DeerBuilder.com
Skunks, rabies
Virginia
Contributors to this thread:
Fuzzy 21-Oct-15
fishfry 22-Oct-15
Fuzzy 22-Oct-15
Fuzzy 23-Oct-15
Fuzzy 23-Oct-15
Fuzzy 23-Dec-15
Machias 23-Dec-15
tonyo6302 24-Dec-15
Machias 25-Dec-15
tonyo6302 26-Dec-15
Fuzzy 28-Dec-15
Bogenschütze II 28-Dec-15
tonyo6302 29-Dec-15
Fuzzy 29-Dec-16
Fuzzy 17-Apr-17
Fuzzy 25-Apr-17
Fuzzy 25-May-17
Fuzzy 26-May-17
Fuzzy 04-Oct-17
From: Fuzzy
21-Oct-15
This isn't directly bow hunting related, but I wanted to give you all a "heads up" for your time in the woods and fields. We are seeing in the Valley-And-Ridge, Blue Ridge, and Western Piedmont, a higher than usual number of animals testing positive for raccoon varaiant rabies, and a high percentage of these positives are skunks.

Be very careful with any wild mammal that is acting strangely, and particularly with skunks which are out in daylight, act aggressive, ill, disoriented, or partially paralyzed.

Report any human contact with skunks, raccoon, foxes, bobcats, feral cats, coyotes, or other wild mammals to the local health department.

Any mammal can be rabid, but small rodents, rabbits, and opossums, usually don't get rabies.

We do get a rabid groundhog fairly often.

We've also seen a lot of rabid livestock, cows and goats, possibly b/c skunks are often closely associated with pastureland.

PLEASE do not trap and relocate any wild or feral mammal. If an animal is causing problems, kill it, don't move it. Moving wildlife assists the spread of rabies.

Hunt safe.

Cecil

From: fishfry
22-Oct-15
not really related but saw a gang of turkeys run over to a skunk that was walking along the edge of a cut corn field and follow it for 200 yards or so,odd i thought

From: Fuzzy
22-Oct-15
that IS odd... turkeys huh? Must've been something strange about that skunk.

From: Fuzzy
23-Oct-15

From: Fuzzy
23-Oct-15

Fuzzy's embedded Photo
Fuzzy's embedded Photo
The blue lines to the left are areas where an aerial program has been implemented by USDA/APHIS to distribute an oral rabies vaccine, which pretty much only works for raccoon (fish oil based attractant). As you can see, those areas had very few rabid animals, everything East (to the right) of the line, has lots of rabid animals. Several tested positives were actually omitted from this map because of the testing method used. (not yet approved by CDC but very accurate)

From: Fuzzy
23-Dec-15
warm weather means they're still popping up, though they've slowed down.

From: Machias
23-Dec-15
I caught 3 so far this week. Great looking fur!!

From: tonyo6302
24-Dec-15

tonyo6302's embedded Photo
tonyo6302's embedded Photo
Every year someone in my neighborhood gets attacked by a rabid fox.

I do my part, as much as I can.

Tony - Fredericksburg

From: Machias
25-Dec-15
Sweet shot!! Nice looking grey, you getting it tanned?

From: tonyo6302
26-Dec-15
I gave it to a friend.

Shot the Fox first, then had 6 deer walk right by it, paying it no mind at all. One Doe stepped right over it while eating acorns.

From: Fuzzy
28-Dec-15
yeah they see dead criters in the woods all the time.

I agree, thin em down guys, ESPECIALLY skunks and raccoons, I'm about ready to start raccoon trapping again.

28-Dec-15
Nice shot, Tony.....you've still got the touch!

From: tonyo6302
29-Dec-15
Ralph, I had great IBEP Instructors.

:^)

From: Fuzzy
29-Dec-16
"upping" this, as we are still seeing skunks come up rabid, regularly. Y'all be safe.

From: Fuzzy
17-Apr-17
so far a few rabid critters (including one stray/feral cat) but not like 2015/16

From: Fuzzy
25-Apr-17
results reported from VDH on DCLS-tested positive confirmed rabid animals (including livestock) in Mount Rogers District, was 11 total for 2016, down significantly from the 45 total in 2015.

From: Fuzzy
25-May-17
raccoon rabies is a slippery thing. APHIS is trying to hold the Western edge of the Appalachians, and gradually push the vaccine line Eastward, but these "breaks in the fireline" make it tough. I'd like to stress again, if you for any reason, trap small carnivores, ie: raccoon, skunk, fox, coyote, bobcat etc DO NOT release them alive at another location! This is what can negate an effort to control the spread, which costs millions. DON'T MOVE WILDLIFE!

Safeguarding American Agriculture APHIS is an agency of USDA’s Marketing and Regulatory Programs An Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services P.O. Box 130 Moseley, VA 23120 (804) 739-7739 (804) 739-7738 fax Federal Relay Service (Voice/TTY/ASCII/Spanish) 1-800-877-8339 May 24, 2017 Dear Cooperator: The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Wildlife Services program (WS) will conduct an emergency spring oral rabies vaccine (ORV) bait distribution program in southwestern Virginia to vaccinate raccoons against the rabies virus. Bait distribution in Virginia is part of a nationwide, cooperative effort by USDA to prevent the westward spread of raccoon rabies in the eastern United States. Implementation of this program in Virginia is a cooperative effort between USDA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Virginia Department of Health, and other state agencies. The spring 2017 baiting campaign is being conducted in response to a rabies-positive raccoon reported from the Big Stone Gap area of Wise County, VA, where rabies was not previously detected. Beginning on or about May 31, 2017, approximately 355,000 coated sachet baits containing the oral rabies vaccine will be distributed across a 608 square-mile bait zone in parts of Lee, Wise, and Wise County, Virginia, including the communities of Appalachia, Big Stone Gap, Dryden, Duffield, Norton, and Wise. Baits will be distributed by low-flying fixed wing airplanes and a helicopter. The aerial bait drop is expected to last for about 1 week. This effort will be repeated in October 2017 as part of a larger rabies baiting project. As the oral rabies vaccination baits are aerially distributed, a navigator controls the bait machine and turns off the machine as necessary to avoid dropping baits on roadways, structures, large bodies of water, etc. The ORV baits which will be distributed are RABORAL V-RG® coated sachets. The coated sachet is a plastic packet of vaccine coated with a sticky, fish-scented substance to attract raccoons. Each bait is marked with a toll-free number (1-877-722-6725) for people to call for assistance or information if they find or come in contact with a bait. Oral Rabies Vaccine baits: fishmeal polymer (left) and coated sachet (right). We recommend the following precautions in case ORV baits are found by persons or pets: • If your pet finds an ORV bait, do not attempt removal of the bait from your pet’s mouth, as you could be bitten. Eating the baits will not harmyour pet. • Confine your pet and look for other baits in the area. These baits should be removed from areas where your pet could eat them. • Instruct children to leave baits alone. • Wear gloves or use a towel when you pick up the bait. Although there is no harm in touching an undamaged bait, they have a strong fishmeal smell. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water if there is any chance that the vaccine sachet has been ruptured. • If a person or pet is exposed to the vaccine contained within the bait, call the toll-free number on the bait (1-877-722-6725) to report the bait contact. Please contact the USDA at 804-739-7739 if you have any questions about the Wildlife Services Oral Rabies Vaccination Program. Enclosed is a map of the 2017 spring bait distribution zone relative to the historic baiting area. Additional information is also available from the website: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife-damage/rabies Thank you in advance for your attention to this important public health effort. Sincerely, Eric Wilhelm Wildlife Biologist USDA-Wildlife Services Eric.S.Wilhelm@aphis.usda.gov

From: Fuzzy
26-May-17
that was cut and paste and the map didn't attach. Essentially they are going bak "behind the line" and hitting a section of Wise and Buchanan Counties with the oral vaccine, to try and stamp out a flare up before it gets started heading west. The concensus is that if raccoon rabies makes it to the Ohio River it won't be stoppable and will sweep the mid-west, costing hundreds of millions in livestock loss, human vaccines, and monitoring.

From: Fuzzy
04-Oct-17
The main "drop" of oral rabies vaccine is currently ongoing in western Giles, North Western and Central Bland, Washington, Smyth, and Grayson Counties. The vaccine packets resemble a fast food mayonnaise packet, only smaller, and are printed with contact info. They are harmless to people and pets but should be left in place and not handled, so the vaccine can be contacted by the target animals.

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