Moultrie Products
Bow for 5-6 year old
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
dmann 01-Oct-17
Trial153 01-Oct-17
LBshooter 01-Oct-17
razorhead 01-Oct-17
LINK 01-Oct-17
BigOk 01-Oct-17
elvspec 02-Oct-17
Vids 02-Oct-17
stringgunner 02-Oct-17
LINK 02-Oct-17
x-man 02-Oct-17
dmann 02-Oct-17
Vids 02-Oct-17
GF 02-Oct-17
GF 02-Oct-17
LINK 03-Oct-17
Vids 03-Oct-17
LINK 03-Oct-17
GF 03-Oct-17
From: dmann
01-Oct-17
Possibly getting bows for my kids this year, looking for recommendations. I think I've narrowed it down to the diamond atomic or genesis mini. But I'm also thinking I shouldn't spend that much on their first ones, in case they don't like it. Any suggestions? Keep in mind buying two , one for my son, one for my daughter, who is a year older and taller/ longer draw.

From: Trial153
01-Oct-17
New Breed Spawn

From: LBshooter
01-Oct-17
For a five year old, go out and buy the little bear recurve cabelas has. Easy to pull and will be perfect to introduce them to archery. 50 a bow roughly and they work well.

From: razorhead
01-Oct-17
Black Rhino recurves, long bows, down to like a few pounds,,,, check em out

From: LINK
01-Oct-17

LINK's Link
A year ago a bought my 6 year old daughter a Hoyt Ruckus. It has served her well but my 5 year old is a smaller weaker kid. For her 6th birthday I'm getting a bear cruzer lite. They are light yet have a lot of room to grow. I've seen them new on eBay in the 200-220$ range fully outfitted. 5-45# and 12-27 draw length. I think as long as you leave the quiver off a 5 year old could handle it fine.

From: BigOk
01-Oct-17
X2 LBshooter. Work great for my daughter starting out at 5.

From: elvspec
02-Oct-17
I tend to agree with starting on a recurve as that's what I started out with and I think it develops some instinctual shooting skills that just can't be acquired using a compound. But most kids these days want a compound. So I bought a Bear Cruzer Lite for my daughter and can't say enough good things about it as a starter compound. Its extremely light, extremely and easily adjustable in both draw length and weight. Comes turn key with a usable quiver and sight. My only real complaint was the peep it comes with is worthless. I had my local tech tie in a new peep and make a few adjustments and we were good too go. With the adjustment range you may not have to buy them a new bow until they are twelve or so. Plus the price is right. I picked up one online for somewhere around $160.00 http://www.beararchery.com/bows/compound/cruzer-lite

From: Vids
02-Oct-17
I also agree with LBshooter. I have a couple of the Bear longbows. They are cheap and the kids love them. I don't see any need to complicate it with a compound when they first start out. Just let them fling some arrows and have fun, they'll let you know when it's time to move up to something bigger.

From: stringgunner
02-Oct-17
We have 4 kids between 8-5. All have recurves, same kind as mentioned above except my oldest has a bit bigger recurve. He has been shooting one since 5. He loves it. We still work on practising consistent form with him and this year he is beginning to get accurate. I just focus on them all having fun while shooting for now. I think a compound would have been to complicated and perhaps taken some fun out of it for them. If it's frustrating my kids won't stick with it on their own.

Just my experience....

From: LINK
02-Oct-17
Vids my oldest is now barely 8 and after shooting her bow for a year and a half is over the legal minimum poundage. She will kill a deer this year I have no doubt. If she had been shooting a toy for the past year she would still be pulling 15#s. I see people giving their kids or wives a crossbow and that's fine. If they were shooting an adjustable compound bow from the beginning and working towards a goal they would get there a lot sooner. I've got a brother in law that is a weight lifter and his arms are massive, yet he can't draw my bow at 70#s. Shooting muscles need trained and developed. Why wait until they are ten and then by them another bow when you can by 1 bow to begin with? It's not for everyone but it's how I see it.

From: x-man
02-Oct-17
That young, I would start with the Genesis. It pulls and acts like a recurve, but still looks like a compound. Best part is, you can re-sell them without much of a loss. Genesis bows hold their value more than any other compound bow on the market.

From: dmann
02-Oct-17
Thanks for all the suggestions guys

From: Vids
02-Oct-17
LINK - Kids progress at different rates. My oldest is 7 and she can't pull back our Hoyt Ruckus at the minimum weight setting, so she's not ready. Both girls (7 and 5) are eager to use it, just not strong enough yet. As soon as they can pull it back and control it we will switch over. They're having fun and interested in continuing to shoot (oldest took an archery lesson and loved it, the younger was jealous) so I'll let them progress at the rate that works for them. My dad didn't take me hunting until I was about 12 and here I am, so I'm not in any rush.

That's great if your daughter is ready to hunt at 8, but my kids aren't going to be ready then. I hope you guys have a blast.

From: GF
02-Oct-17

GF's embedded Photo
My younger son's Black Rhino ML 48-L at 5 yrs old
GF's embedded Photo
My younger son's Black Rhino ML 48-L at 5 yrs old
GF's embedded Photo
Same boy, same bow, 6 years later
GF's embedded Photo
Same boy, same bow, 6 years later
GF's embedded Photo
Shoots better than the Old Man - and this was with a half-dozen people watching!
GF's embedded Photo
Shoots better than the Old Man - and this was with a half-dozen people watching!
GF's embedded Photo
His big brother likes to shoot, too; he got his own recurve for Christmas - #42@28", which he handles well now and will never outgrow entirely, but he likes this LB of mine, too...
GF's embedded Photo
His big brother likes to shoot, too; he got his own recurve for Christmas - #42@28", which he handles well now and will never outgrow entirely, but he likes this LB of mine, too...

From: GF
02-Oct-17
So that can be the beauty of a stickbow - self-adjusting for draw weight and DL. That last pic is my 14-year old; he's not exactly a big dude, at 4'6", but he's a stud (takes after his mom's side of the family - LOL). And yeah, he was about 4' 6" when I took that pic, but he's 14, so he's gained a couple inches since Spring.

Anybody wanna tell me he's not at full draw? That bow is #55@28"...

From: LINK
03-Oct-17

LINK's embedded Photo
My eight year old with her Ruckus.
LINK's embedded Photo
My eight year old with her Ruckus.
Vids, I get it that kids are all different. My oldest was born with well defined biceps and thighs. My middle daughter is weak and at almost 6 she is sharing clothes with my 3 year old that is built more like my oldest. The minimum 15# draw of the Ruckus is why I wouldn't recommend it for a 5-6 year old. The cruzer lite however goes down to 5#, my middle daughter can handle the mass weight and 5# draw and she's as about as weak as they come. I know the wallmart bows serve a purpose and that's what my oldest used at 4-5, but when I throw out a bow not knowing the kids of the adults reading here, I'm going to give one I feel most 5-6 year olds can use for more than a year or two and have the option of using for hunting as soon as they get to that point. Like I said I know it's not for everyone but those looking to by a bow that will grow with their kids(most will) but one they can hunt with too, take a look at the cruzer lite.

From: Vids
03-Oct-17
Yeah, kids grow at different rates for sure, your daughter is twice the size of mine! LOL My kids are all on the small side, most people in my family are behind on the growth charts when young.

I can see the logic in what you're saying if the child is showing a very strong interest in archery from the start. Mine started lukewarm but are remaining interested, so a $30 purchase at the start made more sense than $300. Both ways could work, depending on the child involved and your financial situation.

From: LINK
03-Oct-17
I agree. I'm lucky my girls have always had interest in the things I do. My oldest has been asking for the past 4 years when she can go elk hunting. We will see pretty soon how serious she is about hunting. She's a farm kid and would sell the prize cow, chicken, cat for slaughter if the price were right but I'm anxious to see what she thinks when she's the one taking the life. She acts like she's all in. Regardless of the bow the important thing is to get them one, start the fire and keep throwing fuel on.

From: GF
03-Oct-17
Looks like some good coaching happening at your house, Link!

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