Summit Treestands
Looks like a coyote attack survivor
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
sdbowhunter 02-Sep-17
sdbowhunter 02-Sep-17
sdbowhunter 02-Sep-17
kentuckbowhnter 02-Sep-17
Errorhead 02-Sep-17
WV Mountaineer 02-Sep-17
pav 02-Sep-17
milnrick 02-Sep-17
Muskrat 02-Sep-17
Bowriter 02-Sep-17
t-roy 02-Sep-17
Candor 02-Sep-17
sdbowhunter 02-Sep-17
DConcrete 02-Sep-17
drycreek 02-Sep-17
DConcrete 02-Sep-17
Ken Taylor 02-Sep-17
pav 02-Sep-17
WV Mountaineer 02-Sep-17
Andrew M@Work 05-Sep-17
From: sdbowhunter
02-Sep-17

sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
Got some pictures which appears to be a doe who looks like she survived a attack by a coyote grabbing on to the hindquarters.

From: sdbowhunter
02-Sep-17

sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo

From: sdbowhunter
02-Sep-17

sdbowhunter's embedded Photo
sdbowhunter's embedded Photo

02-Sep-17
or some serious chaffing.

From: Errorhead
02-Sep-17
I hope she kicked him in the mouth!

02-Sep-17
I'd say she is dead meat. I hope she broke the jaw of her first attacker, so it starves

From: pav
02-Sep-17
Any chance what we're seeing is due to late fawning? If she was bred in early to mid January (which is not unusual)....the time frames would line up about right.

From: milnrick
02-Sep-17
I think PAV has the answer...

From: Muskrat
02-Sep-17
I put my money on a recently dropped fawn as the cause of the blood and hanging tissue.

From: Bowriter
02-Sep-17
I'm gonna say, she just fawned.

From: t-roy
02-Sep-17
That was my first thought too, pav, but in the closeup pic of her walking straight away, it looks more like a wound IMO.

From: Candor
02-Sep-17
Several years ago I saw a decent 10 point out west that had recently been attacked by a mountain lion. The lion had removed his tail and you could see claw marks down the back side of both hindquarters. They are tough critters.... Nature is harsh.

From: sdbowhunter
02-Sep-17
Our fawns are born in the beginning to middle of June up here. Have never seen any born at the end of July. It also looks like you can see the hide and fur is ripped and can see the fascia in it's string like material hanging down and ripped

From: DConcrete
02-Sep-17
I don't care for the amount of coyotes out there either.

But I do find it laughable that if it's a coyote trying to get its meal vs hunters, everyone wants the coyote to get kicked in the mouth and starve to death. But if the deer were shot, it'd be all groovy.

Think about this for a moment. Please

From: drycreek
02-Sep-17
Ok, I'll think about it.............................................I thought about it, and I say let the coyote eat damn rats, I'll eat the deer.

From: DConcrete
02-Sep-17
Hope you can convince all the coyotes.

From: Ken Taylor
02-Sep-17
A few years ago I helped a friend butcher a moose that had narrowly escaped wolves - it looked very similar but on a larger scale of course.

From: pav
02-Sep-17
Most of our fawns are born late May to mid June as well....which coincides with the November rut dates. That said, breeding activity will continue well into the winter if individual does have not yet conceived. I once witnessed a buck breeding a doe on Valentines Day. Late breeding happens every year....resulting in a few late fawns.

02-Sep-17
No one is trying to convince the coyotes of anything. They do their thing. We do our thing by shooting them. Deer do their thing by fighting back sometimes. It's nature and it's natural. No need to think about anything anymore than that.

05-Sep-17
I'm with DConcrete. And I might be the only Bowsiter who doesn't hate and shoot every coyote I see.

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