Moultrie Products
Work Ethic
Community
Contributors to this thread:
Will 04-Jan-19
K Cummings 04-Jan-19
Mike the Carpenter 04-Jan-19
Mike the Carpenter 04-Jan-19
Woods Walker 04-Jan-19
K Cummings 04-Jan-19
Spike Bull 04-Jan-19
Will 04-Jan-19
Mike the Carpenter 04-Jan-19
Brotsky 04-Jan-19
Grey Ghost 04-Jan-19
TGbow 04-Jan-19
HDE 04-Jan-19
Jeff Durnell 04-Jan-19
KSflatlander 04-Jan-19
JTV 04-Jan-19
Mike the Carpenter 04-Jan-19
Mike the Carpenter 04-Jan-19
HDE 04-Jan-19
Salagi 04-Jan-19
Salagi 04-Jan-19
KSflatlander 04-Jan-19
Woods Walker 04-Jan-19
TD 05-Jan-19
From: Will
04-Jan-19
Hopefully this is apolitical and just good old fashioned fun.

I almost tagged it to KPC's cool immigration discussion thread, but didnt want to run that off the rails.

Work ethic, is it fading, or are times just changing and the whole "gig" economy thing and what not just makes work look different?

I started working when I was a kid. I'd rake leaves and shovel snow for several neighbors. When deemed old enough to mow, I added that and did brush cutting for a local xmas tree farm as well. Then added working at a local "general store". In college during the early/mid 90's I started the leading edge of the business I've built and worked since 1999. It's tiny compared to many businesses. My annual gross is less than many, even small, companies need a week. But I've worked by tail off to build it and that feels great!

That's not bragging. Honestly, my mission the past two years is to reduce that, dramatically improve my efficiency and slow it down a bit. I've got more important things that need more focus (my family). But as KPC said on his thread... How many younger folks today are willing to do the dirty work?

Are they willing to grind? I'm sure some are... But on average?

Are people willing to work, or are they assuming they should: "be there" right out of school?

Curious how you all feel about work ethic and expectations that you see out there around the country today.

From: K Cummings
04-Jan-19
"How many younger folks today are willing to do the dirty work?

Are they willing to grind? I'm sure some are... But on average?"

In my opinion, there are a LOT more of them out there than you think. You just don't hear much from them because they are actually out there "grinding." I see them every day.

Quite frankly people who are out there actually building their own American dream have neither the time or the desire to b**ch about being passed by.

KPC

04-Jan-19

Mike the Carpenter's embedded Photo
Mike the Carpenter's embedded Photo
A friend called me last night and said he just bought a whole bison yesterday morning and had no idea what to do next, but it was hanging from his tractor in the barn right now. I took the hint (PLEASE HELP ME OUT OF THIS MESS). Took my boys over there and showed the 3 of them that it is no different than a deer, just a LOT bigger. I had him lower the beast, got the hide started down over the rump then let the boys take over and finished it. Now THAT is how to spend time out of school.

What impressed me the most most is my boys weren’t afraid to jump in and get the work done. My wife and I have taught them to not think about problems, but instead always to find a solution...no matter what, ALWAYS have a solution. I faked a hand cramp issue and said I couldn’t go on, so they said they wanted to finish. Their solution last night was to just work and do what Dad did. Please excuse the proud Dad moment.

04-Jan-19

Mike the Carpenter's embedded Photo
Mike the Carpenter's embedded Photo
I know there is at least 2 good “Up and Coming” kids out there.

From: Woods Walker
04-Jan-19
Gettin' HUNGRY!!!

From: K Cummings
04-Jan-19
You have every right to be proud Mike.

I might be wrong but something tells me your boys won't have much trouble finding work and making their way in the world.

If that's the case, you've done your job.

KPC

04-Jan-19
Cool! Enjoy the moment, Mike.

From: Will
04-Jan-19
Mike that's awesome!

And...

KPC - I love what you noted, I sure hope that's the case! It's positive to think about for sure!

04-Jan-19
Thank you guys. As most everyone knows, that is the best things said that you could ever hear about your kids. They will definitely remember the stuff we do compared to what “score” they otherwise would have gotten on some game.

I’m typing this as my oldest is driving us to his Friday night job of washing dishes for the local Sportsman’s Club Fish Fry. It’s the only job there that pays, because quite honestly the job sucks. It’s the only way to get someone to do it.

From: Brotsky
04-Jan-19
Well done Mike!

I have a 19 year old daughter who works 2 jobs to have enough money to make her car and insurance payments while she goes to college. I bought her first car and she wrecked it through bad decisions. She knew she would have to buy the second one and make the payments/insurance. She works her butt off to make that happen and it has taught her a great lesson. Working two jobs and on the dean's list every semester. She will do well in life.

My second daughter is 17, she is one of the hardest working kids I know. Goes to conditioning in the AM and gymnastics in the PM, does all sorts of chores for her aging grandmother, and works part time at a local restaurant. I get notes all the time from the restaurant owner about how strong of a worker she is. She also has a 4.0 gpa. I know many of her friends that do the same.

I strongly echo what Kevin said earlier. There's a whole bunch of good kids out there keeping their heads down and working hard. They are too busy licing their lives to worry about making noise in the media or on social media chasing so called social justices. I have a lot of faith in them, however I just hope our elected officials stay out of the way of these hard working kids achieving their dreams while the slackers get the handouts and hand ups because of the noise they make!

From: Grey Ghost
04-Jan-19
You should be very proud, Mike and Brotsky. Thanks for sharing.

Will, on average I'd say there are fewer kids willing to do the dirty work, and more kids willing to cling to their parents teats longer. That's what's changed the most from my perspective. My friends and I couldn't wait to graduate high school and get out from under our parent's control. Nowadays, many kids are willing to live off their parents well into their 20s and even 30s. That's just odd to me.

Matt

From: TGbow
04-Jan-19
I see a bad trend of laziness in the workplace, especially where I work. I joke at work sometimes about bringing my 14 yr old daughter to work to show some the guys how to work. I'm not saying everybody is like that but there is a problem today for sure. It's like they think they are entitled to a check.

When my son graduated from Parris Island 12 hrs ago, his drill sergeant made a comment to me that I must have done something right with my son. I replied, he didn't have a choice. Personally, laziness is hard for me to tolerate.

From: HDE
04-Jan-19
Work ethic only means you value work to get something else, in essence, there is no free lunch.

How you do it is an entirely different thing. Busting your butt or breaking your back doing hard labor related things doesn't mean your work ethic is any different (or better) than someone who performs neuro-surgury, designs bridges, or manages someone's portfolio at a young adults age.

It also doesn't mean working 60 hrs a week and getting paid for 40 on a regular basis then exclaiming " they have a good work ethic".

When I was a field engineer in oil and gas services, I often worked 60 to 70 hrs a week and slept many nights in the cab of a pickup while the drilling rig ran casing and got paid for 40. That wasn't a good work ethic, that was plain dumb...

From: Jeff Durnell
04-Jan-19
I've worked maintenance in a steel mill for 23 years, and worked residential construction before that. I've always taken pride in learning and earning the skills needed to do my jobs properly. We were raised to be motivated, work hard, and do our share. Until recently, this is how acquaintances and coworkers I've known have conducted themselves. Unfortunately, these values don't seem to be nearly as frequent in the next generation. There has been a sizable shift in work ethic, and an increased sense of entitlement. The company I work for has a hard time hiring folks now, and a surprisingly large percentage of applicants fail the drug test. Many of those who make it in don't want to work, call in sick all the time, don't care to learn, don't want to apply themselves, don't care whether they're competent at the job they're being paid to do. On top of that, they're whiners like you wouldn't believe, want babied, and have no shame. It's sad. I'd like to visit their fathers and kick em right in the ass.... with my good leg. Now I need to go put ice on the other. Yeah, we need to legalize pot, maybe that'll help :^/

From: KSflatlander
04-Jan-19
Mike, Brotsky, TGbow- you all are obviously good dads and should be proud.

I was raised blue collar and dad pounded into my head that if your not 5 minutes early then you’re late. Also, if he wasn’t jawing at me then I was doing good. The baby boomers weren’t much for positive reinforcement. Dad always said why do I need to pat your back for doing what you’re paid to do...lol.

With that said I manage 17 millennials. Of course I started managing with my dads philosophy but you all know how that might of worked. I wouldn’t say it’s a white collar job being a biologist but most of my employees have masters degrees. I adapted a bit and stopped with being an 8-5 clock watcher because it didn’t work with them. I switch my management style up and the culture is results driven. I give them 3 things: deadline, budget, and scope. The rest of the details are up to them. As long as they deliver on time, under budget, and it’s what I asked for it’s all good. If they get done early then take Friday off. I give a lot of positive feedback for behavior I want repeated and negative feedback when necessary. I don’t care when they come to work and I don’t babysit. They like it and it works. Actually I like it because they find more ownship in the work and I don’t have to do a lot of hand holding.

I got 5 kids. One boy couldn’t find an oil dipstick on a car it his life depended on it. But he will graduate from college with a +3.5. His brother is putting front and back ford 3/4 axles on a Jeep and changing engines. I can’t even do that. He learns from YouTube...lol. I got a daughter who can kill and skin a deer with best of them and the other daughter graduated college and is totally self sufficient. They were all raise in the same house and culture. They are all over the board but they all have a good work ethic. They just each have thier own style. Go figure.

From: JTV
04-Jan-19
I worked as a kid... mowing lawns, Skinning in the fur shed for a fur buyer, trapping to make my own cash ... I worked on a buddies farm milking cattle and cleaning stalls thru Jr. high and early high school .... was on my own right after graduation in '76, moved out of the house, or me and my dad would killed one of the other and I went into the USMC ( I worked as a gas jockey or at an amusement park in the mean time)... been on my own ever since ...... my parents wouldnt let any of us (myself and sisters) skip school or call off sick, dad never missed work, he was a overhead crane man/senior operator in the Sheet&Tin at US Steel for 40 years.... very seldom have I ever called off work, a few time with the flu, but never to just "call off" and go party so to speak .... the only time my parents let me miss school other than true sickness, was opening day trapping so I could set traps .... in the last 7 years, Ive missed 5 days work, and that was due to the flu or the truck breaking down....

04-Jan-19

Mike the Carpenter's embedded Photo
Mike the Carpenter's embedded Photo
As I type this, he is trying to get the pile down so he can gobble down some dinner so he doesn’t have to stay so late tonight cleaning up the place.

04-Jan-19

From: HDE
04-Jan-19
KSflatlander - I too had to switch styles when supervising 20 something year olds. "Millennials" have been raised different, no use trying to change them. All you can do is encourage the best talents and skill sets they have and don't lose sleep over the rest.

From: Salagi
04-Jan-19
I grew up on a farm back in the 60's and 70's. So you decide if I learned how to work or not. ;) My kids were raised to work and have gone on to be hard workers (both girls, both married less than a year, 28 and 26 years old).

My wife now works at a well known dept store, goes in early, stays late trying to get her job done often off the clock. Technically she is a supervisor, (although they give it a different name), but she runs everything from cash registers to doing the manager's job (since that lady takes a lot of time off). One of her duties is hiring. I cannot tell you the number of times she has hired someone and they do not even bother to show up for their first day on the job. Quite often others quit after working there a while without any notice and often without even bothering to tell anyone they quit, they just don't bother to show up. That blows my mind. The last time I quit a job was 19 years ago last month and I gave them 2 weeks notice and offered to come in during Christmas break to help out, (I was leaving a hardware store to start teaching school in the middle of the year).

Some of the classes I've taught in the last few years have given me the opportunity to talk about interviews, work ethics, and being a good worker in general. I wish I could spend more time on those subjects to help the kids learn, but it really needs to start long before I get them in junior high and high school, it needs to start at home.

From: Salagi
04-Jan-19

Salagi's embedded Photo
Salagi's embedded Photo
Salagi's embedded Photo
Salagi's embedded Photo
All to often this is what my wife runs into - if she's lucky.

From: KSflatlander
04-Jan-19
Great post and perspective HDE. Never thought about it that way.

From: Woods Walker
04-Jan-19
Mike: You have some good kids there and you taught 'em well. Look out world, here they come! My bet is that they too will pass it on.

What's sad though, is that they should be the NORM, and not the exception. I, like many of the other posters here, grew up doing these exact same kind of things and it was just what you did. Pick, shovel, skin, shovel poop, build fence, sweat, freeze, get wet...whatever had to be done. It builds character!

From: TD
05-Jan-19

TD's embedded Photo
TD's embedded Photo
It's mostly about commitment.......

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