3Rivers Archery Supply
Havalon edge
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
goelk 27-Aug-17
AlleninNM 27-Aug-17
Ucsdryder 27-Aug-17
HDE 27-Aug-17
LBshooter 27-Aug-17
jax2009r 27-Aug-17
Ucsdryder 27-Aug-17
Franklin 27-Aug-17
wyobullshooter 27-Aug-17
LBshooter 27-Aug-17
goelk 28-Aug-17
razorhead 28-Aug-17
ohiohunter 28-Aug-17
ben h 28-Aug-17
APauls 28-Aug-17
wyobullshooter 28-Aug-17
SixLomaz 28-Aug-17
ohiohunter 28-Aug-17
smarba 28-Aug-17
APauls 28-Aug-17
Surfbow 28-Aug-17
razorhead 28-Aug-17
wyobullshooter 28-Aug-17
Brotsky 28-Aug-17
ohiohunter 28-Aug-17
goelk 28-Aug-17
Matt 28-Aug-17
SixLomaz 28-Aug-17
SixLomaz 28-Aug-17
wild1 28-Aug-17
ohiohunter 28-Aug-17
ohiohunter 28-Aug-17
Medicinemann 28-Aug-17
From: goelk
27-Aug-17
Thinking of getting one for my birthday. How many blades do you use on a gutless method at one time on elk.

From: AlleninNM
27-Aug-17
I've done it with one. But I'd guess I usually go through 3. I carry six.

From: Ucsdryder
27-Aug-17
did my first one with 1. It was dull at the end and should have swapped it out to make life easier. Last took 3. I snapped one and then swapped out another toward the end. Did a deer in 1 with zero issues.

From: HDE
27-Aug-17
2 are plenty if you don't get to western with it.

From: LBshooter
27-Aug-17
Seems like a expensive way to cut things up, not to mention the safety issue with replacing and removing blades. My cold steel knives can cut up multiple animals before it even needs a touch up. What do the replacement blades run?

From: jax2009r
27-Aug-17
It cost 10bucks for a dozen blades they are the sharpest on the market

From: Ucsdryder
27-Aug-17
How much do your cold steel knives cost? How much does a sharpener cost? My havalon set me black 40 bucks and came with 24 blades. And it weighs a few ounces. You can find a dozen blades for 6 bucks if you look around

From: Franklin
27-Aug-17
They are nothing more than a scalpel handle with a #70 blade on it. You can get from any Taxidermy website or catalog. We use so many of these as they are considered "one and done" blades. Use it for surgical applications...otherwise we use knives.

27-Aug-17
I know lots of people swear by them, but I'll never use one on an elk again. First one I tried it on, the blade snapped 30 seconds into the process. I use it on fish and grouse, but when it comes to elk...no thanks.

From: LBshooter
27-Aug-17
Well I have two master hunters and a ultimate Hunter folder. Got on master Hunter for 25 bucks, the other carbon V I paid 75 and the folder cost me two dozen aluminium arrows. I just can't see zipping through the chest cavity with a havolon. I gues weight is an issue if your packing in the backcountry but I would be alittle Leary of trying to switch out blades with bloody hands etc... I did see their new Titan knife with a standard blade and scapula, looks nice,just haven't seen it in person.

From: goelk
28-Aug-17
Thanks guys for your input

From: razorhead
28-Aug-17
I was not all that impressed.... to switch out blades you need a leatherman tool for safety reasons...... I broke a blade on a deer,,,, I also keep one around, grouse and trout, I guess I just like a solid knife........

anyone try the Outdoor edge?

From: ohiohunter
28-Aug-17
The 60a blades make the 60xt look like tin foil. Havalon originally made surgical equipment then they clinched the niche for knives. Though I'll probably always carry a regular knife there will always be a place for the havalon especially for elk and oryx.

The guys complaining about the broken blades were most likely using the original 60xt. If you do chose to buy one make sure it will accept the 60a blades. Funny thing, during my research I found out what the "a" means.... autopsy.

From: ben h
28-Aug-17
A friend of mine picked up the Outdoor Edge and we haven't used it on any animals yet, but in looking at it, the blades are much more robust and far easier to change. The Havlons now come with a little tool to make changing blades easier (I bet this was in response to the Edge). Last year we did a buffalo primarily with the Havlon's and it probably took 10 blades. We used buck knives to do anything that required prying of any kind. I don't think we broke any blades on the buffalo, just changed them as they became dull.

From: APauls
28-Aug-17
I've never had an issue changing blades. If you're snapping blades, you're not cutting right. I use a Havalon so that I don't have to pry.

28-Aug-17
"If you're snapping blades, you're not cutting right."

So now there's a wrong way to use a knife? Sorry, but if it's warm, flies and yellow jackets are swarming, and I have an 800lb animal down in some nasty hole, finesse ain't part of my repertoire. Like I said, I know many swear by them, but for elk, I prefer a stout fixed blade.

From: SixLomaz
28-Aug-17
This is the story of two best friends that went elk hunting in early season. They conquered the butchering task in no time despite the warm weather and swarms of insects flying around. Their names are Havalon and Thermacell. The end.

From: ohiohunter
28-Aug-17
WYo, get the 60a blades.

From: smarba
28-Aug-17
Good one SixLomaz! Although for the record I've never used a Thermocell.

I've butchered dozens and dozens of animals from javelina to big bull elk and Havalon (agree 60a blades way better) make short work of the job. Smaller animals 1-2 blades, big bull elk 1-4 blades all depending on variety of factors. At 30-cents per blade it's cheap. I don't need to argue that you have to use a Havalon. Haul a big chunk of steel and a sharpening stone into the woods I could care less.

But for me it's the absolute perfect knife for all my butchering needs.

One more thing you do not need a pliar tool to remove the blade safely. Havalon makes a light plastic removal tool and before that came out I would simply step on the blade to pinch it against a log, flex the blade tab and pull the handle off (i.e. your boot tread & the log act as a pliar). Easier to do than explain and 100% safe: never an issue. To reload a blade if the handle is gunked up just use same log to gently push the tip of the knife against rather than try with slippery fingers. Again easier to do than explain.

Carl

From: APauls
28-Aug-17
I hear you wyo, but if you're not using a Havalon I hope your other knife is sharp, and if you're rushing that much with a sharp knife that's a safety concern. Takes me about 30-45 min to break down an elk alone with a Havalon, and I don't shoot elk every year. I fail to see what is gained by rushing.

But to each their own, I don't care if you don't want to do it the way I do, I'm not saying it's the best.

On another note does a thermacell work for wasps?

From: Surfbow
28-Aug-17
"If you're snapping blades, you're not cutting right."

Yep...

From: razorhead
28-Aug-17
Ohio - did not know that about the blades I will check that out,,, mine was an original, and I got a bunch of blades,,,,,, I will also check that tool out.........

28-Aug-17
Dang, you guys sound like those mech BH advocates! lol!

Again, if Havalon's do the trick for you, then by all means use them. For elk, I'm not a fan. I use a Cabela's Alaskan Guide knife. I used it on 2 elk and a moose before it needed resharpening. It's now done 2 more elk this go-round and will make it through this season just fine. When it does need to be resharpened, I send it to Buck and they do it for free and send it back. As far as the safety aspect, doing the job without having to worry about my blade snapping and being safe is not mutually exclusive. I've processed well over 100 big game animals without so much as a nick, although now I've probably jinxed myself!

As far as the thermacell for yellow jackets? Don't know, but I'm considering packing a sawed off shotgun this year! ;-)

From: Brotsky
28-Aug-17
+1 for the 60A blades, you do not want 60XT.

From: ohiohunter
28-Aug-17
Those alaskan guide knives are hands down my favorite knives to date. I have a handful of'm. I never hunt without my crosslock and its even harder to leave the vanguard behind. Phenomenal blades, but the havalon saved my butt when I was half dead from heat trying to quarter my oryx.

From: goelk
28-Aug-17
The blades are 60A and I will tried it out along with my other other knive. Good luck guys.

From: Matt
28-Aug-17
I really like my Havalons. It has always been curious to me that people who handle broadheads worry about changing Havalon blades, I don't perceive any more risk in one than the other.

From: SixLomaz
28-Aug-17
Thermacell will keep at bay any flying insect and on occasion even the mighty annoying menopausal spouse.

From: SixLomaz
28-Aug-17

SixLomaz's Link
There is a model, Outdoor Edge Razor Pro Folding Knife, sold on Amazon, with a regular push button changeable blade and a non-changeable gutting blade. Both swinging out from the handle. Safe and easy to change the blade.

From: wild1
28-Aug-17
wyobullshooter x2

I own a Havalon and use it for caping or other delicate cutting, but I much prefer a 3-4inch fixed blade knife on almost everything else - certainly for hogs, bear and even deer and elk. Personal preference I suppose.

From: ohiohunter
28-Aug-17
After watching an outdoor edge sponsored show, outdoor edge will probably be the last knife I'd ever consider.

From: ohiohunter
28-Aug-17
I will add, cleaning a bladeless knife is so easy its almost fun.

From: Medicinemann
28-Aug-17
I just bought an Outdoor Edge Razor lite the other day. I used it to skin, gut, and cut up a Pronghorn. I used the Havalon to cape the animal. Both worked very well for the purposes for which I used them.

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