Sitka Mountain Gear
Another boot question, Still need help
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
bdfrd24v 20-Nov-17
Scrappy 20-Nov-17
bdfrd24v 20-Nov-17
APauls 20-Nov-17
bdfrd24v 20-Nov-17
Franklin 20-Nov-17
Scrappy 20-Nov-17
Dwitt2n 20-Nov-17
bdfrd24v 20-Nov-17
Bowriter 20-Nov-17
air leak 20-Nov-17
rooster 20-Nov-17
DRR324 21-Nov-17
Buck Watcher 21-Nov-17
ground hunter 21-Nov-17
bdfrd24v 22-Nov-17
Surfbow 22-Nov-17
air leak 23-Nov-17
DartonJager 23-Nov-17
chasin wtails 23-Nov-17
From: bdfrd24v
20-Nov-17
Current Boots- Lacrosse Aerohead 3.5mm 3rd season Redwing, un-insulated leather boots.

My go to boot is the Aerohead. Super comfy and I can't complain but once we hit cooler weather I have a ton of issues. My feet sweat. I've tried everything, liner socks, spray antiperspirant, thin socks with toe warmers, just one pair of wool socks, you name it. Early its not an issue. My feet can sweat a little and it not a problem with the Aeroheads or just regular leather boots. Below 35 its a diffferent story.

So what is the sock secret? One pair, liners with wool socks? I can't seem to find the answer. I'm due for new boots too as my Aeroheads are really showing their wear. I'm thinking about a heavier pair for colder weather but maybe that will make feet sweating even worse? I did just re-read Pat's Aerhead review from a few years ago, but he just mentioned when his feet got cold, never a sweat issue. Maybe I should go to a more typical lace up hunting boot for serious cold weather. I do not wish to go the boot blanket route unless it is the only way to go.

Please any advice or comments from other people's success or struggles is greatly appreciated!

From: Scrappy
20-Nov-17
First are you taking care of the rest of your body. If your core is getting cold then there really isnt anything that will help. Now for the feet, i just wear a thin merino wool hiking sock and any comfortable uninsulated hiking shoe or boot, have even wore running shoes with temps in the teens. The secret is arctic shields with a chem warmer thrown in when I put them on in the stand. It really really is all that is needed.

From: bdfrd24v
20-Nov-17
Honestly the only thing that ever gets cold is my feet. I'm usually in my fanatic suit below 35, hands are toasty in the pouch pocket.

One additional thought would be sizing of boots...Perhaps I need bigger for better air circulation?

Honestly how much of a hassle is it with the boot blankets?

From: APauls
20-Nov-17
Big question is why are your feet getting cold? Are they wet from sweat? My feet sweat bad, and so any rubber boot is the worst option. I have a nice pair of lacrosse aeroheads, but nothing short of a fan and a heater in a rubber boot would keep them warm.

From: bdfrd24v
20-Nov-17
I would say 95% of the time my feet get cold from sweating first. I can't ever remember them being cold and NOT having wet socks.

From: Franklin
20-Nov-17
Depend what you talking about...stand sitting...spot and stalk...how far are you walking....terrain etc. My feet sweat heavily when spot and stalk...if you stop in cold weather your feet WILL get cold. Go to a Schnees type pack boot...they have different weights of liners and the liner makes it so much easier to get the boot dry. You can even have multiple liners for different occasions.

From: Scrappy
20-Nov-17
Not the boot blankets, arctic shields will fold up and fit in a cargo pocket.

From: Dwitt2n
20-Nov-17
Wool socks APPARENTLY are not all the same. I started using llama wool a few years back and it has seemed to help. A big part for me is not getting any sock sweaty going in. I have a few places that I hunt that I have to drive to - and I wear slippers in the vehicle & boot up when I get there. Changing mid day helps. If I'm wearing my Aero's (I love my Aero's too) and when the toes start to get cold - I slip a small hand-warmer into the toes. Helps quite a bit. For extended sit, my LaCrosse Ice Kings are nice, but at ~ 12 /13 pounds, they are for sitting only. i also have a pair of Icebreakers overboots that work well too especially using the small hand warmer in the toes. The only foolproof method I've found for warm toes is a couple weeks in Cozumel. But then, they don't have the change of seasons like back home..........

From: bdfrd24v
20-Nov-17
I'm definitely looking for a stand boot here. I'm willing to try artic shields or whatever, I was just hoping to get lucky and be ok with a boot only.

Dwitt2n I do think socks are a major issue too. Any cheaper "wool" socks aren't worth $.02 Instant feet sweat in those things.

From: Bowriter
20-Nov-17
One pair light, 100% silk or any good wicking sock. One pair, medium ot heavy, 100% merino wool. One disposable toe or hand warmer on each foot,-may have to lightly tape to keep in place. I put them on top the toe. Then, any quality boot. But for the warmer to work the best, the boot must be breathable. I hunted this morning at 19-degrees for four hours and I was wearing Nikes. Quite comfortable.

Now, if you are talking extreme cold, I suggest, (if you can afford them,), a pair Schnee pack boots with extra liners. Or the white, bunny boot if you are not going to be walking very far or hunting from a small platform.

From: air leak
20-Nov-17
I spray them with an unscented anti perspirant and allow to dry. Then dust with corn starch. This helps to cut down on the sweating.

From: rooster
20-Nov-17
My muck boots with boot blankets do the trick for me. If my feet sweat, I'll pull my boots off and let my stocking clad feet air out for a bit before putting my boots back on, then cover with the boot blankets.

From: DRR324
21-Nov-17
The issue is obviously sweat developing on your walk and then creeping cold while on stand. I spent 4 years as the footwear buyer at Jays Sporting Goods in Clare, MI, have a few different remedies that may help.

#1. If you boots are "large" enough, remove the foam liner from an old pair of sneakers and slip in under the current liner. Most cold creeps in from the bottom. Make sure you still have room to wiggle toes and let the blood flow to your feet.

#2. Have numerous pairs of liner socks and a few different weight (hikers, sedentary, etc) wool blend socks. Carry a dry pair of liners along with your thick wool in your pack while you hike to the stand wearing liners and hiker weight socks. Prior to your sit, switch over to a dry pair of liners and the thick blend.

#3. Invest in a boot dryer (if you haven't already). Wet knee boots are what ruins and wears most of them out prematurely. A lot of friction on the interior when jamming feet in and out of them. Wet liners tend to tear or stretch. Have to start the process with dry boots every time out. I have 3 dryers and have different boots on them pretty much all winter. Cost pennies to run, and every day I come home from work, boots go right on it.

#4. A bit more difficult, but if the above are still not cutting it.... Place a handwarmer pack right on the back side of your knees. Might have to tape in place, but blood flowing into your feet get an extra boost of warmth.

#5. Boot blankets work 100%.... but you have to start with dry feet to begin with!!

#6 Stick form antiperspirant on the bottom of your feet- allow to dry. A couple swipes, let dry and then liner socks. It will block the pores and reduce sweating. Hope someone finds this useful!

From: Buck Watcher
21-Nov-17
Things I have done/do to keep warm feet.

Unscented Speed stick on my feet to prevent sweating - biggest help. When I wore a pack boot(ie Sorel or Iceman - rubber/leather w/ wool liner) I left my boots in the truck overnight. I wore slip on boots until I was ready to walk away from the truck. Then I put on the cold pack boots. My feet were not on fire when I got to my stand. I gave up on pack boots since. Good antibacterial wool socks. Loose fitting boots. Now I wear 1200 or 2400 gram Thinsulate boots. Boot blankets with a hot pack if needed too.

21-Nov-17
I tore a pair of aeroheads up in 2 seasons, but I trap and hunt, pretty rough on a boot, no way are they tested for 4000 miles, maybe in Kansas..... I do what the suggestions above do, I put deodorant on my fee, and use powder inside my liner sock....

I hunt in a pretty cold area (UP),,,, if I am going to sit all day, my Mickey Mouse boots,,,, if I am going to cut country and walk, than my Cabelas Uplanders, 600 grams is plenty for me,,,,, do not want a heavy boot, when covering country....

I get too cold, I build a fire and make some tea

From: bdfrd24v
22-Nov-17
Well Amazon has a pair of boot blankets on its way for Friday delivery. I'll check them out Monday here in PA as rifle season opens up. I plan on taking the bow out but I do have a borderline 150" 8 point. I won't be too proud to take him with the rifle.

Question... I've heard a couple people mention powder. Any particular powder or just your typical cornstarch type body/baby powder.

Also do you all prefer stick over spray antiperspirant?

DR332R. Appreciate all the advice. Big user of the boot dryer. Game changer for sure.

From: Surfbow
22-Nov-17
Unless it's totally frigid out I'll take my boots off periodically throughout the day to let my feet dry a bit, even if they aren't feeling particularly sweaty or anything. If I'm doing a lot of hiking, I'll carry an extra pair of dry socks and switch them out about midday.

From: air leak
23-Nov-17
"Well Amazon has a pair of boot blankets on its way for Friday delivery. I'll check them out Monday here in PA as rifle season opens up. I plan on taking the bow out but I do have a borderline 150" 8 point. I won't be too proud to take him with the rifle. Question... I've heard a couple people mention powder. Any particular powder or just your typical cornstarch type body/baby powder.

Also do you all prefer stick over spray antiperspirant?

DR332R. Appreciate all the advice. Big user of the boot dryer. Game changer for sure."

I'll shower the night before and spray my feet with anti perspirant before I go to bed. When I leave for hunting, I'll wear a pair of cotton socks for the ride. When I get there, remove the socks, dry my feet with the truck heater, and dust them with plain corn starch.

This helps to cut down on the sweating.

From: DartonJager
23-Nov-17
I have both hunted and ice fished in sub-zero temps down to -18*/F (W/O wind chill) and NEVER get cold feet, hands yes but NEVER, EVER feet since going to either Boot Blankets or LaCross Iceman boots. When using either I wear my un-insulated 10" boots and change into my Iceman's or wear the BB's over them. If its a long walk I use the BB's short walk I use the Iceman's. But what others have said is exactly correct if the rest of your body gets cold feet don't matter. I've found that to stay warm in temps below 30* you must #1-Utterly neutralize the winds affects on you and #2-Have absolutely no areas wear heat can escape chief among those are your waist, head and hands. Do all that and you will laugh at the cold. My friends constantly are amazed at my ability to withstand the cold, but it really is the fact I dress correctly, by that I mean a base layer that REALLY DOES wick away moisture, absolutely NO COTTON at all, and most important of all if stand sitting under no cercumstances NEVER allow myself to even begin to sweat on the walk to my stand. Getting sweated up is the kiss of death in cold weather. This means I almost always wear minimal clothes out to my stand and finish dressing once on stand.

23-Nov-17
I don't know what kind of stand you are hunting from but if you on a metal ladder or hang on take a piece of carpet with you to stand on. The cold from the metal surely for me radiates up like you are standing on ice. I found a carpet square that had a 1/4" rubber backing that really helped me when it is cold.

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