Moultrie Products
Countering Coyotes . . .
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Bake 21-Aug-17
elkstabber 21-Aug-17
Bake 21-Aug-17
DRR324 21-Aug-17
t-roy 21-Aug-17
DRR324 21-Aug-17
Bake 21-Aug-17
LKH 21-Aug-17
Glunt@work 21-Aug-17
svrelk 22-Aug-17
Pop-r 22-Aug-17
APauls 22-Aug-17
From: Bake
21-Aug-17

Bake's Link
I thought this was an interesting read from the standpoint of the recovery of the deer.

Anyone done anything similar?

From: elkstabber
21-Aug-17
Hmm, waiting to hear coyotes yipping to locate your deer is next level thinking.

From: Bake
21-Aug-17
What if you KNOW you hit the deer badly, but you still camp out and wait? If the coyotes find it first, how do you know it's dead? And then you still spook the thing by barging in to spook the coyotes off?

Or is that a non-issue, because the coyotes won't sing if it's not dead?

It's interesting for sure.

From: DRR324
21-Aug-17
I enjoy Bill's stories, but I have to wonder how he "watched individual hairs splitting" from the arrow entry, but then was unsure of the "exact nature of the hit"...

From: t-roy
21-Aug-17
I shot a couple of does in January several years ago. I watched one go down in the field, but the other one ran back into the timber. I was very sure it was a good shot. I went back to my shed (which was probably less than 200 yds from where I shot both does) to get my 4 wheeler and trailer to recover both deer with. While getting my stuff, I heard the yotes open up, and it sounded relatively close to where my doe should be laying.

From the time I shot the second doe (the one that ran into the timber) till I found her was probably no more than 30 minutes. Sure enough, the coyotes had found her and had her stomach ripped open and had eaten a good bit on one hind quarter. There was snow on the ground and best I could tell, I would guess there were at least 3 of them. Amazing how much they had eaten in that short amount of time.

From: DRR324
21-Aug-17

DRR324's embedded Photo
DRR324's embedded Photo
My 2010 MI state land buck, left overnight unfortunately.... Actually found him from the racket a bunch of crows were making. River bottom swamp area.

From: Bake
21-Aug-17

Bake's embedded Photo
Bake's embedded Photo
I shot this doe in 2009. Immediately could tell the hit was poor. Saw her bed down in a grass clump, backed out to come get her in the morning, and this was all that was left

From: LKH
21-Aug-17
Camping out to hear coyotes sing is not a new idea and it's just as good now as when it was first used. The problem is it's tough. Best choice is to dress very warm, get a partner and park a truck as close as you can get.

Sometimes they don't sing.

From: Glunt@work
21-Aug-17
I've had coyotes on a pronghorn we watched go down before we could get to it. They gorged themselves until we were about 40 yards and then bailed.

From: svrelk
22-Aug-17

svrelk's embedded Photo
svrelk's embedded Photo
Kill as many as you can before season starts... Killed 9 so far this month.. here's one with my son.

From: Pop-r
22-Aug-17
I hate them bastards! Kill all I can. Shot a doe several years ago right at dark. Was unsure of the hit and wasn't finding much blood. It was cold so I just waited til morning. Next morning found her about 100yds from shot ate. I mean ATE. Hooves & bones were all that was left. Really amazing. Idk how many it took to do it but there was not one ounce of meat left on the bones.

From: APauls
22-Aug-17
I remember reading that article in a magazine a number of years back. Great storytelling. I shot a nice buck in velvet a few years back and watched him drop in 40 yards. Before I was down from the tree there was 2 yotes on him. Tried sneaking in to kill them, but they were in the brush, and I couldn't see them so they got away. Drats!!!

I also lost literally half a buck to bald eagles one late November. Couple feet of snow and I shot it at 10:30am, came back at 3 and the back half was gone. Not a coyote track in the snow. Several baldies flew off when I got there.

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