Mathews Inc.
Mechanical release torque
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Bucket list 26-Sep-17
sundowner 26-Sep-17
Bucket list 26-Sep-17
Windwalker 26-Sep-17
Bucket list 26-Sep-17
deerhunter72 26-Sep-17
TD 27-Sep-17
Dino 27-Sep-17
Mark Watkins 27-Sep-17
x-man 27-Sep-17
From: Bucket list
26-Sep-17
I was target practicing and doing better then ever but I just noticed something I did not like; by the way ; I have never been satisfied with my shooting. What I noticed is that I was pulling my release with my hand not my wrist. When I pull with my wrist I get a much, much better group. When I try to pull with wrist, I have a hard time holding my anchor . It seems like my release is too long. Will appreciate any advice.

From: sundowner
26-Sep-17
Your release should be adjusted so that your trigger finger engages the trigger at the first knuckle in similar fashion as you would fire a rifle or shotgun.

You may wish to use the hand to help pull the bowstring, but once at anchor the weight of the bow should be only on the wrist strap, with the fingers relaxed. Once you get to anchor, move the trigger (index) finger to the front of the trigger and "load" the trigger. Do not remove your trigger (index) finger from the trigger, but begin squeezing as you aim. Then simply squeeze the trigger until the release activates and the shot is fired. A "surprise" release is always best, because your "bow hand" cannot react quickly enough to torque the bow and throw the shot off target.

BTW, a lot of archers anchor with the index knuckle under the ear lobe, and the tip of the nose just touching the bowstring. This way you have two points of contact, which helps with consistency. Executing each shot....stance, draw, and anchor.....as nearly the same as possible will promote accuracy.

Hope that helps.

From: Bucket list
26-Sep-17
I am certain your advice will get me over the hump. I am a very stubburn old man and I will keep on practicing until I hit what I aim at everytime. I sincerely thank you for the help.

From: Windwalker
26-Sep-17
I have a thumb (handheld) release that also has a wrist strap. I pull with equal pressure between my hand and wrist. If I pull with just my hand my elbow starts to hurt. Never had a problem with bow torque either with pulling with just my hand or my wrist. Bow torque mostly comes from improper bow hand pressure. One thing I've learned from shooting bows for over 50 years is that whatever works for you is the right way to shoot a bow. Good luck this fall.

From: Bucket list
26-Sep-17
Sir, everytime I have asked for help I find it amazing at the the response I receive. Everytime somebody answers I learn that there are good people out there. I also learn that regardless of age , an old dog can learn new tricks. I will use all you fellow advice and hopefully become a better archer.

From: deerhunter72
26-Sep-17
I've always shot a thumb release. A lot of people find that they get tighter groups with these releases. Recently picked up a Stanislawski SX3 and it the best I've used. Very adjustable and even has a trainer lock that allows you to draw your bow and squeeze the trigger without firing. Stan and Carter make some of the best releases available. They are a bit pricey, but if they work for you they are worth it.

From: TD
27-Sep-17
If actually torquing the bow at the shot, that's a grip thing. If your anchor is changing, that will cause your grip to change and torque the grip. Do some research on the proper hand placement and "feel". It's a critical subject.

I'm going to go out on a limb and say what could be the issue is your draw length is too long. Shorten it and square up your stance and shoulders more, a shorter draw is a better hunting draw anyway. Doesn't take much at the outer edge of draw length to change things up. Inconsistent shooting from session to session is an indicator. As far as your release..... trigger should be in your second knuckle, not your first, unless you're a fan of punching the trigger. Not at all like shooting a rifle. The action of "pulling" through the shot with your back "tension" should set off the trigger

The release itself can torque the string if you are not shooting off a string loop. If off a loop it's not an issue.

From: Dino
27-Sep-17
Drop the wrist strap, get yourself a hinge release or better yet, buy a combo tension activated release and a thumb release. You will not regret it.

From: Mark Watkins
27-Sep-17
Sundowner X 10...spot on advice!

Mark

From: x-man
27-Sep-17
Trigger should be at the second knuckle closer to your hand than fingertip. My wrist strap release doesn't extend more than an inch past my palm when I stand at rest with my hands down at my side.

I hunt with a thumb release now, but I still use a wrist strap for target.

I agree that your draw length is likely too long as well.

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