Moultrie Products
First lost deer
New York
Contributors to this thread:
BigJoe 07-Oct-17
Buckstopshere 07-Oct-17
BigJoe 07-Oct-17
T Mac 08-Oct-17
bow shot 08-Oct-17
Somersbow 08-Oct-17
Jfb 09-Oct-17
Arrowone 09-Oct-17
Mint 09-Oct-17
Mad dog 09-Oct-17
ArrowOne 11-Oct-17
Mad dog 11-Oct-17
Arrowone 12-Oct-17
bow shot 13-Oct-17
From: BigJoe
07-Oct-17
Tuesday Oct. 3, first day out in my blind and set up by sunrise. At 7:40am a doe and a young buck 4 pts suddenly appear 20 yards in front of me. I had the chance of either doe or buck, went for buck. He must have jumped the string and I may have frazzled the shot but it hit him real high and forward; I saw the arrow up to the fletching as they ran away. I knew immediately it was a terrible shot. Waited over two hours before beginning to track. There was not one drop of blood to be seen anywhere, I mean not one. Since I am new to bow hunting I think in reviewing everything I probably miscalculated the shot somehow and he jumped the string. Looked for 4 days for that deer. Near sunset on that first day I was searching an area I'd seen a doe (possibly the same) hovering in the area, and in a logical direction it might have gone, but off my property. I was able to get permission to search neighbors woods behind big field, again I saw the doe. I take it she was staying close to the wounded buck because I have always seen those two together over the past year. I made my way up a semi clearing hillock and suddenly heard mad scrambling and dash through the leaves, but did not see deer. I think it was the buck, he went way off the reservation toward an area that has a huge lot of woods, but way way off my property. Drove by there a few times today scoping but nothing. I am assuming hopefully he will survive. If that was him I spooked in the woods and he was still alive over 10 hrs after being shot chances he may live another day. I learned more from this experience than I could have learned in a decade of reading books or articles on deer hunting with bow. But, I am still somewhat heartsick, frustrated, angry at myself. Have not take up the bow since then but slowly feeling like I should get back out there and try again.

07-Oct-17
We've all been there. We all hate to lose a deer we hit, but hunt enough, and it will happen. I rationalize by trying to look at it from the deer's perspective..."Hey, he hit me high in the shoulder...no prob. I'm alive." They are amazingly tough critters. You will hunt another day, and he might or might not be there. Turn the page and get better.

From: BigJoe
07-Oct-17
Good advice, thanks.

From: T Mac
08-Oct-17
Get back out there. Trying to remain calm and composed before the shot is something I still struggle with especially if I see the deer from afar and they begin to come closer. Stay after it and it will all come together!

From: bow shot
08-Oct-17
Yup. Get right back in the saddle. Do your darndest not to make mistakes, but accept the fact they are beyond our control sometimes. Mourn, but don't over-do it. Remember that if deer were carnivores, they would disembowel and eat you while you screamed for mercy, just like the bugs, skunks, wolves and lions do. But we do implement mercy and kindness to the absolute best of our ability.

I'm for ya, get back out there my friend!

From: Somersbow
08-Oct-17
What everyone else said. Sounds like you did all you could to follow up. Stuff happens sometimes.

Get back out there and try not to make the same mistakes twice.

Good luck.

From: Jfb
09-Oct-17
I agree with the others. I would add to consider contacting Deer Search who are allowed to use tracking dogs. It's a free service run by volunteers and donations are accepted. The key for a successful dog track is that once you realize it's not an immediate leathal hit that you back out and call. Once you start blind searching you are spreading deer and blood scent all over making the dogs job very tough and likely pushing the deer a long ways. As stated, we have all been there and good luck.

From: Arrowone
09-Oct-17
BigJoe that's a tough one. We have all been there. No matter how much experience and how much practice, wounds and misses are part of the process. And it always feels bad. The area between the lungs and the spine might get you some blood but is not usually fatal. My guess is that deer is fine. If he did die, it sucks not to recover him, but he will serve as sustenance for many other critters in the woods. That's a good thing. Get back in there and really focus on the next shot. And enjoy the hunt!! Good luck.

From: Mint
09-Oct-17

Mint's embedded Photo
Mint's embedded Photo
From where you describe the hit 'll bet that buck will be fine. Keep a copy of this picture on your phone.

From: Mad dog
09-Oct-17
It wasn't your intention! You wanted to bag that deer. This is a brutally difficult sport. The biggest thing I learned, was lots of practice for all angles and. Positions. Make sure u practice on a 3 D deer decoy. Commend you for your honesty Mad Dog

From: ArrowOne
11-Oct-17
Great advice on the 3 D deer. Also, if possible practice shooting out of the blind or sitting or kneeling position, whatever you use in the blind, to recreate as best you can the shooting conditions in the field. I keep a stand and ladder sticks set up in my yard so I can practice on the 3d deer throughout the season. It's a big help.

From: Mad dog
11-Oct-17
Me too. Crazy angles positions. I try to draw and shoot quickly. Once I went from block target to 3 D, started nailing them everytime. Mad Dog

From: Arrowone
12-Oct-17
Mad dog same here. It's made a big difference for me the last couple of years. I hope I didn't just jinx myself. When I get home after am hunts I'll go up with all my gear on and shoot a practice broadhead and 5 field points. I change the distance and angle every day.

From: bow shot
13-Oct-17
Stump shooting is big for me. Shoot between/behind saplings, etc. Smack some chipmunks too. The numbers (chipmunks) in my area are absolutely insane this year. You know what that means: disease and death, they will crash. Its like Eastern version of prairie dog hunting, and perfect for bow because they are super tolerant of misses and close range. Whack a few of them and your confidence will soar.

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