Summit Treestands
Garmin Xero A1 Auto Ranging Sight
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
No Mercy 10-Jan-18
No Mercy 10-Jan-18
drycreek 10-Jan-18
elkstabber 10-Jan-18
No Mercy 10-Jan-18
Brotsky 10-Jan-18
No Mercy 10-Jan-18
smarba 10-Jan-18
Trial153 10-Jan-18
Bowfreak 10-Jan-18
elk yinzer 10-Jan-18
elkstabber 10-Jan-18
Too Many Bows Bob 10-Jan-18
Kevin @ Wisconsin 10-Jan-18
cnelk 10-Jan-18
AhuntCDA, ID 10-Jan-18
Overland 10-Jan-18
loopmtz 10-Jan-18
Arrowhead 10-Jan-18
Missouribreaks 10-Jan-18
Genesis 10-Jan-18
Stekewood 10-Jan-18
Wood 10-Jan-18
LBshooter 10-Jan-18
Bowfreak 10-Jan-18
JTV 10-Jan-18
Missouribreaks 11-Jan-18
Nick Muche 11-Jan-18
cwater 11-Jan-18
Missouribreaks 11-Jan-18
midwest 11-Jan-18
Glunker 11-Jan-18
Glunker 11-Jan-18
Missouribreaks 11-Jan-18
skipmaster1 11-Jan-18
Jethro 11-Jan-18
Missouribreaks 11-Jan-18
stick slinger 11-Jan-18
LBshooter 11-Jan-18
Missouribreaks 11-Jan-18
smarba 11-Jan-18
WYelkhunter 12-Jan-18
splitlimb13 12-Jan-18
WV Mountaineer 12-Jan-18
Bou'bound 12-Jan-18
smarba 12-Jan-18
splitlimb13 12-Jan-18
marktm250 12-Jan-18
Charlie Rehor 12-Jan-18
lou sckaunt 13-Jan-18
loprofile 15-Jan-18
From: No Mercy
10-Jan-18

No Mercy's Link
Oh man......crazy how far technology has come.

From: No Mercy
10-Jan-18
A silent, single-button trigger mounted on the bow’s grip lets the archer range targets at rest or at full draw, virtually eliminating distance estimation and hunter movement – two of the biggest challenges in archery hunting. The laser range finder instantly provides the precise angle-compensated distance – up to 100 yards on game or 300 yards on reflective targets. The Xero then projects a precise, virtual LED pin that is only visible to the archer, and without the clutter of multiple physical pins. An ambient light sensor ensures the pin brightness is optimized for various shooting conditions.

“The Xero bow sight is truly a game-changer in the archery world. It helps take the guesswork out of ranging a target,” said Dan Bartel, vice president of worldwide sales. “When that buck of a lifetime walks by, knowing your precise yardage and having the exact pin to shoot is often the difference between making that shot or going home empty-handed.”

Archers can customize the Xero for single or multiple pin configurations, or they can manually select a pin of a pre-determined distance. A sunlight-readable display helps the user configure and customize the sight and provides information like target distance and angle. It also provides a shot odometer, so archers can keep tabs on how many times they’ve shot in one practice session or over the lifetime of the bow.

The Xero A1i includes many additional features. Laser Locate™ estimates the arrow’s point of impact and transfers that location to a compatible Garmin device (sold separately) so hunters know where to begin their recovery of game. The A1i also enables the archer to configure multiple arrow profiles, to easily transition between a target or hunting setup without readjusting the sight. Archers can also analyze and improve their performance with shot dynamics – information like arrow speed, roll of the bow, and bow impulse duration. Additionally, the A1i features user selectable red (default) and green LED pins.

The Xero operates up to a year on two AAA lithium batteries and comes in both right and left-handed configurations. Ruggedized and water rated to IPX7, the Xero can withstand the rigors of bowhunting. The Xero A1 has a minimum retail price of $799.99, and the A1i has a minimum retail price of $999.99. Both models are available in the first quarter of 2018. For more information, visit garmin.com/xero.

Some jurisdictions regulate or prohibit the use of electronic bow sights for hunting. Always know and obey all hunting regulations before using this device.

From: drycreek
10-Jan-18
Ok, but do I still have to gut the animal and drag it back to the truck ?

From: elkstabber
10-Jan-18
Does it tell you when you're aiming properly? Like on Star Wars?

From: No Mercy
10-Jan-18
Not legal in my state OR for entry into Pope and Young.

From: Brotsky
10-Jan-18
You should post this on the Leatherwall. They love stuff like this over there. :)

From: No Mercy
10-Jan-18
HAHAHA Brotsky. I stay away from there.

From: smarba
10-Jan-18
Handy GPS feature guides you to the shot location, in case it's in the next zip code and you can't just SEE where the animal was standing LOL

From: Trial153
10-Jan-18
I am going to sell this an offer a leather wall special discount.....

From: Bowfreak
10-Jan-18
Going to be a lot of places where this is illegal.

From: elk yinzer
10-Jan-18
Devils advocate (not saying this is my view but for discussion):

If technology can significantly reduce wounding loss what is a valid nonemotional, factual argument against it?

From: elkstabber
10-Jan-18
If it ranges and projects a dot up for the shooter than I think it might reduce wounding in open areas and increase wounding in areas with more brush, branches, or grass. In a normal situation the shooter may not get the range on the upcoming shot because the animal hasn't entered the shooting lane yet. But the shooter can easily range a nearby tree trunk and then estimate the animal's range from there. Then he can pick a pin and prepare for the animal to enter the shooting lane. But this Garmin device seems to take away that ability for the shooter to prepare for the shot in advance.

I bet that it would work well on targets that don't move.

10-Jan-18
$800-$1000. Seems like a lot. TMBB

10-Jan-18
It is a lot of money, but I love the technology and innovation.

It will be interesting if this will be a one off or if the rest of the industry will follow suit.

Does anyone else think it's odd that Garmin is jumping into the bow sight business??

From: cnelk
10-Jan-18
Lets see...

I have a $400 rangefinder and a $300 sight now.

That $800-$1000 isnt outrageous

From: AhuntCDA, ID
10-Jan-18
Surely not legal in ID.

From: Overland
10-Jan-18

Overland's Link
Here's a longer video posted today that explains it a little better: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6PlGCjx4OQ

From: loopmtz
10-Jan-18
Holy smokes, that is cool!

From: Arrowhead
10-Jan-18
But does it tell me or automatically calculate the drop of a deer after ranging the distance and angle. I would need one that can follow the point of aim after release should the target move upon the shot. Sort of like radar lock on the SR-71. It would also need to calculate and follow the target not only up or down but left and right as well. It would have to be set up so that your arrow would work in conjunction with the sight as to create the new and improved version. (Garmin Zero Radar Lock Tracking Sight With New Arrow Technology) You could call it the Mini-Mighty Arrow. P.S. they already have explosive tips developed. Just watch Rambo!

10-Jan-18
Just part of the evolution of bowhunting as many have stated over and over on this board. Look at all the tech advancements and state law changes in bowhunting, crossbows and muzzleloaders since 1970, almost all supported by the vast majority of hunters right here on this very board. Just part of the evolution as they say!

From: Genesis
10-Jan-18
I'm a purist,I shoot a crossbow :)

From: Stekewood
10-Jan-18
Legal and ethical arguments aside, the technology is awesome. Basically an on board computer for your bow.

From: Wood
10-Jan-18
Might be good for Redding.

From: LBshooter
10-Jan-18
Is the intent to take any and all of the skill of shooting a bow out of the archers/hunters hand? As it stands now shooting a compound or as I call them a compgun requires very little skill any longer. I won't be surprised if in a few years someone develops and stand for the bow and all the shooter has to do is hit the remote and it will shoot itself. Technology has created a bunch of inferior hunters/shooters.

From: Bowfreak
10-Jan-18
Brad,

What kind of sight and rangefinder do you have? I thought you would have fabricated both instead paying $700. :)

From: JTV
10-Jan-18
What happens when the lens fogs up, what happens in freezing drizzle/rain/heavy snow... what about using in fog ? .. some rangefinders will not work in fog or a rain/mist .. what about leaf cover and branches ??....how sturdy is it ? .. will it actually take the abuse of a full hunting season, what about riding on an ATV or a horse ? ....$800-$1000 ?... heck, I dont want to pay that for a bow ...I'm sure some guppies and the tec nuts will scoop it up.. hell, they pay that much for new damn smartphone every year ...

11-Jan-18
Marching towards one season, use whatever weapon you please. Real bowhunting had a long run and was great for those of us who chose to embrace the challenge. Many archery season hunters will never experience it.

From: Nick Muche
11-Jan-18
"Marching towards one season, use whatever weapon you please."

Sounds a lot like Alaska, still plenty of "real bowhunting" to be had up there.

From: cwater
11-Jan-18
i have one on my bow, and used it this season for testing and fine tuning. Its pretty amazing at the things it can do.... i do understand where people are whining about technology, but if your that guy...i expect that you are using a long bow with no sights and wooden arrows right?! Anything to help someone make a more ethical shot, and hopefully not as many wounded deer, IM ALL FOR IT!

11-Jan-18
Correct, longbow (selfbow) and cedar arrows for 49 years.

From: midwest
11-Jan-18
"Anything to help someone make a more ethical shot, and hopefully not as many wounded deer, IM ALL FOR IT!"

Devil's advocate....If that's the goal, then shouldn't we eliminate bowhunting all together?

From: Glunker
11-Jan-18
I am only buying one if it can green score all 28 big game animals. I have found bears difficult to score on the run. Mtn lions the same way.

From: Glunker
11-Jan-18
Archery talk has posts about how anything that helps with a quicker more humane kill is good. That is overly general as with that reasoning a pod arrow is a positive advancement. Don't think so.

11-Jan-18
If wounding is the primary concern.... then hunting should be eliminated. I agree with Midwest.

From: skipmaster1
11-Jan-18
What happens when you have a deer at 45 yards and a wall of brush at 25. You have to aim directly at the brush and let your arrow arc over it. The arrow has a clear path but it seems like this sight will having you shoot straight into the brush.

From: Jethro
11-Jan-18
Wounding is not a concern. Just last week we determined that 100 yards is the new 40. As long as you practice.

11-Jan-18
Correct Jethro.

11-Jan-18
Surprised It doesn’t have a red dot laser that you just place where you want to hit. With the other technology on this that is the obvious next step. Watch the target, not your sight.

From: LBshooter
11-Jan-18
If wounding is a concern and tech is the way to stop it then all the tech out today hasn't helped. Just look at the shows with all the tech they have and still, they seem to hit things alittle farther back then they like lol. Wounding is a poor excuse to use when it's used as an argument for more tech. If wounding was a concern then guys would take shots that are 20 yards or less with a perfectly broadside shot, but they don't. 40,50 60 and now 100 yard shots are the goal. At these distances wounding is going to go up, there are just to many variables with shooting wild animals and if the Hunter is being honest they would admit to wounding more game then they do, especially the ones trying the long distance shots.

11-Jan-18
Right on LB.

From: smarba
11-Jan-18
Ditto LB

From: WYelkhunter
12-Jan-18
I don't see how this is any different than ranging an animal with a handheld range finder and then using the proper pin. You still have to be able to hold steady and make a shot to set up the sight by shooting different distances and adjusting it just like a fixed pin sight. I honestly don't see where this sight does anything for you. You have to sight the sight in just like regular sight. You have to push a button to range the animal just like a regular rangefinder. The only thing it does is it only shows one pin when you are ready to shoot, thus eliminating the chance of using the wrong pin if you have done your part right.

I wont be using one because it costs way to much for me and probably about 90% of the hunters out there. I have a range finder I bought used for $75 and I have been using for about 8 years now, if I replace it, it will be with another cheap used one. My 5 pin sight cost me about $55 new and have never wished I had a different one.

From: splitlimb13
12-Jan-18
I currently shoot 7 deadly pins by spot hog. I've been very successful with my current set up. Durability is my main concern with this sight . My spot hog has been tortured and never had any issues. I will see for spot and stalk hunting, mule deer,elk, antelope etc. The convenience of this device is awesome. I don't see really any benefit to it for the tree stand or grown blind hunter sitting on a feeder or in thick country. Has anyone confirmed the warranty?

12-Jan-18
They’ve had bow mounted laser range finders for about 10 years or more. Maybe 20. This isn’t what the trade guys are making it out to be. I’m a trad guy too. So, I’m not bashing them. But, these are the same men that tell you how good and noble they are, while you are cheating by using a compound. So, take their opinions knowing that.

This sight isn’t for me. To much $. But, I see as many disadvantages to it as I see advantages. But, I’m not a self righteous trad to the bone guy. Been there and done it. It’s no harder than a compound once you’ve mastered your form and shot sequence. Some people just want you to think they are special.

From: Bou'bound
12-Jan-18
does the batteries it runs on fit in the trail cameras that they guy uses so he does not have to actually go into the woods and look for game.

From: smarba
12-Jan-18
Bou: the trail cam projects larger antlers and a pot belly onto the deer you're shooting so you can feel like every deer you aim at is a Booner LOL.

From: splitlimb13
12-Jan-18
The warranty that comes with this sight is pathetic. $1000 dollars for a sight with a 1 year manufacturer warranty!!! They can keep it.

From: marktm250
12-Jan-18
Whether its a computerized holographic pin or a simple fixed pin you taped to your riser, if you torque your bow, drop your bow arm at steep angles or punch the trigger in excitement, the arrow may not end up where that pin was pointing.

Ranging is important, but is only part of the equation.

12-Jan-18
Five years ago it was Leopold with the "game changer" rangefinder mounted to the bow. I'll bet they won't be available in three years. It's a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.

From: lou sckaunt
13-Jan-18
ya'll keep making bowhunting easier and easier than they are going to keep making the tags harder and harder to get. 100+ yard shots and all...

From: loprofile
15-Jan-18
Wonder if they make a mounting adapter for my longbow

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