Summit Treestands
Permission strategy
Massachusetts
Contributors to this thread:
pondboy 04-Dec-17
Cougar 04-Dec-17
Sosso 04-Dec-17
GED 04-Dec-17
mrw 05-Dec-17
pondboy 05-Dec-17
Will 05-Dec-17
Jebediah 05-Dec-17
mrw 05-Dec-17
Jebediah 05-Dec-17
pondboy 05-Dec-17
Bones1918 08-Dec-17
Jebediah 08-Dec-17
xi 08-Dec-17
Fess613 08-Dec-17
muzzy 08-Dec-17
Jebediah 08-Dec-17
Pi 09-Dec-17
pondboy 09-Dec-17
Jebediah 09-Dec-17
Pi 09-Dec-17
Jebediah 09-Dec-17
Pi 10-Dec-17
From: pondboy
04-Dec-17
I am starting to look for some private permissions for next season. Got turned down by this one man who owned a beautiful peice of property, he was not against hunters what so ever, but he had bad experiences with hunters littering on his property and consequently wont let anyone hunt it anymore. Do you guys think it would be too pushy to stop by in a month or so and bring him venison, or ask if he needs help around the property? This piece is sweet and I really want to find a way to get permission. While on the topic, many of you can agree that the best time to scout is post season in the winter, what strategies do you guys have to gain permission/ scout in the late season? Since I have seen it brought up a few times that people like to scout/ still hunt during the traditional season. Thanks, jack

From: Cougar
04-Dec-17
i would offer to clean up what someone else dumped or left behind...

From: Sosso
04-Dec-17
Bring venison and offer a $200 up front litter deposit.

From: GED
04-Dec-17
I would move along. I wouldn’t like someone to ask again after I already said no

From: mrw
05-Dec-17
You don't want to annoy him, but if you show up polite and respectful he might come around. Offering venison or a hand around the property will show you're not taking it lightly and could very well get you permission. I've moved a lot of hay to hunt one farm.

From: pondboy
05-Dec-17
Thanks guys, I am definetely going to ask other land owners but this particular permission would make my life 100 times easier when hunting the public land behind it. Especially because i would also have access to a powerline that runs through the property

From: Will
05-Dec-17
Think really long term. May not work now, but it might in 1-2 years.

It's almost Christmas/New Years. Get a nice card, and neatly hand write a note. Something like: ------ Dear Mr and Mrs X,

Thank you for speaking with me regarding hunting your property earlier this year. I really appreciated your willingness to speak with me - Thank You.

Have an excellent holiday season, and a great start to 2018! Be well PondBoy ------

You are not asking. But it shows a lot of respect and gratitude... which will be remembered. As others noted, if you see trash or something on the side of the road near their land, stop and ask: "Hi Mr/Mrs X, I was driving by and saw a bunch of trash dumped on the side of the road on your property over there, do you mind if I pick it up and get rid of it for you?"

Mid summer next year, ask again to hunt.

it's probable they say no. Maybe they say yes... Those nice things done along the way wont hurt. Worst case you may change a negative view of hunters if there is one. Likewise, keep your hunting requests focused on ARCHERY only. Forget guns for a while. Often it's not hunting so much as guns that freaks people. If you focus on archery, that seems safer to folks.

Ive been fortunate, and most of the private land I hunt in MA I've had permission on for literally more than a decade - talk about lucky! Lots of gratitude is the key (honestly though, that's a key to life, not just hunting permission)...

From: Jebediah
05-Dec-17
The "security deposit" idea, concerning littering, or even generally, is pretty interesting.

From: mrw
05-Dec-17
Careful exchanging money, because you actually do the land owner a dis-service. If they let you use their land and do not charge a fee they have no liability, once money changes hands that goes out the window. That's a good Mass law to have in writing to show when you go looking for permission.

From: Jebediah
05-Dec-17
Agree. That's a risk. My thinking, though, is that it's not a fee for use. It's either recovered from escrow,, or it's a fine for littering. Regardless, you're right it's a risk.

From: pondboy
05-Dec-17
thanks for the advice, good ideas. I scouted out back behind the property on public today and its loaded with sign, i can still hunt there regardless if i get permission, but it would be much easier to hunt with that access

From: Bones1918
08-Dec-17
I have little business cards made up with a classy little picture of a goose on it. Everyone hates geese. Don't show up in camo and don't show up during the season.

From: Jebediah
08-Dec-17
No track record of success to back this up, but I have two thoughts: show up on a very nice day in the Spring/early summer. This both provides plenty of notice (assuming we're talking about deer), and also doesn't bring the homeowner to the door on a miserable day, weather-wise.

From: xi
08-Dec-17
X2 on Wills' thinking. It's like eating an elephant, one bite at a time and eventually your on it. And done with the elephant too !

From: Fess613
08-Dec-17
Wait till spring, maybe get permission to turkey hunt and offer to police his property for him. Hopefully building trust and more opportunities for the future

From: muzzy
08-Dec-17
I'm with GED, move along. If you already asked me and I politely told you no, next time you knock on my door and ask again. I'm not going to be so polite.

Not taking no for an answer could really piss someone off.

From: Jebediah
08-Dec-17
Strategy for repeat inquiries: if they initially say they've "already got a guy," stop again in two years to "see if anything has changed." This hasn't worked for me per se, but has in each instance been met with a polite response. If initially they were a flat out "no," stop back in 2 (possibly 3) years, explain that although they previously said "no" a couple years ago, you're stopping back for a second and final time to see if their view had changed. People's views do, in fact, change. Even as adults. Emphasis on "final," so they know you're not going to bug them forever. I would never ask more than twice.

From: Pi
09-Dec-17
Pondboy. It is hard to know what is in the persons mind .

Perhaps if you went back and said you have an idea that may benefit both of you . Since you are hunting just beyond his property anyway ... Offer to post his land for him and keep an eye on it , Offer to give him a report as to what may be going on ... Your the good guy willing to be his lookout etc. That is, If you can walk around with his permission. Remind him that there is no liability and that you are very ethical and careful.

From: pondboy
09-Dec-17
all good ideas, i think that i will offer him some venison/ help around the property as a kind gesture. Then possibly bring up hunting it again in the early summer if it seems reasonable

From: Jebediah
09-Dec-17
Sorry to belabor this, but I have a couple more thoughts. If you bang on someone's door a second time in quick succession, after being told "no," they're going to be annoyed and it will be counterproductive, regardless of what your proposal is. The only option with these folks is to play the long game--go back in a couple years. And in the mean time, keep an eye open in case a real estate sign goes up on their property. Second--the "I'll watch your property" idea could be (mistakenly) perceived as a threat, I would be careful with that.

From: Pi
09-Dec-17
I don't think it will go that way Jeb It won't be said as a leg breaker would say it . No shakedown attitude . It is a proposal of service , a benefit, for the privileged of using their land. Another set of eyes . The Devil you know angle.

Its Just a nice gesture and added benefit of having someone out back there. Like a private security guard . My recent Land owner was into that when I asked how I should handle any unexpected visitors to his property. Just say it nicely and accept no if it is still no. Ask If you can come back sometime to ask again . Some people like that persistence and if they don't then you will get that message . No harm in asking.

I have turned around antis with dialogue , sensitive to the best interest of land management and fair chase , natural food and solid ethics.

You miss every shot you don't take. W. Gretzky

From: Jebediah
09-Dec-17
It's probably all in the delivery. The devil's in the details. Probably best to leave the baseball bat at home when having that conversation.

From: Pi
10-Dec-17
Agreed.

No dark shades , No flashing the weapons , No backup toughies in hoodies a' blasting loud in the Ghetto ride , No quick movement or hand sign that regular folk may take offense to. Don't be looking over the mans shoulder and pointing ... Best to keep foul language and off subjects in check and don't mention his family , pets or well being... Did I miss any ? There must be more to add...

You said it brother , Its All in the delivery !

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