Moultrie Products
2017 Kansas hunt story
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Bryan 16-Nov-17
Bryan 16-Nov-17
Bryan 16-Nov-17
Bryan 16-Nov-17
KC 16-Nov-17
BIG BEAR 16-Nov-17
kylesredapple 16-Nov-17
Bryan 16-Nov-17
BigOk 16-Nov-17
Pyrannah 16-Nov-17
jdee 16-Nov-17
KSMike 16-Nov-17
Earltex 16-Nov-17
z hunter 17-Nov-17
Nolski 17-Nov-17
Poacher hater 17-Nov-17
Poacher hater 17-Nov-17
Rancher 17-Nov-17
shawnm 17-Nov-17
Pyrannah 17-Nov-17
Pigsticker 17-Nov-17
writer 17-Nov-17
TD 17-Nov-17
Bryan 27-Nov-17
From: Bryan
16-Nov-17

Bryan's embedded Photo
my first buck
Bryan's embedded Photo
my first buck
I just got back home from my 11 day Kansas bow hunting trip with my dad. This was my third year archery hunting, and I figured I'd share my story with everyone.

We had some close calls and saw some nice deer, but to make a long story short, on Night 3 I was able to connect on a decent 9 point buck (had a g2 broken off). Fortunately and Unfortunately, I got to watch him for 20 minutes follow a doe around, make a scrape, and slowly make his way to me up a draw. This got my blood pumping and I got buck fever- which typically doesn't affect me til after the shot, but I was excited! He would be my largest bow kill yet. Once he got to 25 yards, he turned perfectly broadside, I drew my bow, and as soon as I released I knew I messed up. I pulled the shot, and I watched my arrow go directly into his liver. I immediately felt sick to my stomach. I watched him run a hundred yards, stop, and I thought he would lay down in the tall CRP grass. I could see blood running down his side, and I thought he'd be easily recoverable even though I made a less than desirable shot. Unfortunately, a doe ran up to him, bumped him, and he took off over a hill- and my heart sank even more.

After 20 minutes I climbed out of my stand and started marking blood because it was getting dark. I knew I wouldn't bump him immediately because of how far he went. We followed a blood trail over an hour and a half for a quarter mile before my dad and I lost the trail. We had to stop and resume in the morning. I hardly slept. First light found us in the field picking up the blood trail. We were able to follow it another 200 yards before we lost it in tumbleweeds and then short CRP grass. We started making big circles trying to pick up blood for the next hour with no luck. Finally, I looked at aerial map on my phone, and saw a stock tank on border of public and private ground a half mile away, in the general direction the previous blood trail headed. So, my dad went to the fenceline to check it out while I continued looking for blood. 10 minutes later he called me, and said he could see the deer on private next to the stock tank. So, we called the sheriff, who called the landowner, and got us permission to retrieve the buck. Unfortunately, Coyotes got to him overnight, and there wasn't much left of him.

The sheriff took pity on me, and decided to give me a salvage tag for the deer. So, I didn't have to use my buck tag on him. I didn't even know this was a possibility, but I was grateful the sheriff decided to do this. I was able to salvage about 20 lbs of meat from the neck and front shoulders, and the antlers. I still felt guilty and awful, and even though he was my biggest bow kill yet, I wasn't excited in the least. The knot in my stomach remained, even though I had found my deer.

The following day my dad made a perfect shot on a mature doe, to ensure he would have some meat going home. luckily it was only 300 yards from the truck, and it was the easiest haul out I've ever done.

I had couple shots at does over the following couple days, but I had lost all confidence in myself. I knew I had pulled the shot, but still felt uncomfortable at flinging an arrow. So, I finally I broke out the shooting block and practiced. I was dead on at 20, 30, and 40. It proved I really did just pull the shot, and my bow hadn't gotten knocked around at some point. This made me somewhat more confident to take a shot again, that it truly was just nerves. Unfortunately, all deer movement stopped after that. We went 3 days with only seeing 1-2 deer a day (stand hunting and driving around glassing for deer). It made it very tough.

On the second to last day i shot a young buck at 14 yards. After not seeing a deer within range for 3 days, I needed meat to go home, and I held out for a more mature deer long enough. I made a perfect shot, and the knot in my stomach went away, and I was more excited about this deer than I was the larger one. I am glad i had the opportunity to shoot another deer and restore my confidence , and redeem myself (to myself). Unfortunately, my dad never got an opportunity at a buck during the latter half of our hunt. He was just happy he had shot the doe, and we got to spend time together.

What I learned: I need to practice shooting my bow with adrenaline going though my system; Its not the size of the deer that matters- its the story and feelings behind it; Time spent with my dad is well worth the money for out of state hunts every year; My dad is awful at packing his truck and food for us for 11 days.

Bets of luck to everyone else for the remainder of the season!

From: Bryan
16-Nov-17

Bryan's embedded Photo
My buck that was eaten by coyotes
Bryan's embedded Photo
My buck that was eaten by coyotes

From: Bryan
16-Nov-17

Bryan's embedded Photo
My dad with his Doe
Bryan's embedded Photo
My dad with his Doe

From: Bryan
16-Nov-17

Bryan's embedded Photo
My 6 point
Bryan's embedded Photo
My 6 point

From: KC
16-Nov-17
nice job. Those yotes are hungary out there

From: BIG BEAR
16-Nov-17
Congrats to you and your dad !! Great father/ son time !!

16-Nov-17
So you shot two bucks? Is that correct? That's like bonus hunting right there. What a story

From: Bryan
16-Nov-17
Yes, kylesredapple. I didn't know salvage tags were even a thing until he brought it up. I didn't prompt it or ask for it- and it felt weird getting one. But I am grateful he did to allow me to shoot a second buck for food. The deer/doe population there has dropped due to CWD, so I personally don't like removing does out of the herd at this point. This allowed me to bring meat home without removing a doe myself.

From: BigOk
16-Nov-17
Congrats

From: Pyrannah
16-Nov-17
Did you get it tested for cwd?

From: jdee
16-Nov-17
Is your dad Will Primos ? lol

Great hunt ! Gotta love whitetail hunting in the sunflower state.

From: KSMike
16-Nov-17
Wow, 2 young bucks on 1 tag! No wonder everyone wants to come to Kansas!!!

From: Earltex
16-Nov-17
Good story. Thanks for taking the time to share. Losing a deer to coyotes is tough. It happens. Happy to see it all ended on a positive note.

From: z hunter
17-Nov-17
Sheriff was wrong to issue a salvage tag. The kdwpt does not guarantee that a deer will be edible. Regardless, If it was diseased, infected, or left over night in 80 degree heat and spoils, you should not have been issued a salvage tag simply because you made a bad shot and coyotes beat you to the carcass.

From: Nolski
17-Nov-17
You say you needed meat yet you passed multiple does in order to shoot a second buck? Your a poacher plain and simple! Just because the deputy made a wrong call doesn't change that what you did was morally and ethically bankrupt! I pray that you never come back to Kansas as we have plenty of poachers with out you!

17-Nov-17
What a worthless ass hunter. You are a disgrace just like the rest of the poaxhers

17-Nov-17
What a worthless ass hunter. You are a disgrace just like the rest of the poachers. Please don't come back to kansas

From: Rancher
17-Nov-17
Good story,spending time in the woods with your dad is worth all the money it takes to do it.Memories that will never be replaced,and don't beat yourself up,over a bad shot.I quit hunting elk over a bad hit,for 9 years,now I can't draw a tag.

From: shawnm
17-Nov-17
Congrats on the buck,or bucks.. I've got quite the yote problem in my area to. They wander the streets in the middle of the day. I think it's also starting to affect my hunting as the deer I got on cam are all bolting and very skiddish. I missed one the other day. They do not get a pass in my area.. great bucks though and even better to spend quality time with the old man. Congrats all around!!

From: Pyrannah
17-Nov-17
Wow, some arrogant asses on this thread...

Congrats on your bucks, go get some more nxt year

From: Pigsticker
17-Nov-17
Congrats, pay no attention to azzholes comment big on the thread. You what the law allowed you to do. If Sheriff was wrong so be it. You hunted ethically and so freaking what you wanted to shoot a buck. Some of these people do not remember there first undertakings as nimrods and think that everyone should look through the same lens. I just spent three weeks hunting with two of my brothers and believe me the hunt was secondary to to the the time spent together. I lost a brother two years ago and I would love to spend a day with him. Rejoice in the hunt and the time spent with family.

From: writer
17-Nov-17
Glad you had a good hunt, Bryan. My dad’s been gone 20 years (he was only 66), so I’m envious. But next time, know that the law says if you kill the deer, you put your permit on it when you find it. Sheriff gave you bad advice, and an illegal salvage rag, so learn from it and do it right next time. Think about it, guys could shoot a deer, let it set a few days then ask for a salvage tag because coyotes got it. Some major poachers have tried such tactics. You might consider bringing our dad back for a spring turkey hunt. We’ve got plenty!

From: TD
17-Nov-17
Good grief...... must be the peak of the troll rut.......

From: Bryan
27-Nov-17
At risk of bringing this topic back to the top of the list, I am going to post my continued ongoing experience.

I got a call from a Kansas Parks and Wildlife officer this morning. It was a pleasant call, albeit under negative (for me) circumstances. After re-living the experience and my story, he confirmed the sheriff giving me a carcass salvage tag was in error, and I should have tagged the buck with my deer tag. I feel awful that this situation has occurred, and I feel rightfully guilty. Hopefully someone else can learn from my mistakes and errors.

Moral of the story- don't get a salvage tag. Tag your deer right away per usual, and look forward to next year.

Good luck to those of you still with tags, and have a happy holiday season.

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