Sitka Mountain Gear
Killed One With CWD
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Bowriter 11-Oct-17
txhunter58 11-Oct-17
Bowriter 11-Oct-17
Jaquomo 11-Oct-17
smarba 11-Oct-17
EmbryOklahoma 11-Oct-17
txhunter58 11-Oct-17
Bowriter 11-Oct-17
Florida Mike 11-Oct-17
Highllainsdrifter 11-Oct-17
Jaquomo 11-Oct-17
stick n string 11-Oct-17
Pyrannah 11-Oct-17
craig@work 11-Oct-17
Ace 11-Oct-17
Bowriter 12-Oct-17
Jaquomo 12-Oct-17
IdyllwildArcher 12-Oct-17
txhunter58 12-Oct-17
txhunter58 12-Oct-17
Highllainsdrifter 12-Oct-17
Jaquomo 12-Oct-17
Jaquomo 12-Oct-17
txhunter58 12-Oct-17
Jaquomo 13-Oct-17
Bowriter 13-Oct-17
From: Bowriter
11-Oct-17
Killed one last night with CWD--couldn't wait to die. I told her three times, "Don't you dare turn broadside, don't do it. I can hit nails at 32-yards, don't turn broadside. She wouldn't listen. Went about 50-yards and fell where I could drive to within 100-yards. Field dress about 60 and butterball fat. Dry doe. In about two hours, she will be cut wrapped and in the freezer. Packed her full of ice bottles and she kept just fine lasternight, even at 68-degrees. Oh, also saw three bucks with potential and a flock of turkets and one large-style coyote. It was 82 with a light mist falling and I was in a natural ground blind made by a storm-downed tree. I won't hunt in a true rain, not fair to the game, but a light, warm misty/rain, especially after a long dry spell, gets them moving. When my yard deer started popping out, I hit the woods. I wish I had someone to take a picture of my attire. Shorts, T-shirt and moccasins, sitting on a lawn chair and completely concealed. And these deer, are not yard deer. They get pressure and normal spooky.

From: txhunter58
11-Oct-17
You are a smarter and braver man than I

From: Bowriter
11-Oct-17

Bowriter's embedded Photo
Bowriter's embedded Photo
How so, txhunter?

One hour, 45-minutes from hang up to in the freezer. Took me longer because I have a landowner who wants some hamburger, So, I took special pains trimming the chunks for ground meat.

Everything clean and now, a shower and knives sharpened for the next one. This is vac-pac #1 for 2017.

From: Jaquomo
11-Oct-17
My muley buck last year had "Couldn't Wait to Die" disease too. As he was coming I kept saying, "please don't get close enough" because I really wanted to hold off a little longer. So he walked past at 10 feet and I had to let him get out to 7 yards before I could turn and shoot.

Only difference is that I like to let the enzymes do their job for 9-10 days before packaging.

From: smarba
11-Oct-17
Bowriter I too was confused like txhunter and had to read several times until I understood. I recommend revising your post to capitalize "CWD-Couldn't Wait to Die" as I also thought you were referring to Chronic Wasting Disease in which case txhunter's comment was valid.

Carl

11-Oct-17
I kill a lot of pigs every year with CWD. Wish they would knock it off.

From: txhunter58
11-Oct-17
HAHAHA! Ya got me. I missed the anagrams meaning. Been having a CWD (Wasting disease) discussion with some guys on another forum and had that on my mind. You were very plain with your meaning, I just missed it!

Ok, I will say it. DUH! Guess I need my caffeine in the morning before responding to intelligent humorous posts.

From: Bowriter
11-Oct-17
LOL-Np harm done, at my age, I get confused easily.

From: Florida Mike
11-Oct-17
I missed your meaning also. I thought you meant Chronic Wasting Disease.

11-Oct-17
CWD means something entirely different out west. You don't want to eat meat that came from an animal with CWD as you would most likely die a slow horrible death. It's no joke

From: Jaquomo
11-Oct-17
Highlainsdrifter: WHAT???

I live in the core endemic area where CWD was first discovered. People have been eating infected deer and elk here and elsewhere for at least 60 years, likely much longer. The incidence of CJD-V (the human form of spongiform encephalophy) is lower in our county and the surrounding counties than the national average. There is absolutely no evidence of CWD making the jump to predators or humans, even though researchers have been trying to force the jump for over 50 years. Nobody I know even bothers to test anymore.

C'mon man.. I know it's the internet, but do some fact-checking before spouting nonsense.

BTW, we're all dying a slow death. Some have it more horrible than others (depending on how bad their marriage is...)

11-Oct-17
U mean CrazyWifeDisease, Lou?...

From: Pyrannah
11-Oct-17
Jaqx2

From: craig@work
11-Oct-17
Jaquomo +1 No evidence that it spreads to humans despite the media hysteria

From: Ace
11-Oct-17
I agree with Jaq and the others. That said, I'll refrain from eating the brains of an animal known to get any spongiform encephalopathy, actually I don't need to be eating any brain, period. One guy recently told me he loves deer brains. Pass thanks.

The meat I'll eat gladly.

From: Bowriter
12-Oct-17

Bowriter's embedded Photo
Bowriter's embedded Photo
"CWD means something entirely different out west. You don't want to eat meat that came from an animal with CWD as you would most likely die a slow horrible death. It's no joke"

Totally false. To date, no evidence whatsoever that CWD can jump a specie barrier. Also, no evidence it can be spread by eating the meat. I was a student at UW when it was discovered. It was found in some elk that came from CSU and they originally came from live-trapping in CO. Not a doubt in my mind, CWD has been in cervids since there have been cervids. I also believe, there is no such thing as a CWD-free state. If that state has cervidae, in all probability, in my opinion, they have CWD. It just has not been detected. To me the three greatest dangers in the spread of CWD are as follows: (1) Penned or contained cervidae. (2) Transport of live cervidae across state lines. (3) Baiting or supplemental feeding. Notice, I use the word Cervidae instead of deer. That is because CWD has been found in elk, moose and caribou-all cerivds or members of the deer family. Now. How big a threat is CWD to the wild deer population? It is exactly as big as it was 50-years ago and probably long before that. It is a miniscule threat if compared with EHD-Blue tongue. Many times more deer will die of EHD and vehicle collisions than from CWD. In some areas, it can be somewhat significant. In one area of WY, recently, deer tested showed 40% positive. But they did not say how many deer were tested. If they tested 10 and four had it, that is 40 %. But that is not the same as testing 1,000 and 400 had it. So, be careful what you read and believe. BUT..if you see a sick deer, I believe you should be allowed to kill it and not use a tag. However, you must immediately report it and you get to keep none of it. I got a call just about eight hours ago from one of my neighbors, saying he had a deer in backyard that appeared sick. I went to check and we could not find it. I was carrying my rifle and had full intention of shooting it if it did in fact, appear sick. IN many areas, the deer population today, is ripe for a major epidemic. Ma Nature has her own system. (Sorry, I'll get off my soapbox now.) But I know what the one yesterday died of.) CWD-Couldn't Wait to Die.

From: Jaquomo
12-Oct-17
They've found Chronic Wasting Disease in a herd of reindeer in Norway and now are trying to slaughter the entire herd of 2700 to try to eradicate it. Good luck. They already tried that with the muleys where I live before discovering the prions live in the soil and the plants.

They've also found it in South Korea. Some researchers now suspect it may not be caused by prions at all, but instead by a "super bacteria", and the prions (folded proteins) are a by-product.

I used to fish with the former manager of the C.S.U. deer pens where it was first identified. He believes those penned deer got it from nuzzling infected deer outside the pens. When I worked with a Wall Street Journal writer on an article about it, we interviewed old time ranchers in the core area who told us they've seen it in the wild deer since they were kids, and they're old men now. If it was truly dangerous to humans, we'd have a bunch of infected hunters and families all over the country.

I'm with Bowriter, and believe it's been around for a LOOONG time. The only difference is that now they test for it and wherever they test for it they seem to find it. Hmmm...

12-Oct-17
Nice shot.

From: txhunter58
12-Oct-17
"Totally false. To date, no evidence whatsoever that CWD can jump a specie barrier. Also, no evidence it can be spread by eating the meat"

Unfortunately that is no longer true. There is a study currently underway in Canada that has infected macaques (small monkeys) with CWD by eating muscle tissue! NOT neural tissue.

Everything else above is true: It has been around for decades and there has never been a single case of like disease in humans that can be traced to eating CWD meat. So, do I have any problem personally eating one: No. However, I would think twice about feeding it to my grandkids or to a person on chemo taking immunosuppressive drugs.

Here is a youtube video of a CWD conference. They talk about the research with the macaques at the 1 hour 31 minute mark.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/Vtt1kAVDhDQ

Here is a lively discussion on the subject as well:

http://www.monstermuleys.info/dcforum/DCForumID5/24542.html#22

From: txhunter58
12-Oct-17
I am firmly on the side the fence that believes that CWD in the US started at CSU when they were doing experiments with sheep with scrapie (another prion disease). There is just too much smoking gun evidence to not believe it. Not sure where it came from in other countries.

The really sad thing is that with scrapie, you can kill all the infected animals and you eliminate the disease. But when the prion mutated into deer, something changed and it is able to survive in the environment for years and still infect new deer. At CSU, they removed the topsoil in those pens, treated the ground with lime, then put new topsoil back and even after years, deer in those pens still come down with CWD

12-Oct-17
So some of you are telling me you would knowingly bring a CWD infected deer home for your wife and children to eat ? Wow, good for you but you should let your family members know the deer is infected. Me? I ain't touching or hunting an infected animal

From: Jaquomo
12-Oct-17
How do you know it is infected? Unless you test every one you'll never know. Most show no symptoms until the very end. And now that they've discovered CWD infected animals with no prions present, the current tests aren't foolproof. Considering the percentage of infection in wild populations, I'm quite sure my wife and children and neighbors and all my hunting friends and their families have all eaten infected deer at one time or another. None of us are drooling.

TXhunter, I used to be on that side too until doing the interviews with Livermore ranchers for the Wall Street Journal article, and also with the manager of the deer pens at the time. Old timers reported seeing CWD-like symptoms in dead and dying wild deer in the area for decades before the C.S.U. deer pens even existed. And it doesn't explain how it spread to Norway, South Korea, isolated areas in Canada, and throughout the U.S. What they do know is that wherever they test for it thoroughly, they find it.

From: Jaquomo
12-Oct-17
Txhunter, I wish I could attach a PDF. I have the results from the scientific team that did the monkey study, and what isnt being reported is that over a 10 year period they we're unable to induce CWD, either by oral feeding or brain innoculation, in even a single one of the cynomolgus macaques, which are much closer to humans than the other monkeys that did contract it. There is a significant gene sequence variation between the two that they suspect made the others susceptible. Their conclusions were that there is a significant intrapecies barrier between cervids and cynomolgus. Based upon this their conclusion also stated that the risk of transmission to humans is "extemely low".

But the alarmists are still freaking out. What's new? The chances of dying in a vehicle wreck enroute to hunting is a million times + greater than contracting CWD, even from injection of prions right into the brain.

If you'd like the paper I can email it.

From: txhunter58
12-Oct-17
Sure, send it, thanks! As a veterinarian, I am on the front lines of this thing in Texas. The first cases on a deer farm were diagnosed in an adjoining county. I have deer clients, but I always side with the natural resource.

And old timers seeing deer/elk show symptoms similar to CWD is not anything close to proof that what they were seeing was CWD. There are so many diseases that can mimic CWD, especially at the end. And there is so much data/history of the spread of CWD to suggest that this thing is spreading out from the CSU area

To repeat an old cliché: "it is much safer to eat CWD than to drive to work tomorrow" And that is a FACT. But the chances it might cross to humans at some point is not zero.

I will hate the day we get the first positive on my ranch (about 80 miles from where it is currently). At this point, I think our only hope to help in the future it that evolution throws up a genetic resistance. I

From: Jaquomo
13-Oct-17
Txhunter, pm me your email addy.

The fact that not every cervid that is continually exposed contracts it seems to indicate that there may be some natural resistance. We can hope. But there's no question that population concentration = higher infection rates, and some researchers now believe plants may carry the prions up from contaminated soil, where the prions can be ingested. If researchers determine that harvested plants carrying prions are being transported, i.e... hay or other crops from high incidence areas, all hell will break loose.

From: Bowriter
13-Oct-17
"So some of you are telling me you would knowingly bring a CWD infected deer home for your wife and children to eat ? Wow, good for you but you should let your family members know the deer is infected. Me? I ain't touching or hunting an infected animal"

Nor am I. I am not going to eat deer that appears sick, But there is only one way to know if a deer has CWD and that is through a brain exam. But one would be fairley stupid to eat any deer that is obviously sick. Again, I am sure going to shoot and try to kill an obviously sick deer and I shall immediately notify the right folks. This applies to in or out of season, any size or sex. If I were to get arrested, we would have a nice time in court.

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