Mathews Inc.
Neck roast
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Grubby 04-Dec-17
deaver25btb 04-Dec-17
LKH 04-Dec-17
Zbone 04-Dec-17
Woods Walker 04-Dec-17
Franklin 04-Dec-17
Grubby 05-Dec-17
Sage Buffalo 05-Dec-17
Nick Muche 05-Dec-17
tobywon 05-Dec-17
KJC 05-Dec-17
LBshooter 05-Dec-17
Woods Walker 05-Dec-17
APauls 05-Dec-17
Hackbow 05-Dec-17
brooktrout59 05-Dec-17
Woods Walker 05-Dec-17
ground hunter 05-Dec-17
brooktrout59 05-Dec-17
LKH 05-Dec-17
Hackbow 05-Dec-17
Sage Buffalo 05-Dec-17
Grubby 05-Dec-17
Woods Walker 05-Dec-17
LKH 05-Dec-17
Woods Walker 05-Dec-17
TrapperKayak 06-Dec-17
elk yinzer 06-Dec-17
Woods Walker 06-Dec-17
Lost Arra 06-Dec-17
PECO 06-Dec-17
South Farm 06-Dec-17
Woods Walker 06-Dec-17
Hackbow 06-Dec-17
Grubby 06-Dec-17
Fuzzy 06-Dec-17
South Farm 06-Dec-17
Joey Ward 06-Dec-17
Rut Nut 06-Dec-17
Fuzzy 06-Dec-17
From: Grubby
04-Dec-17
I always ground the neck for years, it was probably more work than it was worth. Today I cooked the neck in the crockpot 10 hours on low with onion soup mix. Phenomenal.

From: deaver25btb
04-Dec-17
Yup. I always save the neck of my bucks for a roast. Nothing better!!

From: LKH
04-Dec-17
Friend I'll call "Bill" killed a 2-3 year old bull elk. I was helping him cut it up and he wondered what to do with the neck. Apparently wife "Sue" wouldn't eat it.

I said I would bone it out, clean it up and tie it with cotton string. He could tell her it was a boneless rolled cross rib roast. We did it.

I was at their house for dinner and Sue was on her third helping, praising how good it was, and had a forkful about to enter her mouth when she asked Bill just where on the elk a boneless rolled cross rib roast came from. Bill never looked up and calmly said "right below the ears".

Sue's fork stopped, quivered for a few seconds and settled to her plate. She still hasn't been willing to eat a neck roast.

From: Zbone
04-Dec-17
Yep, neck go into the crock pot... I usually treat it like a roast with potatoes and spices...

From: Woods Walker
04-Dec-17
I recently butchered a small doe and had considered doing this with the neck rather than bone it for scrap. But there was a lot of fat in it (Illinois deer tend to have that problem!) and by time I started cutting it out all I had was a pile of scrap!

What do you do about the fat?

From: Franklin
04-Dec-17
Many people swear by this method for their necks....nothing better than gnawing on some neckbones. Cook with the fat in it and eat around it if you prefer.

From: Grubby
05-Dec-17
Don’t worry about the fat. The one I cooked last night was from a 200+ buck, I cut 2 big roasts out of it. No trimming necessary

From: Sage Buffalo
05-Dec-17
Bone-in neck roasts are one of my favorites!!!

From: Nick Muche
05-Dec-17
Neck roast in the insta pot (electric pressure cooker), done in 45 mins and as tender as if cooking all day in a crock pot. Very good!

From: tobywon
05-Dec-17
Yep, going to try one this year, haven't decided on crock pot or pressure cooker yet. Same goes for shanks. I just made a rolled stuffed roast from the rear quarter this weekend in the oven and everyone loved it, especially the kids. The older I get the better my cooking gets and the more different things I try. 30 years ago and I was mostly grinding up a deer for burgers and chili, totally different now. Love these threads by the way.

From: KJC
05-Dec-17
I "fillet" off both sides of the neck separately. Trim large sections of fat. Roll and tie and slow cook. Excellent with mashed potatoes and thick gravy.

From: LBshooter
05-Dec-17
Aren't there glands in the neck? If so, how many? Easy to pot?

From: Woods Walker
05-Dec-17
If it were from a big buck killed during the rut fat wouldn't be an issue because by then most bucks have run themselves lean. This young doe was literally obese. I mean to the point of making Rosie O'Donnell look like she was Ethiopian.

From: APauls
05-Dec-17
You're kidding me. It doesn't taste gamey or have that tallow?

From: Hackbow
05-Dec-17
I spent 30+ yrs slowly separating the meat from fat and connective tissue on deer neck, ribs and shanks. I didn't want to waste anything. Then I learned (probably from a thread here) that I can drastically reduce my butchering time, increase flavor and meat yield by throwing those cuts into the slow cooker. The neck may be my favorite part of the deer.

From: brooktrout59
05-Dec-17
Recently cooked neck of large Doe in crockpot with onion celery carrots red wine and water with McCormick's pot roast envelope. 8 hours later was easily one of best venison meals my family has ever enjoyed! And we eat a lot of venison.

From: Woods Walker
05-Dec-17
Was it full of fat when you cooked it? That's my question here. I don't doubt for a nano-second that the neck would be a great cut in a crockpot, but even loaded with fat?

05-Dec-17
we always had one on the pot in our camps,,,,, that is good eating

From: brooktrout59
05-Dec-17
Trimmed fat off outside only- put whole neck in- melted off bone like Lamb shanks. No fat evident after 8 hours in Crockpot. ABSOLUTELY delicious!

From: LKH
05-Dec-17
On big elk I keep the neck grind separate. Best tasting meat on the animal.

In AK we were able to buy large quantities of turkey necks. Roaster full with lots of spice, cook till the meat easily comes off the bone. Best meat on the turkey. As far as I'm concerned you can feed turkey breast to the dog.

From: Hackbow
05-Dec-17
WW - I cut only the biggest globs of fat from the neck if they even exist. Like brooktrout59 posted, the fat is not evident after cooking in crock pot. I had always been anti-deer fat, but slow cookers seem to make a huge difference.

From: Sage Buffalo
05-Dec-17
To be honest - most neck roasts don't have much fat on it. If it does it's on the outside and you can easily trim but rarely is there much fat there.

From: Grubby
05-Dec-17
I would definitely say it’s the best roast on the deer. And big.

From: Woods Walker
05-Dec-17
Thanks Hackbow. I will try that with the next deer I get. Cleaning up the outside a bit and then making a crockpot roast out of a neck sounds a WHOLE lot easier than boning and trimming it. Whenever I gut a deer I remove the windpipe up to the base of the head anyway (unless it's a deer that will be mounted), so that should make it even easier. THANKS!!!!

From: LKH
05-Dec-17
Will all the neck meat fans here, you will be surprised to know that in Montana and Wyoming (don't know about other states) you are not required to take the neck meat off an animal. On a big bull elk, that's 40# plus of what I consider to be wasted meat.

Only found it left in the field once and that was in Drywolf south of the Musselshell Trail in the Missouri Breaks.

From: Woods Walker
05-Dec-17
Sage: The one's in Illinois do! This one I just cut up had .25 cent sized hunks of fat on her neck and even under the first layer of muscle. I've killed does that actually had the beginnings of "marbling" in some of the muscle tissue. The bucks usually run it off by the beginning of November but not the does. Many times when you skin a doe there's literally a good 1/2" plus of pure fat along the spine from the hindquarters down to the ribs and you have to "skin" them twice.....or more accurately "fat" them!

From: TrapperKayak
06-Dec-17
All meat with fat and silverskin in it that is too tedious and time consuming to trim out, like the neck, goes into the crockpot for slow cooking. Ten hrs, then cool and skim of the hardened white fat globules. This stuff is high in bad cholesterol and sticks in your arteries just like it does to the roof of your mouth. The silverskin dissolves into gelatin, and mixes in nicely. Then reheat the shreaded meat with sauteed onions, mushrooms, green peppers, and Dinosaur BBQ Sensuous Slathering sauce, brown slightly in the skillet, and you have a melt in your mouth delicious entre to go with almost anything else... Yum!

From: elk yinzer
06-Dec-17
If anyone like Chipotle's Barbacoa, you can make a very simple recreation, if not better, using venison neck also. I do that, and toss the brisket in as well and make tacos, nachos, enchiladas, etc for over a week.

From: Woods Walker
06-Dec-17
"Ten hrs, then cool and skim of the hardened white fat globules"

Good tip! Thanks!

From: Lost Arra
06-Dec-17
I've found that elk or deer roasts cooked in my Instant Pot or crock pot are even better after being cooled then reheated. Flavors seem to soak in the meat.

From: PECO
06-Dec-17
Slow cook it all day, then shred it and can it. Makes awesome burrito's.

From: South Farm
06-Dec-17
Not a big roast guy here, I toss it in the trim pile and prefer to turn it into sausage. I'm sure somewhere there's someone that'll tell you they eat the hoof meat and it's "phenomenal".. LMAO

From: Woods Walker
06-Dec-17
My SOP has always been to bone everything, making steaks/chops/roasts from the loins and hindquarters and then scrapping the rest for ground jerky and sausage. But my wife found some REALLY good crock pot recipes for steak or any other piece of meat that are outstanding so I want to try some of these formerly scrap cuts with it.

I'm just leery of the fat......but I will try it.

From: Hackbow
06-Dec-17
South Farm - I hear ya on not being a roast fan. I used to eat venison roasts out of an obligation to use all the meat, or I would make it into burger or sometimes jerky. The slow cooker and tons of great recipes changed that for me.

And don't knock hoof meat until you've tried it! ;o)

From: Grubby
06-Dec-17
Like I said before, this is the best roast on the deer! Once it’s cooked all day it’s pretty easy to break it down and remove fat.

From: Fuzzy
06-Dec-17
South Farm, I never tried deer hooves but I'm a huge fan of pig's feet.

I love neck roasts and shank roasts from deer, elk, and moose.

From: South Farm
06-Dec-17
Ok, who's ate moose nose while we're at it!? lol

From: Joey Ward
06-Dec-17
Snot me.

And not one to try hoof in mouth, either.

From: Rut Nut
06-Dec-17

Rut Nut's embedded Photo
Rut Nut's embedded Photo
Any form of slow cooking is awesome for neck roasts. You can smoke them too. Here are some necks wrapped in bacon and smoked for 7-8 hrs Tasted Phenomenal!

From: Fuzzy
06-Dec-17
South Farm, never had moose nose but I've eaten a whole lot of pig snouts (in things like souse and scrapple) moose tongue is excellent, as are pig's, beef, bison, deer, and lamb...

  • Sitka Gear