Mathews Inc.
Giant archery ram — Nebraska!?
Wild Sheep
Contributors to this thread:
writer 05-Dec-17
njbuck 05-Dec-17
Eagle_eye_Andy 05-Dec-17
Treeline 05-Dec-17
Kurt 05-Dec-17
writer 05-Dec-17
midwest 05-Dec-17
walking buffalo 05-Dec-17
Bake 05-Dec-17
TerryD 05-Dec-17
Ironbow 05-Dec-17
Beav 05-Dec-17
midwest 05-Dec-17
Bake 05-Dec-17
LKH 05-Dec-17
sticksender 05-Dec-17
Paul@thefort 05-Dec-17
Surfbow 05-Dec-17
Mad Trapper 05-Dec-17
Highllainsdrifter 05-Dec-17
BTM 05-Dec-17
NvaGvUp 05-Dec-17
midwest 05-Dec-17
ground hunter 05-Dec-17
trkyslr 05-Dec-17
Bigpizzaman 05-Dec-17
Pope125 05-Dec-17
t-roy 05-Dec-17
Michael 05-Dec-17
BK 05-Dec-17
Bowboy 05-Dec-17
Highllainsdrifter 06-Dec-17
Beav 06-Dec-17
NvaGvUp 06-Dec-17
TD 07-Dec-17
Badlands 07-Dec-17
NvaGvUp 07-Dec-17
Surfbow 07-Dec-17
Dikndirt 08-Dec-17
NvaGvUp 09-Dec-17
writer 10-Dec-17
swampokie 10-Dec-17
StickFlicker 10-Dec-17
wildwilderness 12-Dec-17
NvaGvUp 15-Dec-17
StickFlicker 15-Dec-17
IdyllwildArcher 15-Dec-17
writer 17-Dec-17
StickFlicker 17-Dec-17
CWOotr 31-Jan-18
Pigsticker 31-Jan-18
MathewsMan 31-Jan-18
CWOotr 08-Feb-18
Mark Watkins 08-Feb-18
From: writer
05-Dec-17

writer's Link
Pretty impressive, and great anytime a bowhunter holds the overall state record, for any animal.

From: njbuck
05-Dec-17
Monster Ram.

05-Dec-17

Eagle_eye_Andy's Link
Two tags per year are given out I believe for Nebraska Big Horns. One is an auction tag and the other is a resident only lottery tag. This is a really cool thing for Nebraska and what a ram!!! See Link...

From: Treeline
05-Dec-17
Awesome ram! Congratulations to the hunter both for the funding provided to management of sheep in Nebraska and for closing the deal on a spectacular ram!

05-Dec-17
I did not even realize NE has sheep!

From: Kurt
05-Dec-17
Wonderful ram!!!!! Congrats to the hunter and his donation to Nebraska sheep! That part of Nebraska is neat country.....mini Blackhills area.

I do think the ram is 8 years old, not 10 as noted in the article.

From: writer
05-Dec-17
Nice to see support for someone who made such a donation, instead of the usual, “If I had that kinda money,” or “he bought it, he didn’t hunt it” sour grapes.

From: midwest
05-Dec-17
Yuge!

05-Dec-17
Beautiful ram!

But as Kurt noted, I can't see how this was aged at ten.

Heck, I don't see eight annuli.

Six?

From: Bake
05-Dec-17
I'd be curious to know where he killed it in the Wildcat hills, as I was there in early October antelope hunting, and was fortunate to see 3 rams one evening. One of them was a corker, and I sorta wonder whether this was him. . . .

Awesome ram for sure!

From: TerryD
05-Dec-17
As soon as I read auction tag, I quit reading.

From: Ironbow
05-Dec-17
Didn't even know NE had a bighorn season! Awesome ram.

From: Beav
05-Dec-17
We have had a population for a while now. They were relocated to a couple of different areas in the state. Hunters dollars from auction tags as well as application fees for the other tag are what have allowed a sheep population to exist here.

From: midwest
05-Dec-17
Western Nebraska is a pretty cool place.

From: Bake
05-Dec-17
I'd agree with Midwest, western Nebraska is pretty cool. I spent 3 days antelope hunting there this October, and it was a zoo. We saw tons of antelope. Saw several elk in or near the Wildcat hills (including an easy 320-330 ish bull bedding in a cornfield pivot with about a dozen cows), saw 3 bighorn rams, a ton of muleys, several whitetails, and some turkeys too.

I'd like to go back and spend some more time in those hills. . . . Fun place

From: LKH
05-Dec-17
It's hard to tell for sure, but the ram didn't appear to be more than 8 years old and was still putting on large annual growth. If I'm right about this, then Nebraska has some great future potential.

From: sticksender
05-Dec-17
Beautiful ram and how cool that he was taken by an archery hunter!

Agree with you Kurt & LKH....just from the one photo at least, he would appear to be 7.5.

From: Paul@thefort
05-Dec-17

Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Paul@thefort's embedded Photo
Interesting country to hunt BH sheep in Nebraska.

From: Surfbow
05-Dec-17
"As soon as I read auction tag, I quit reading." Nice attitude TerryD, you should've kept reading. Do you understand that these tag auctions raise a whole lot of money to help those species?

From the article: "Proceeds help fund the state's bighorn sheep management and reintroduction efforts."

...Beautiful ram!

From: Mad Trapper
05-Dec-17
Does anybody know what organization usually auctions off the tag?

05-Dec-17
Sheep Foundation I would guess

From: BTM
05-Dec-17
Interesting. I thought Nebraska had a single topo line running through the whole state! :)

From: NvaGvUp
05-Dec-17
TerryD,

"As soon as I read auction tag, I quit reading."

Care to 'splain that one, Lucy?"

From: midwest
05-Dec-17
Lol @ BTM!

05-Dec-17
I understand the auction and the money raised, which is needed,,,, however how many tags, do the locals get a crack at, I was curious,,,, beautiful animal

From: trkyslr
05-Dec-17
Congrats to Jason the hunter on the ram. He’s a big contributor to the sheep foundation. I think it’s awesome!

From: Bigpizzaman
05-Dec-17
Wow! Majestic!!! Congrats to the hunter!!!

From: Pope125
05-Dec-17
Hunted with Jason in Africa back in 2012 , very nice guy . At the time had a TV show .

From: t-roy
05-Dec-17
Beautiful ram!

On the other tag allocated to a resident, is it a pure lottery drawing, or do you build points?

From: Michael
05-Dec-17

Michael's embedded Photo
Michael's embedded Photo
Great looking Ram. Congrats to the hunter.

There are Big horns in the Wildcat hills as well as soldier creek wilderness by Crawford.

I have never seen any rams there however I did come across some Ewes with a couple of lambs one day. I thought it was pretty remarkable considering the troubles they have with lambs surviving.

From: BK
05-Dec-17
t-roy Nebraska usually offers 2 Bighorn tags per year , one is for auction, the other is for Nebraska residents only which is by lottery, no points or point creep, just have to have your non refundable money in by the deadline each year. The G & P looks at the herd quality each year in determining tags. There were some years in the past where both tags might not have been available that year.

From: Bowboy
05-Dec-17
What a toad. congrats to the hunter!

06-Dec-17
I am wondering if the sheep that were relocated to there have any original Missouri Breaks Montana genes ? Or are they from Colorado or somewhere else ?

From: Beav
06-Dec-17
I know that sheep were relocated from Montana and Alberta to Nebraska.

From: NvaGvUp
06-Dec-17
And now we all know that 'TerryD' doesn't want to respond to the question I asked him re. fundraising tags.

From: TD
07-Dec-17
I was just happy to see it taken with sharp sticks! Congrats to the hunter on a dandy.

From: Badlands
07-Dec-17
I'm a NE resident and keep putting in. Whoever draws the tag gets personally guided by NE F&G. They strictly manage this herd and it seems like they walk you up to the sheep they want taken. Would be a fun opportunity one day.

From: NvaGvUp
07-Dec-17
Badlands,

No one simply 'walks up to a wild sheep' in the wild.

No one.

From: Surfbow
07-Dec-17
^Ha, go for a walk up Waterton Canyon in Denver.

From: Dikndirt
08-Dec-17
Nva, I have driven by the sheep near Crawford NE in bow range and they never lifted their head from grazing....

From: NvaGvUp
09-Dec-17
James,

I do not question that.

Animals of all species can become comfortable with living in close proximity to humans.

Witness Boulder City, NV and Palm Desert, CA.

But in the wilds of Nebraska? Not so much.

From: writer
10-Dec-17
Something tells me the residents who've drawn their Nebraska sheep permit are pretty appreciative of the auction hunter's who've donated so much. Several times I've had to defend a friend who has purchased five Kansas elk permits via auction tags. Ed started with nothing, built it up through hard work and intelligence. Lost most of it in a divorce and then made it all over again. Totally self-made man. My response is now, "If you can't afford an auction permit to support game management, that's your fault, not his."

From: swampokie
10-Dec-17
I guess it’s the word donation that seems not To fit. Maybe investment would better apply. When I give a donation I generally don’t expect or receive anything in return. With and investment some return is expected.

From: StickFlicker
10-Dec-17
"If you can't afford an auction permit to support game management, that's your fault, not his."

Just because one person can afford it, and another can't (or can and doesn't want to buy the tag), does not provide justification for the existence of auction tags. You are assuming that all that are opposed to such tags are suffering from sour grapes, which is just not the case. There are certainly both positives and negatives from allowing such auction tags.

12-Dec-17

wildwilderness's embedded Photo
From the paper
wildwilderness's embedded Photo
From the paper
Very nice ram

From: NvaGvUp
15-Dec-17
Stickflicker,,

Just because one person can afford it, and another can't (or can and doesn't want to buy the tag), does not provide justification for the existence of auction tags."

I agree with your point about justifying the existence of fundraising tags based upon someone's income level.

After that, however, I will say, and absolutely know without question, that these tags are a YUGE source of critical funding for the state agencies and their ability to manage wild sheep, conduct surveys, and do translocations.

Fundraising tag ADD tags for the average Joe far beyond the one tag the average Joe cannot afford.

I talk with the state wildlife agencies in every one of the 'sheep states' in the west on a regular basis, and to a person, every single one of them tells me that if it weren't for the money the auctions and the raffles for the fundraising tags raise, they couldn't even do the minimum conservation efforts they are charged with doing.

The funds those auction tags raise cover those shortages and a lot more, therefore allowing the state Wildlife agencies to go beyond the 'minimum required,' and therefore, in the long run, provide MORE tags to the average Joe!

It's mind boggling to me that there are still people out there who either do not understand that, or (and there are few, I hope and pray) are so selfish that they simply want 'THEIR' tag NOW with no concern about the future for the resource nor the benefits for everyone else.

From: StickFlicker
15-Dec-17
Kyle,

I completely agree that the funds normally go to helping the species and ultimately putting more sheep on the mountain for all. I also appreciate all of your hard work and sacrifice in helping with that cause, so thank you. I wasn't taking a side, one way or the other, I was just pointing out the flaw of the previous poster in his implying that all those that are opposed to auction tags do so because they can't afford to buy one themselves. There are many reasons a person might be opposed to these auction tags other than financial envy.

That being said, I am opposed to many aspects of what the auction tags have become. I would personally prefer that the income produced by these special tags, and used to help the particular species, come from other sources. I would want that even if that meant that every hunter had to buy a special stamp (the total of all sales approximating the funds that the auction tags would have produced) or even a significant increase in permit fees to offset the loss. It doesn't particularly bother me that the wealthy can avoid waiting 30 years to draw a tag and can step to the front of the line, but the fact that they get to hunt before the person that waited all that time's season even begins, and sometimes can hunt statewide and year-round, does bother me. I think the tags would still sell for just as much, or very close to it, if the hunting "out of season" element was removed. I think simply jumping to the front of the line would be sufficient. The auction hunter's season should begin at the same time as the regular hunter. Perhaps it could run longer, but it shouldn't start earlier in my opinion. It used to be that way, in the early days of auction permits. At least in Arizona, I believe that the auction only bought the tag without having to wait or be subject to a bag limit. The fact that they often kill the biggest of a species that a state has to offer, year after year, because they get to hunt before the regular season opens, does bother me. The fact that a hunter that has applied for a hunt for years, possibly having applied for that particular hunt because he had found a huge trophy prior to applying, just to have it killed by an auction hunter days before his once in a lifetime hunt begins...bothers me.

I don't doubt that the money goes to a good cause, and helps the wildlife and hunters in general by ultimately providing more opportunity for all. I just don't personally feel that the ends justify the means, if there are other options that could provide the same funds. We all feel differently about this, and I completely respect that you might feel different. You have a different perspective, working so closely with sheep, than the average hunter has. But you can't fault the average hunter for having a different perspective either.

15-Dec-17
I like that CA has a raffle tag and an auction tag. The raffle allows the Joe Bluecollar Hunter the option of putting in a little or a moderate amount of his hard earned money for a chance at a tag and it still ends up providing money for the conservation of the specie.

From: writer
17-Dec-17
Every hunter buy a stamp instead...a buddy always paid more than $8k for the Kansas auction elk permit. So, there are 20 permits given. That’s only $400 per hunter for a stamp, on top of years of application fees and permit prices.

From: StickFlicker
17-Dec-17
writer, It wasn't my intent to hijack the thread celebrating the nice ram that was taken. So, I'll only make one more response. We could create a separate thread on the topic, if desired, but I don't see that accomplishing much.

I personally don't see your Kansas example as making the elk tags prohibitively expensive. That would take the elk permit's cost to something between $552 and $702 for an elk tag, an extremely rare animal to hunt in Kansas. I'm quite sure that the state could find far more than 20 people willing to pay that amount. In Arizona, residents pay $1,100 for a bison tag and it still takes decades to draw a tag due to the number of applicants. I think a rare animal with very few permits SHOULD cost significantly more than a deer tag. I also have no problem providing a raffle tag or two to help makeup the funds, so everyone has a chance (but still don't feel their season should begin prior to the regular season for the hunters that drew the tag).

I have no doubt that you can find scenarios where the stamp idea wouldn't work, but I think it would work in many Western States where such tags are most prevalent. My real issue, however, isn't that I'm completely opposed to the auction tags existing, but what they are becoming. I don't think that special tag hunters should be permitted to hunt before the draw hunters can, hunters who may have waited 10-30 years for the tag just to have an auction hunter kill the best trophy (or sometimes the only trophy of much quality) shortly before the actual season opens. I also question whether entering such trophies to record books coincides with "Fair Chase" in some cases, such as hunts that allow year-round 365 day hunting state-wide. But that's a whole different conversation!

From: CWOotr
31-Jan-18
Like all things that keep going and endure scrutiny, the positives out-weigh the negatives with auction tags and so they carry on. Get over it.

Jason is a good guy, an ethical bowhunter and I am proud to call him a friend. He has worked hard and smartly. He started his own business when his boss retired and closed the doors. It puzzles me that some people are jealous of successful people when all I do is admire them and try to learn from them. He has done well. Congrats all around.

From: Pigsticker
31-Jan-18
Why is it that game species needs more money but you never hear about non game species needing funding.

This is like the Social Security is going broke but welfare does not!

I am so done with politicians misleading people.

If a state has two tags then one of damn sure does not need to be auctioned off period.

This is like the Iowa celebrity tags! Unjust, uncalled for, and abuse to the people that pay the bulk of the money to support wildlife!

From: MathewsMan
31-Jan-18
Governor's Nebraska Sheep tag at GSCO went for $130k last weekend

From: CWOotr
08-Feb-18
Pigsticker,

For the record, the auction tag has enabled NE to be able to have a sheep population and some hunts. There wasn't justifiable funding available for such a small population and expensive transplant operations otherwise. A good number of resident NE sheep hunters can thank the auction tag for funding their opportunity to hunt with the resident drawn tag. The original subspecies native to NE was the Audubon Sheep that became extinct long ago.

As for non-game species, out west, the states do a pretty good job on them with big game hunters paying the bill. Here in CO, the CPW has brought back the Black-Footed Ferret and other species that are not hunted. The CPW also helped bring back the Greater Prairie Chicken and they are hunted once again.

From: Mark Watkins
08-Feb-18
So awesome to see....the fundraising, the stocking, the success and a happy hunter with a giant ram that helped make all this happen!

The North American Conservation Model works with great efficiency (and a lot of hard work)!

Mark

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