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Does with fawns breed?
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Ty 27-Nov-17
Katahdin 27-Nov-17
Fulldraw1972 27-Nov-17
George D. Stout 27-Nov-17
Franzen 27-Nov-17
Charlie Rehor 27-Nov-17
drycreek 27-Nov-17
LKH 27-Nov-17
TD 27-Nov-17
wildan 27-Nov-17
Bowriter 28-Nov-17
Bowriter 28-Nov-17
PAbowhunter1064 28-Nov-17
Killbuck 28-Nov-17
APauls 28-Nov-17
TD 28-Nov-17
Zbone 28-Nov-17
RD 03-Dec-17
LKH 03-Dec-17
Scrappy 03-Dec-17
LKH 03-Dec-17
Mark Watkins 03-Dec-17
Ken 04-Dec-17
PA-R 04-Dec-17
The last savage 04-Dec-17
From: Ty
27-Nov-17
All of the does i am seeing still have fawns with them. Some of the fawns are still kinda little. Will the bucks breed a doe if she still has fawns with her?

From: Katahdin
27-Nov-17
They will breed the fawns too. Kinda like our congress

From: Fulldraw1972
27-Nov-17
I just read an interesting thing about bucks breeding does. A younger buck say a 1.5 year old will breed the doe then leave unlike an older buck that stays with them for a period of time like 24 hrs.

27-Nov-17
Does breed every year. Fawns need to reach sexual maturity to conceive....generally at 1 1/2 years old.

From: Franzen
27-Nov-17
I'm no expert, but I would think the bucks would breed anything that comes in, so yes. The few does I have seen lately have all had a fawn or two in tow. I'm guessing it doesn't take long for the groups to get back together after breeding. Then in a couple weeks or more the fawns might come in and get separated out. Cold will likely bring them all back together once again.

27-Nov-17
Does leave their fawns when they breed then reconnect right after. Does/fawns are fine apart for a while.

In the MIDWEST if a doe fawn reaches 80 pounds she could be bred but not until late December/early January.

From: drycreek
27-Nov-17
Charlie is right, it's less about age and more about weight for fawns to be bred. It's around 60 lb. on deer in Texas. I saw a 3.5 year old buck chasing a fawn on Saturday.

From: LKH
27-Nov-17
Does will leave the fawns, go on a walkabout till she finds a buck and breeds, then return to the fawns. We have so few deer where I hunt near Littlefork, MN that we can actually witness this occur.

From: TD
27-Nov-17
"Hey kid, here's $10..... go have fun at the carnival while me an' your mom have a talk...."

From: wildan
27-Nov-17
I think the does generally run the buck fawns off;the doe fawns will hang with mom and be close when she is bred.See a lot of fawns by themselves this time of year and most times it's a buck fawn if you get a good look at them.The displaced buck fawns move to a new area;nature's way.

From: Bowriter
28-Nov-17

Bowriter's embedded Photo
Bowriter's embedded Photo
Current year fawns, those over approx. seven months can and do breed. Approx. 25% will cycle, conceive and fawn, almost always a single fawn the first year. The deer in my backyard run slightly higher. I have about 30-32% of current year doe fawns breeding.

Now...as to the, "Will does breed with fawns by their side?" It depends on when the fawn was born. In other words, how old is the fawn and is it still actively nursing? As a general rule, does disperse fawns for a short period during their first cycle. Once the doe is bred or out of heat, they reunite. That explains why you see a lot of does and larger family groups together after the peak of the rut. It signals the older bucks that these does are not receptive. The younger bucks are too young to care. But, to somewhat answer the question, yes, a doe will breed with fawns by her side, just not if they fawns are still quite young. I have does getting bred as late as February or rarely, even March. That means, I can have does fawning in October. Those does miss the first cycle but may well breed on the second. Depending on food source and weather, I can have a small fourth breeding cycle. And BTW-to some extent- all fawns May be dispersed and in some cases, the doe fawns are dispersed farther. I have no idea just how this is determined. In addition, during dispersal, a buck fawn, may or may not stay away. In many cases, they return to the area in which they were fawned, after the rut. Yesterday, I saw an 8-month old, four-point actively pursuing a doe with youngish twins at her side. She did not seem to be totally uninterested. This is an interesting picture if you know the ages. Fascinating bachelor group and the dominant one is not the one you would expect.

From: Bowriter
28-Nov-17

Bowriter's embedded Photo
Bowriter's embedded Photo
The two does in the foreground are a mother daughter, the one in the back is a granddaughter, she is still spotted. It is quite possible, she will cycle this year. This picture was taken in August.

28-Nov-17
Bowriter....I can definitely see the family resemblance. ;-)

From: Killbuck
28-Nov-17
The buck I shot a couple years ago after it bred a doe in front of me had her 2 fawns standing 30 yards from her. Gotta learn somehow.

From: APauls
28-Nov-17
LKH I keep hearing people talk about low numbers of deer in Minnesota. I have come down there to fish the right a little fork. Fished the Rainy River last few years in a row and I am just amazed at how many deer you guys have. I see them everywhere! You need to keep driving north if you want to see low deer numbers! Maybe it's low compared to southern states or something I don't know but I seen a heckuva lotta deer down there.

From: TD
28-Nov-17
My understanding (at least with most mammals) is they normally won't come into estrus if still lactating? If so, the fawn(s) in question have been weaned, pretty close to being on it's own already?

Note: I don't think that rule applies to pigs, which I believe are actually born pregnant......

From: Zbone
28-Nov-17
Bucks will run fawns off if they are after mamma...

From: RD
03-Dec-17
shot a doe fawn thursday on a CWD hunt, she was in heat.

From: LKH
03-Dec-17
Because the land is so open around my house and the nearest neighbor about 1.5 crow miles away, I get to watch a lot of rut activity, especially now that season is over.

One thing I regularly observe is a big buck having a doe pinned down in the middle of a stubble field or pasture. They don't pay any attention to being 200 yards from a county road. The only thing they want to do is keep the doe off by herself. When she gets up and tries to run, he herds her until she stops and then they will graze or bed down again.

Dispersal, the buck fawns leaving the area, I believe doesn't happen until spring.

From: Scrappy
03-Dec-17
Dang I didn't know we had so many experts on bowsite. How in the world can a person get percents this and percents that on a wild deer herd?

From: LKH
03-Dec-17
Scrappy, the whitetail deer is one of the most researched wild creatures on the planet. Tons of money is spent hunting, raising, etc. this species and a lot of information is available.

Many of the accounts here are anecdotal, but supported by research.

Why don't you google some of the studies??? I know they aren't exact, but they often have some pretty good information. Then you too can be an expert.

From: Mark Watkins
03-Dec-17
Bowsiter,

Are your pics of deer in a zoo or a park?

Mark

From: Ken
04-Dec-17
Scrappy, I get all of my deer statistics at Applebees. :)

From: PA-R
04-Dec-17
I get mine at the coffee shop, crop yields, or when I used to hunt deer and kill lots of them, or, I have got three so far this year, or, BS, BS, IT NEVER STOPS, I just came in for a cup of coffee, OK. Peter.

04-Dec-17
Larry can I come to live and with you???? 1.5 miles to nearest neighbor,,,,jeeze,you must be in heaven!!!

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