Carbon Express Arrows
We Got It- It's Official
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Buffalo1 11-Feb-18
Butcher 11-Feb-18
drycreek 11-Feb-18
Glunt@work 11-Feb-18
Thornton 11-Feb-18
Jaquomo 11-Feb-18
Bowriter 12-Feb-18
jstephens61 12-Feb-18
DoorKnob 12-Feb-18
1boonr 12-Feb-18
Tonybear61 12-Feb-18
drycreek 12-Feb-18
shiloh 12-Feb-18
Glunt@work 13-Feb-18
Jaquomo 13-Feb-18
Bentstick81 13-Feb-18
From: Buffalo1
11-Feb-18

Buffalo1's Link
Bad news for the MS whitetail herd. Issaquena County lies next to the MS River in the lower central region of the MS Delta.

From: Butcher
11-Feb-18
Yep just reading about it.

From: drycreek
11-Feb-18
Eventually, everybody is gonna have it, and I'm not sure we don't all have it now to some degree. I truly believe that it's only because of all the testing that game departments do now that it has been "discovered" in so many places. I was wrong once before, but that's what I think.

From: Glunt@work
11-Feb-18
As long as your wildlife department doesn't take the approach of culling herd numbers to very low levels, my guess is you won't see much difference. CWD may have been around long before we knew how to test for it.

From: Thornton
11-Feb-18
This sounds like the ridiculousness the news makes about this years influenza. Not everyone is going to die and neither are the deer. A biologist in Colorado told my outfitter friend that CWD has probably always been present

From: Jaquomo
11-Feb-18
The five stages of CWD: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, Acceptance.

It's the bargaining-depression stage transition that's dangerous, when game departments panic and start acting irrationally. They know there's nothing they can do, but still feel compelled to "try something".

From: Bowriter
12-Feb-18
Don't panic. I feel pretty sure, any area or state that has a cervid population had it for about as long as they have had a ceriv population. I suspect it is pretty prevalent in Caribou. They didn't discover the disease in 1968, they discovered a way to test for it.

From: jstephens61
12-Feb-18
It’s the end of your deer herd! Haven’t you heard, there’s no more deer in Illinois.

From: DoorKnob
12-Feb-18
^ Fibber ---- he he he

From: 1boonr
12-Feb-18
Jim- talk to some of the Guy’s who’ve had sharpshooters next to their property. It is the end of deer hunting for them. When cwd gets into your area and the sharpshooters show up you’ll sing a different tune

From: Tonybear61
12-Feb-18
Yeah just look at zone 603 in MN, former trophy area of the SE

From: drycreek
12-Feb-18
No sharpshooters here......yet. The state did enact some rules (that should have been in place long before) concerning the "deer farmers" though. The big money interests have long had a tail hold on the TPWD, but this may change it. Now, no bones, uncleaned skulls, etc. can be imported, no pen raised deer can be released on low-fence areas, and there may be other restrictions that I can't think of right now. These are just common sense precautions that probably should have been in place for years. The State of Texas is rather hotly divided when it comes to high fenced deer operations, especially the "kick and shoot" type. It stirs up some really strong discussions when CWD is thrown in the mix.

From: shiloh
12-Feb-18
I was told that free range deer could get infected by touching the muzzle of a pen deer through the pen. Not sure if this is accurate, but makes sense.

From: Glunt@work
13-Feb-18
Maybe, but the wild reindeer in Norway that test positive have had no contact with a pen raised whitetail in the US.. I think its been around a long time.

From: Jaquomo
13-Feb-18
Some researchers studying the Norway outbreak believe it may occur spontaneously, through a "folding" mutation of the prions (proteins). It then gets passed on to some - but not all - others that have contact with the infected one.

From: Bentstick81
13-Feb-18
1Booner. Good post. Exactly!

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