below website regarding deer dispersal. See "Yearling Buck Dispersal" and "Modeling Disease Mitigation Strategies".

http://www.concernedsportsmen.net/downloads.html

From: Pyrannah
18-Aug-17
"if there are cwd deer south of i80 then there are cwd deer north of i80 too. in and around all the elk. "

by that accord, the entire united states deer population has CWD

From: Vonfoust
18-Aug-17
It's unfortunate but the decision had to be made by somebody. If Laroche left it go, we all would have been sitting here 7 years later complaining that no one did anything when they had the chance. I'll give up one bull on the chance it slows this disease.

18-Aug-17
by that accord, the entire united states deer population has CWD

and every elk if they killed it because it may have had cwd.

From: JL
18-Aug-17
Vonfoust, the elk isn't the problem....it's the deer, or more directly the PGC's response to the CWD mitigation within the deer herd....at least in my opinion. There is more they could do WRT to containment and reduce the rate of spreading.

PA's CWD prevalence rate is climbing pretty quick.

""Twenty-five free-ranging deer tested positive for CWD during 2016. Ten additional CWD-positive deer have been detected since, raising to 58 the total of CWD-positives detected within the DMA 2 since 2012, when CWD was first detected in Pennsylvania.""

From: brunse
20-Aug-17
Edit

From: wytex
20-Aug-17
I'm confused, they have people watching these animals 24/7 ,365 days a year? How do they know how many have crossed back and forth at night? CWD is in the environment not just the animal. Killing that bull will do nothing to help the spread of CWD. We live right in the epicenter here in Wyoming , and hunt literally across the fence from where it was brought to be studied by WG&F. Yes it is here to stay and affects animals but we still hunt elk and deer and have great trophies running around. Don't panic. It will affect your deer herd but not decimate it. We take mature , old aged bucks every year and yes we see CWD animals and find carcasses occasionally.

From: Will tell
20-Aug-17
Put a 10 foot fence along the infected area along interstate 80 and stop the elk and deer from crossing. That be way too much money. Of course we're thinking of building a wall along the Mexican.

From: stealthycat
20-Aug-17
if I could time travel, I'd kill every elk the AG&F brought into Arkansas 30 years ago and save us the CWD disaster we now face

From: tradmt
20-Aug-17
The commission probably needed one for the office wall.

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