Carbon Express Arrows
Landowner vs. Hunt own land permit
Kansas
Contributors to this thread:
Copperhead 19-Nov-17
KSUBRAN 19-Nov-17
One Arrow 19-Nov-17
Thornton 19-Nov-17
KSUBRAN 19-Nov-17
Copperhead 19-Nov-17
writer 20-Nov-17
z hunter 20-Nov-17
From: Copperhead
19-Nov-17
I've searched on the KDWPT website and need a clearer explanation. Is a landowner permit different from a hunt own land permit? I found that with a hunt own land permit you don't need a hunting license. But is there a requirement for a designated amount of acreage for the hunt own land permit?

Real answers only no guessing, please.

From: KSUBRAN
19-Nov-17
This info is for resident landowner/tenant permit only, I don't know if the rule is different for a non-resident landowner/tenant. You need at least 80 acres per permit requested. I own 160 acres, so that qualifies for two landowner/tenant permits, if I have two individuals that meet the landowner/tenant definition. For example, my Wife and I can both buy a landowner permit. I get a $20 discount for buying the landowner permit. If I buy a hunt own land permit, I can only hunt on my land. I buy the resident landowner permit, which is still at the discounted price, but allows me to hunt on land that I do not own provided I have permission to do so. Description of Landowner: A landowner is any resident who owns 80 acres or more of Kansas farm or ranch land. When applying for a landowner/tenant permit, land owned must be in the unit applying for.

Description of Tenant:A tenant is any resident or nonresident who is actively engaged in the agricultural operation of 80 acres or more of Kansas farm or ranch land for the purpose of producing agricultural commodities or livestock and (A) has a substantial financial investment in the production of agricultural commodities or livestock on such farm or ranch land and the potential to realize substantial financial benefit from such production or, (B) is a bona fide manager having an overall responsibility to direct, supervise and conduct such agricultural operation and have the potential to realize substantial benefit from such production in the form of salary, shares of such production or some other economic incentive based upon such production. Evidence of tenancy, if requested, shall be provided to the department and may include, but is not limited to, Natural Resource Conservation Service records, Farm Service Agency records, or written agricultural contract or lease documentation. Land must be located in the unit you are applying for to qualify.

Members of the immediate family who are domiciled with a resident landowner or tenant may apply for a resident big game permit as a landowner or as a tenant, but at least 80 acres must be owned by such landowner or operated by such tenant for each individual applying as a landowner or as a tenant.

From: One Arrow
19-Nov-17
Ksurban... I think you might want to call Pratt about the tenant permit. Don’t think “permission” on property qualifies, but could be wrong.

From: Thornton
19-Nov-17
If you buy the landowner tag like I do, you can hunt anywhere in the state. If you buy the hunt own land tag, well, you can only hunt your own land

From: KSUBRAN
19-Nov-17
I have a resident landowner permit, not hunt own land permit. So I can hunt someone else's land, if they give me permission to do so. Or I could also hunt state managed land such as walk in hunting.

From: Copperhead
19-Nov-17
What I read in the regulations was that you do not have to buy a hunting license if you buy the hunt own land permit and can hunt any legal species during their particular seasons without a hunting license. Which is the same to me as fishing in your own pond without a license the difference being you don't have to own 80 acres for fishing. So why do you have to own 80 acres for hunting if you only hunt your own land?

From: writer
20-Nov-17
620-672-5911 Ask for licensing

From: z hunter
20-Nov-17
Because owning 79.9 acres does not qualify.

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