shanked by fellow bowsiters
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
Jethro 13-Nov-17
midwest 13-Nov-17
ki-ke 13-Nov-17
stick n string 13-Nov-17
Mr.C 13-Nov-17
Vids 13-Nov-17
midwest 13-Nov-17
rodb 13-Nov-17
rodb 13-Nov-17
stick n string 13-Nov-17
IdyllwildArcher 13-Nov-17
Surfbow 13-Nov-17
IdyllwildArcher 13-Nov-17
tobywon 13-Nov-17
Vids 13-Nov-17
Ace 13-Nov-17
IdyllwildArcher 13-Nov-17
craig@work 14-Nov-17
BTM 14-Nov-17
Jethro 14-Nov-17
Rut Nut 14-Nov-17
Grubby 14-Nov-17
BACKYARD 14-Nov-17
ELKMAN 14-Nov-17
From: Jethro
13-Nov-17
Over the years there has been a few threads on slow cooking shanks. I just wanted to thank all of you that suggested that. After 30 years of using shank meat for burger, yesterday tried braising them. Veggies, wine, stock, 4 hours in the oven, they turned out melt in your mouth great. The whole household enjoyed 2nds. For those of you that haven't tried it, you won't regret it.

From: midwest
13-Nov-17

midwest's embedded Photo
midwest's embedded Photo
Don't grind the shanks!!!

Shank you....shank you very much!

From: ki-ke
13-Nov-17
Keep talking.......you've got an Osso Buco aficionado here....last name notwithstanding....

Please detail recipe..Midwest?

13-Nov-17
I'm so glad that this thread came up. Based on all of the threads the past year on both site about them, I bought hank Shaws buck buck moose book based on a couple of the recipes people said were in there but primarily I have been excited to try to do the shanks. They always go into my burger and I'm really picky about my burger, I try to keep as much silver skin as possible out of it and the shanks are a nightmare to try to clean up. So I'm super excited to try A recipe that I can just cook them as they are.

I killed three deer in a span of eight days and I kept front and back shanks from one deer and ground the second dears. The deer I killed on Saturday I have yet to butcher so I'm planning to freeze the shanks. My question is, do you have to clean any of the silver skin off of them at all or do you just cut them off and cook them as is. I know that I had read that whenever you come down that low in that slow that all of that stuff turns into like a July tennis, not tough and actually tasty part of the dish. Is this true? Or is it best to try to clean the easiest of the silver skin out of that? I myself am not super picky, but my wife and my daughters don't always go into things with an open mind and I want to make sure that I give it the best chance to be a Success at our dinner table. Thanks for bringing this up Jethro!!!

From: Mr.C
13-Nov-17
shanks for the tips hahahaha

From: Vids
13-Nov-17
I've made Osso Bucco a couple of times, it is fantastic. No more grinding shanks for me.

stink n string - I just cut away the outer layer of silver skin enough so anything that got dirt on it is gone. I wouldn't bother trying to take much more than that, there are so many layers of silver skin and tendon as you break down the shank it doesn't do any good to spend time on it. Cook it long enough and all that stuff breaks down anyways.

Speaking to how your wife and kids would like it - I tried one of Hank Shaw's recipes when we had a party with several other families. Everyone, including the kids went back for seconds.

From: midwest
13-Nov-17

midwest's Link
Don't clean any of that stuff off. Lots of recipes out there. Here's a few at my link. I love the garlic recipe! I mostly do my own now and use what I have at the time.

From: rodb
13-Nov-17

From: rodb
13-Nov-17
Sorry but mine is going in the sausage.

13-Nov-17
Ok, all the recipes i see call to cut the bone and leave shank attached. I cut mine off the bone on the first one, is that a big deal?

13-Nov-17

IdyllwildArcher's embedded Photo
IdyllwildArcher's embedded Photo
It really is one of the best cuts. I’m making an elk shank for the family tomorrow. When we were breaking down Mike’s elk, I asked him for them to which he genorously accepted (muahahah that fool!). The only downside is that I had to order a 24 inch roasting pan to accommodate them. Mike, if you make it out to cali wothin the next 4-6 months, I’ll make one for you.

Otherwise, a meal of deer shanks is a family favorite. Can’t wait to try the Mt goat shanks

From: Surfbow
13-Nov-17
"Sorry but mine is going in the sausage."

You don't know what you're missing man! Some folks think tenderloin is the tastiest part of an animal too, their loss...

13-Nov-17
I used to grind mine too. What a waste. Slow cooking them is the only way to go.

From: tobywon
13-Nov-17
Gonna try the pressure cooker on one this year if I am lucky enough to connect. Also interested if I should debone or keep on the bone.

From: Vids
13-Nov-17
Keep on the bone. Freeze it, then cut into 2" pieces with a saw before you thaw it to cook. You want the marrow from inside the bone when it's cooking.

midwest - I need to try the garlic recipe, looks good. The Austrian recipe is what I made and our guests destroyed it.

From: Ace
13-Nov-17
"Osso Buco" literally means Bone with a Hole. Traditionally it is made with the shank bone intact. I have made it many times both with and without the bone and it's always good.

Mooso Buco has become one of my all time favorite game dishes. I always start with braising the meat in olive oil. Lots of garlic and onions are a given as well. After that you can get creative, I have used white wine, red wine, red sauce and various combinations to make the sauce, usually mixed with a decent amount of beef stock (I use one called "Better than Bullion"). Other things to add or think about include soy sauce or teriyaki, thyme, ground black pepper, (if you're adventuresome, a bit of malt or balsamic vinegar adds an interesting flavor).

After braising, the key is to cook it low and slow, with lots of moisture. All of the connective tissue breaks down and creates the awesome flavor. Toby mentioned pressure cooking and that works great. I have done in 45 minutes in a pressure cooker what normally takes at least 4 hours in a slow cooker.

Usually. after it's cooked, I remove the meat and turn up the heat to boil off water and thicken the gravy. You can also use corn starch, especially if you're in a hurry. Since this also concentrates the flavor, don't use too much salt early in the process or you may find it too salty (you can always add more just before serving).

You can serve it over rice, risotto, pasta etc. Sometimes I add carrots and parsnips and sort of make a stew. By the way, leave all the connective tissue, on, as it cooks it will soften, and it definitely adds to the unique taste.

Breville makes this great appliance called a Fast Slow Cooker, it braises, slow cooks, steams and pressure cooks, works really well for one pot meals.

Try it, it's not a hard dish to master and I have never met anyone who doesn't like it. Dammit now I'm hungry.

13-Nov-17
Pressure cooker will work great. Absolutely keep them on the bone. It adds to the flavor and tenderness and there is a certain carnal pleasure of eating meat off the bone that can only be satisfied by doing it.

From: craig@work
14-Nov-17
How do you guys that keep it on the bone avoid getting bone dust etc on the meat? I've enjoyed the off the bone version after reading about it here....

From: BTM
14-Nov-17
"I used to grind mine too. What a waste. Slow cooking them is the only way to go." +1

From: Jethro
14-Nov-17
I cooked mine whole, on the bone. 4 hours @ 275. 1/2 way through I added the little red skinned potatoes. Next time I'll try cutting into bone in chunks for a true osso bucco. These were whitetail shanks from front, so 2 fit nicely in a roasting pan.

StickNString: I did not remove any silver skin. Everything that has been said about all the skin, tendons, ligaments melting away is true. As you pull apart the meat you can tell where those layers were, but they are melted away to jelly.

Craig@work: slice through meat with knife to the bone. Cut bone with bone saw of your choice. Rinse off to get rid of bone dust. Pat dry before meal prep.

From: Rut Nut
14-Nov-17
Am I the only one that thought the title of this thread meant something completely different???!!! ;-)

From: Grubby
14-Nov-17
I’ve saved all mine this year, I’ll be trying it in the near future. One other thing I’ve been doing differently as of late is the neck. Especially on a big buck, instead of grinding I just cut it into a couple of roasts and crockpot it. It’s amazing. Much better than the roasts from the hind quarter in my mind.

From: BACKYARD
14-Nov-17
Shank it up baby

From: ELKMAN
14-Nov-17
I need to try this.

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