Snuffer Sharpening Made E-Z
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Contributors to this thread:
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
codfish 21-Dec-07
4wapati@home 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
BB 21-Dec-07
LH 22-Dec-07
Bushbow 22-Dec-07
BB 22-Dec-07
Westslope 22-Dec-07
CVR-N-GRND@home 22-Dec-07
Beendare 22-Dec-07
hyrax 22-Dec-07
LH 22-Dec-07
mikesohm/magnus 22-Dec-07
BB 22-Dec-07
hyrax 22-Dec-07
Gray Ghost 22-Dec-07
hyrax 22-Dec-07
bb 22-Dec-07
Gray Ghost 22-Dec-07
David Alford 22-Dec-07
Gray Ghost 23-Dec-07
LH 23-Dec-07
BB 23-Dec-07
Steamin 23-Dec-07
Buckstopshere 23-Dec-07
Gray Ghost 23-Dec-07
midwest 23-Dec-07
Shrewski 23-Dec-07
Greywolf 24-Dec-07
TomL 24-Dec-07
Gray Ghost 24-Dec-07
BB 24-Dec-07
Gray Ghost 24-Dec-07
yleecoyote23 25-Dec-07
David Alford 26-Dec-07
David Alford 26-Dec-07
bb 26-Dec-07
Bowfreak 27-Dec-07
BB 27-Dec-07
BB 27-Dec-07
Scoot 27-Dec-07
bb 27-Dec-07
Bowfreak 27-Dec-07
David Alford 27-Dec-07
BB 27-Dec-07
David Alford 27-Dec-07
David Alford 27-Dec-07
David Alford 27-Dec-07
Steamin 28-Dec-07
David Alford 28-Dec-07
Mystic Arrow 01-Jan-08
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Bou'bound 15-Jul-08
Ermine 17-Jul-08
Heat 17-Jul-08
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From: BB
21-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
A number of years back I posted a thread to help those interested in getting their snuffers razor sharp. I found a foldere with the pictures I used and the old thread so I will copy and past the thread and repost the pictures.

I've had a number of Bowsiters ask me to do this in the past year or two, so here goes. I might say that this method will work on the snuffer ss's and similar heads that allow you to lay your three blades broadhead flat.

I'll try to make this as simple as it really is.

Before starting let me just say that I have been shooting and sharpening snuffers for over 20 years. I am sure there are a few ways to sharpen snuffers that I haven't tired, but I really can't think of any. I used the file method, the grinder, the sand paper, the carbon sharpening stones, Arkansas stones, etc. You name it, I think I have tired them all. Through all the trails and tribulations, the following method is the one I found to be the easiest and it gets the snuffers sharper than any method I have ever tired. I could go in great detail explaining the reasons I no longer use a file, or the reason I will never put a snuffer to a grinding wheel again and so forth and so on. Like I mentioned, at least for me, the method I use at present is the best and easiest I have been able to get the snuffers razor sharp.

The picture above is an array of some of the stones I used along the way. One can see I spent quite a bit of money experimenting. Now, I only use two stones to get the job done. I showed the array of stones and will explain a little bit about sizes and the reasons for different stones. But in reality a person only needs to purchase two stones and to start out, you can get by with just one. I will explain that a little later in my series of posts.

From: BB
21-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
Before I start to sharpen any snuffer, I always check to make sure the insert is properly seated in the ferrule of the broadhead and spins true with no wobble what so ever. If you want your snuffer to fly like a dart, it is paramount to have a heavy enough spine, and have the snuffer spinning true to the arrow spin. Without this, you will not get proper flight. It is also important to have your bow in tune. I am not going into that stuff, but mention it because of it ultimate importance.

Okay now we are ready to sharpen a snuffer. Like mentioned in my first post, I use two stones. The first stone I use is the large yellow DMT diamond steel shown at the bottom of my first posts picture.

It is 4" wide and 10 inches long. I purchased it from Bob of Helle Knives. I am sure he can tell those interested where one like that can be picked up. I just got this stone about a year ago. DMT color codes their stones and although this is a two sided stone, I just use the black side, or the very rough side. It removes material very fast. From package to the finishing stone I can do the process in about 3 minutes per broadhead.

The picture above shows a snuffer and its factory grind. We are now ready to make it hunting and razor sharp.

From: BB
21-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
If you have only one stone, then the process is exactly the same, it will just take longer and more strokes to get your snuffer razor sharp.

I take a snuffer that is turning true and set it on the stone. One side of the snuffer with be sticking up and grab that with my thumb and fingers. I then move the snuffer from the back of the stone. long wise to front. I then drag it back. I do this cutting off excess material for 30 strokes. I count each full stroke I do. If I do thirty, it really is 60 as I count only a full repetition.(forward and backward). Once I have done this I rotate the head 120 degrees. and repeat the process the same number of counted strokes until I have done all three blades. I then look at the blades in the light and you can see the material you have removed. At this point you can also still see some of the factory grind. I continue this procedure until I have removed all the factory grind from the back of the head to its point and on all three sides.

The picture on this post shows where the diamond steel has removed part of the factory grind, but also shows that remaining. Look close at this picture and the one that preceded it in the last post. The second picture shows a snuffer that has about ½ the factory grind removed. You continue this operation until ALL the factory grind is removed and all edges come together. Once this is done you are ready to got to the finishing stone.

From: BB
21-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
Continue removing the factory grind until all edges come together. As you pick up and look at the edges of the snuffer it will become readily apparent what I mean when I say "edges come together". It is important to get all edges to come together from side to side and back to point. Like mentioned in the last post, once this is done, the hard work is over and the razor edge can now be achieved.

The picture on this post shows the stone, the snuffer and the way I grab and push from rear to front along the length of the stone.

From: BB
21-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
I use moderate to heavy pressure when removing the factory grind on the rough (black) stone. Always try to keep the pressure the same through any three sided repetition and always do the same number of strokes per side. That way you are always keeping the broadhead to its original configuration. That does not happen with filing or using a wheel. That is one of the main reasons I like to use this method over the others as it keeps the broadhead perfectly balanced. And you will never effect it temper by this method.

This picture with this post shows all the factory grind removed on the rough stone and it is now ready for the finishing stone.

Note the grind marks removed, and that all edges come together, there are no dips, and it runs the full length of the broadhead from back to point. And you have removed the same amount of material from all sides. And all edges are perfectly flat because you use the stone and broadhead itself as your built in guide. Again, not so with grinding or filing.

From: BB
21-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
Okay, we are ready to get the edge razor sharp.

For this I use the very finest diamond steel. I suggest you don't purchase the short ones, but spend a bit more and get the 2 1/2" x 11 1/2". I got mine about 6 years ago and its better today than when it was new. I think I paid about $70.00 for it at the Woodcraft store. I know most of the stones shown can be purchased over the internet for less money. Just make sure you are getting the proper stone before ordering.

The picture with this post shows that stone and the final touches to getting a razor sharp snuffer.

At this point, I just push the snuffer from the back to the front of the stone. I lift it up and come back until I have done it 4 times, counting the number on each side. Then I do it 3 times, then 2 times and then finally a series of one time. 1-2-3 1-2-3 1-2-3 going very lightly the full length of the stone on each side, picking it up and starting from the back and moving forward each time. Soon you will hear a smooth, soft sound and you will gain a feel and an ear and know when the head is done.

Use light strokes with very little pressure now. You are not trying to remove material now, you are honing a sharp edge. It does not take pressure, just some light strokes. In no time it is shaving sharp. Even the a person who has no talent at sharpening things, can use this method and get a razor sharp head.

From: BB
21-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
And now the test. Will it readily shave hair.

The picture with post show me shaving my arm with an arrow I pulled from my bow quiver. In a large picture you can plainly see the hair and hopefully in this one you will be able to at least see the hair missing from my arm.

I can take a factory head, once spin tested, and have it razor sharp in less than five minutes using the method and stone shown in the above method.

From that point on it takes just a few strokes to keep it sharp. I re sharpen my snuffers about every other day when I'm hunting, unless its wet and I do them each day.

From: BB
21-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
Well it’s time to go kill a critter. The same head I showed in the last post, is the same head I used to take this Colorado bull a few weeks back. It's been re-sharpened and is my number one arrow waiting to do its job all over again. I know some folks here at the Bowsite are turned off by my avocation of snuffers. But snuffers really do have a magic that can't be explained, it must be experienced. So for those of you I offend, I beg your pardon. But some of you who want a better way, a faster, cleaner kill, with better blood trails most of the time, please give snuffers a try. They, more than any piece of equipment in bowhunting, have proven their worth time and time again. And to the many bowhunters I have influenced to try snuffers, most have thanked me and say they too, have witnessed the magic of which I speak. And now I will be glad to answer any questions or help any of you in any way I can. See how easy it really is!!!!!

Have a great bowhunt. BB

From: BB
21-Dec-07
It is not necessary to get either the black stone, or the finest diamond steel. If you are pressed for money, I would suggest the blue stone, its the fourth one down from the top on my first post. I go it at Woodcraft for about %60.00. It cuts fairly fast, and yet with light pressure I can get my heads shaving sharp. If I only used the one stone, then I would get a piece of plate glass and glue a nice piece of soft leather to it and back stroke my heads to get the final sharpness necessary. That is not necessary if finished with the super fine diamond steel.

I will challenge anyone to a snuffer sharpening contest. My method-against yours. There is none better! And as Will Sonnet used to say on the old TV western show------ "No brag, just fact."

Have a great bowhunt. BB

From: codfish
21-Dec-07
Wow. That is incredible how easy it is. Guess what BH will be my first to use.

Codfish

From: 4wapati@home
21-Dec-07
Thanks Bill, I've been wanting a copy of that post for a long time. I'm going to print it out this time. Now how about reposting your cadillac treestand post. I'd love to get those instructions, and see those pics again. Thanks!

From: BB
21-Dec-07
Since I wrote this, a few things have changed. Snuffer SS's have appeared on the scene, and Magnus just keeps improving their product and making them easier to sharpen. This method works great for the SS’s but you won’t need the coarse steel to sharpen them from the factory, but it does come in handy if you hit something with one and really dull an edge.

At this point in time I think a guy could purchase one double sided DMT steel and be set for life. In fact I just purchased a friend one for his Christmas present that is coarse (one step down from the black one(extra coarse) shown in the post where I was removing the grind). The other side is extra fine. I purchased it from Woodcraft and it ran $120.00 with free shipping.

You can also use these steels to sharpen your knives, and many other tools. I don't know how I could get along without one, now that I’ve had one.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. BB

From: BB
21-Dec-07
Jeff, I tried to send you those pictures to the email address you sent me, but they came back. I pm ed you but have not heard back. Send an email to ballard4416@msn.com and I will reply to it and attach those pictures.

Have a great bowhunt. BB

From: LH
22-Dec-07
Someone may have said this, but take a magic marker and paint the cutting edges. This will allow you to see where you have removed the material and let you know if you are putting too much pressure on front or back.

Only problem I have with snuffers is their long length makes them weak and prone to bending. Find Montecs to be much tougher, just harder to sharpen and I think thats because the steel is harder.

From: Bushbow
22-Dec-07
I have used the same/similar method for years w/Snuffs and Wensel Woodsmans. Only thing I did different is ad water for lubrication with the diamond stones. I have found it makes the process even quicker and it prolongs the life of the stones.

PS. If you can't afford or don't want to drop the coin on the diamond stones just yet you can ge similar results(speed and sharpness) using a smooth piece of tile, some spray adhesive and a few different grits of WET/DRY sand paper. Be sure to use water with this method as well.

Good thread

Bob Urban

From: BB
22-Dec-07
"Only problem I have with snuffers is their long length makes them weak and prone to bending."

I've been shooting snuffers since the early 80's and I beg to differ with you on that statement. In fact there's not many, if any heads, stronger or more stable than is the snuffer design. And the length adds to it ability to penetrate better. I think the old 100 grain snuffers, because they were smaller and had less steel had a tendency to bend, if they hit something very hard, but the bigger ones, which I use, are as tough as they come. The new snuffer ss's are as tough as they come too.

I've used water before and I know there are lots of ways to skin a cat, but I prefer to use the dry method after trying it both ways. With either method they sharpen razor sharp in no time.

I've tried sharpening snuffers in everyway imaginable. For several years I did the sandpaper method, but it does not compare to the edge one can get with a good, fine, diamond steel. At least that was my observation.

Have a great bowhunt. BB

From: Westslope
22-Dec-07
If your going to use wet/dry sand paper nothing will give you a smoother surface than a piece of glass. The wife may not appreciate chunks of sandpaper glued to the picture window in the living room so I suggest you either do it in the garage or go to your glass shop and get a piece for a couple bucks. Now if you really want to tick her off her hand held and travel mirrors will also work perfectly.

22-Dec-07

CVR-N-GRND@home's embedded Photo
CVR-N-GRND@home's embedded Photo
Here is a picture of a little testing of my own on the strength of a Snuffer ( Some may think why I would do such a thing, but I wanted to see myself)

This was a Montec G5 and Snuffer shot at a concrete wall 3 years ago.

Thanks again BB for turning me on to Snuffers years ago! In my opinion I dont believe there is a better BH on the market. (Although I am VERY impressed with the SS)

I sharpen the same way BB does and it is a very slick and simple process.

From: Beendare
22-Dec-07
I made the mistake of buying the short G5 stone. good for field touch up but BB is dead on with those longer stones- much easier.

From: hyrax
22-Dec-07
was turned on to Snuffers back in 1986 by a bowhunting buddy. Back then they were bigger and heavier. I was also lucky enough to get my hands on some of the original Rothhaar snuffers that Roger used to hand braze in his basement. These were about 220 grains out of the package. Boy did they make a hole. I use the 160 grain heads now and replace them when they get down below 150 grains.

Above someone posted that the longer length makes them weaker. Perhaps, as BB noted, on the 100 grain model the heads bend but the heavier ones are tough as they get. If they make a tougher head they are keeping it for themselves; I sure haven’t seen it.

WARNING: Strongly biased editorial below

Along with the many other compromises that I personally think today’s bowhunter makes with the business end of their arrows (e.g. dull heads, mechanical failures, punch-then-cut, light arrow weight), I rank cutting length right up there. Everyone focuses on cutting diameter and neglects length. This is a mistake – IMHO.

After all, you wouldn’t cut your bread with an Exacto-Knife or skin your deer with just a razor blade would you? Snuffers have always left an exit wound that was significantly larger than the cutting diameter of the head (which, by the way, is about 1½” on the 160 grain model). That is completely due to the length of a sharp blade. On the other hand, I’ve seen some heads actually produce exit wounds that were less than the diameter of the head. That’s not good. I believe a dull head with short blades is the culprit here.

I prefer the Fred Bear filed edge serrations over a clean sharp edge. I feel that the blade retains its cutting characteristics better as it passes through bone and tissue when its serrated than it does when it’s a clean edge. I rank head dullness on its ability to hold an edge through the entire shot on an animal. It should still be sharp when you pick it up after the hit. My Snuffers always are.

On another note, the three blade design puts the Snuffer over the top. Once, after a tough lessen in carelessness, my doctor explained the difficultly in closing a wound that is created by a 3 bladed object. After what it took for him to repair my Snuffer skewered hand, he tried to convince me to use a two bladed head because the wound is easier to close. Since then, I’ve never considered using 2-bladed head – the purpose of the head is to make a wound that doesn’t close.

So to me, a Snuffer is right up there with the wheel when it comes to design perfection.

From: LH
22-Dec-07
BB, the weaknesses I have experienced are two broken welds at the back of the blade where it joins the ferule and if the long cutting edge hits something hard such as front leg bone.

Seems to bend the blade in slightly. Have to remove a lot of metal to get it sharpened when that happens. Really shows up with the Magic Marker.

22-Dec-07
cvrgrind i wish you would have also shot a snuffer ss into the concrete i think you would have been amazed between the difference in strength with the montec.

bb you are one heck of a bowhunter and a man. I am not just saying that because we own the snuffer, i am saying that because your selflessness shows on how you help bowhunters everyday. Thank you so much bb for taking the time to show bowhunters an ease of sharpening. By the way your items are on the way to you, we had a backorder. Thanks again and merry xmas to everyone!!

From: BB
22-Dec-07
CRV-N-GRND, it looks to me like you bounced those broadheads off your dad's head. You know his head is harder than concrete :-) Wish your parents our best when you see then on Christmas.

Mike, did you mean bb or BB? I know your machine doesn't capitalize anything so its got me confused :-)

LH in all the years I have shot snuffers, that has never happened one time to me. There have been rare occasions where I have bent a blade or two by hitting something hard, but never once have I broken the braze. I did have several of the original Roothaar snuffers where the braze broke while practicing, but never on a critter.

And I can tell by the sound of the blades on a steel if one is bent or not as soon as I start to sharpen them. After a while you just get a "feel" and an "ear" for when they are razor sharp.

In the old days, when I first started using snuffers, I shot many critters with the factory grind. It's a very rough edge as is the edge achieved by filing. I know it kills and cuts, but not nearly as well as does a razor edge and here's why.

Any cut made on tissue with a rough edge makes a jagged cut if examined under a microscope. When blood clots, tiny string like pieces called fibrin strands hook on the cuts edges and stop blood from flowing. The rougher the edge, the easier it is for a body to stop the bleeding.

Let's take for example you cut your self with a rough piece of tin. It hurts like heck, and is cut deep, but it usually doesn't bleed that much as the fibrin grab onto the rough edges and stops the blood flow.

Now take a very sharp razor blade and just nick yourself while shaving, and it bleeds like a stuck pig. The reason for that is the fibrin strands have little or no edges to grab onto and thus the blood keeps flowing and clotting is delayed.

The same thing happens when we hunt and in identical hits the sharper head leaves a smoother surface on the cut it makes thus retarding the clotting process. That's why I prefer the razor sharp edge vs. the filed edge.

The rough edge might feel sharper after having gone through a critter, than a razor edge does, but it is what it does in the critter that really counts and not how it feels after its done its job.

Have a great bowhunt. BB

From: hyrax
22-Dec-07
I would never endorse using the factory grind! I use a fine mill bastard file to produce a micro-serrated edge. They shave hair when I'm done.

I used to sharpen my Snuffers to clean razor edge but noticed after shooting a deer that it wasn't sharp -- couldn't shave hair. That got me thinking: when did the head go dull? Right after it pierce through the hide or cut through a rib? Before it got to some of the tough, rubbery arteries in the boiler room?

On the other hand, with a finely filed edge I am still able to shave the hair from my arm after shooting through a deer. Plus the serrations grab tissue rather than deflect it.

I think Fred Bear had this one right (hard to argue with Fred). Perhaps you could argue that a serrated edge doesn't start out quite as sharp as a smooth edge but it also doesn't go dull as quick. ;0)

From: Gray Ghost
22-Dec-07
Can anyone tell me what variety of steel they use for the Snuffers, and the hardness it's tempered to?

It appears to be a fairly soft (low Rockwell) steel.

GG

From: hyrax
22-Dec-07
High carbon knife grade steel. Minimum 44 on the Rockwell C scale. That equates to around 450 on the Brinell hardness scale.

400 on the Brinell scale requires high pressure to file, at 500 a file removes almost no material, and at 600 the material cannot be filed (roughly 58 on the Rockwell C scale).

The hardness equates to about a 1040 Tool Steel (also used in knife making once in a while) or a 440 stainless (Brinell scale) for example.

On occasion, I've had to anneal them a bit just to be able to sharpen them. Meaning they were probably up in the 55 range on the Rockwell C scale.

From: bb
22-Dec-07
"Mike, did you mean bb or BB? I know your machine doesn't capitalize anything so its got me confused :-)"

BB we know who he means:)

I have been shooting the SS for a couple of years now and I really like them. I sharpen them the same way BB describes and they will shave hair easily. I find them to be extremely tough also. The other bb

From: Gray Ghost
22-Dec-07
"The hardness equates to about a 1040 Tool Steel (also used in knife making once in a while) or a 440 stainless (Brinell scale) for example."

There is no standard hardness that "equates" to a specific steel. Most steels perform best within a certain range, but it all depends on how it's heat treated. For instance, 440C is often tempered to 60 Rockwell, or higher, in knives.

A 44 Rockwell hardness is considered very soft by quality knife standards. If that's what is used, then that explains why the Snuffers are so easy to sharpen and tend to bend instead of break when they hit something hard.

It also means their edge retention is quite low relative to most quality knife blades...hence BB needing to sharpen his so often when he's hunting.

GG

From: David Alford
22-Dec-07
BB, try moving the Snuffer side to side so the stone is contacting the blade at close to a 90 degree attack. Do the same procedure as you otherwise described & compare.

You may also wish to try the XBLOCK with the stones set at a more acute angle than flat. Then finish with the Simmons Wheelie sharpener.

Pls. let me know your results with these 2 options. davidleealford@aol.com

From: Gray Ghost
23-Dec-07
" I don't know why some would resort to comparing broadheads to knives..."

Gee, I don't know, maybe because they're both instruments intended to cut thru hair, hide, flesh, and sometimes bone. Call me silly.

"Most stainless broadhead blades on the market you will find below 50 and some below 40 on the C scale."

Yep, and that's precisely why nobody has separated themselves as a clear leader in the industry. Generally speaking, they're all made out of the same crap steels using the same poor forging methods. They're designed to be a disposable product, for the most part. I agree, Magnus is better than most, but there's still a LOT of room for improvement, IMO.

BTW, did you happen to notice the specs on the Silver Flame blades? 440 stainless steel hardened to 55-57RC and a .071" thickness. I wish they made a 3-blade.

Actually, the ideal broadhead, IMO, would be a milled, one-piece design of roughly the same dimensions as the Snuffer, only slightly thicker blades. It would be made of O1 tool steel, or possibly D2, treated to about 55-58RC...just like my favorite knives.

GG

From: LH
23-Dec-07
BB, I seriously doubt I could hear the sounds you describe. Time has done that. I also don't remember how I broke the welds on the snuffers. Still have one of them in MT. I don't like the three blades for elk since I shoot trad and have found the two blade is far better for penetration.

I smacked Montecs into serious bone on bou this past year and you didn't really need to sharpen them after I pulled them out.

Both work just great if we do our job but there is no doubt the snuffer has a shallower cut angle and will probably penetrate a bit better.

From: BB
23-Dec-07
"It also means their edge retention is quite low relative to most quality knife blades...hence BB needing to sharpen his so often when he's hunting."

GG the difference between a knife and a broadhead is the difference between and wide angle lens and a telephoto lens. Both basically do the same thing (knives and broadheads cut, and both type of lens help take pictures) but in much different manner and with a much different purpose and out come.

A knife, because of its intended purpose, needs to be able to hold an edge a lot longer than does a broadhead. My broadhead only needs to stay sharp long enough to go through a critter. That would be 6 feet at the max and more often than not, only 3 feet. The reason I sharpen my broadheads so often, is I like them to be sharp all the time, plus I like to sharpen them. I do it in respect for the animal and to insure when I hit something I have the sharpest head possible. How often do you sharpen yours?

Matt I'm an old man now, but when I was young and going to college I worked in a blacksmith shop to earn money to help put myself through college. It just so happened I was just a blacksmith helper, but ended up working for the best blacksmith in a large shop. We annealed and tempered a lot of steel in a lot of different ways, using many different types of steel and many different substances with which to temper, from powder, oils, salt brine solutions etc.

I ask this guy a lot of questions, and although I don't know near as much as Woody or Mike about making broadheads, or even tempering them, I did learn a bit about tempering when I worked in the blacksmith shop. Each tool and each type of steel has its own characteristics and needs and when tempered, they have to consider the use of that item.

Knives, although they cut the same type tissue as broadheads, do it under entirely different circumstance and that has to be considered in the tempering process.

From your statement it sounds like you want people to think the reason broadheads are tempered to rockwell 45 is to save money as that's the cheap way. That statement is just absurd. For the same cost they could be hardened considerably, if a harder temper was needed or what was best for the product. Time has proven, for its specific use, that to be the best hardness. It has nothing to do with saving a few pennies or being cheap as you infer. And one of Magnus's main goals is continually improve their products. And it seems funny to me that they would have a lifetime warranty on any, as you say "disposable product".

David, believe me, I have sharpened snuffers for many years. I‘ve tried doing them in every way imaginable, including like you suggest and have found that the way I do them now is the fastest and the heads come out the sharpest. I do acknowledge there are more than one way to skin a cat and what works great for one might not be best for someone else. I would suggest that those learning try each way and judge for themselves.

I will make this challenge to anyone. Let’s take a regular snuffer, with the old grind, an I will bet anyone I can get it sharper, from start to finish, in less time, and at the same time, keep the snuffer perfectly balanced and not effect the temper! The method I use will do that. It’s a simple, fast, easy way to get a sharp broadhead and can be done by anyone if they have the basic equipment and driven by the goal of shooting a sharp head each and every time they let an arrow fly at a critter.

Have a great bowhunt. BB

From: Steamin
23-Dec-07
Great info in this thread, Hat's off to BB for a very informative and helpful thread.

23-Dec-07
BB:

Thanks for sharing your technique. I downloaded and saved the your original posting 10/11/04 and then "bit the bullet" and dug down deep in my wallet and bought a 4x10 DMT stone, Blue and Red.

Now my Snuffers are sharper than ever, (and so are my knives!)

Roger Rothhaar showed me how to sharpen his heads with a bastard mill file and a whetstone, I think it was about 1979. I experimented with a couple other heads since then, but have always been happiest and most confident when I have my No. 1 touched up Snuffer screwed in to my No. 1 arrow.

Back in the 80's and 90's I used to file down the back edges and put an edge on them.

But since I began shooting a compound bow in the mid-90's it does not seem necessary to file the back edges because the arrows always go through the animal.

Thanks again. All the Best and Best of Luck

From: Gray Ghost
23-Dec-07
Once again, Woody, you seem incapable of having a civil discussion.

Instead of your usual smarminess, why don't you explain why a machined 3-blade out of D2 isn't feasible for production. Or, why a 2-blade out of 440 at 57 Rockwell is doable, but a 3-blade isn't. Is it the tool pressures within the CNC machines that make this process so difficult?

I was formerly a CEO for a large design and fabrication shop that made printing press equipment. We had 3 state-of-the-art CNC machines running 24-7. Many of the parts that we fabricated made broadheads look like child's play from my perspective. But, I'm admittedly not an expert on the nuts and bolts side of fabrication.

So, please share a little more of your knowledge with us and back off the snide remarks.

Gratefully,

GG

From: midwest
23-Dec-07
BB, What size Snuffers are you shooting these days? 125 gr?

BTW, thanks again for the pics you sent. The muddy bull desktop at work has everyone that walks by do a double take.

From: Shrewski
23-Dec-07
Actually guys, Roger uses a 'running' grinding wheel to sharpen his Snuffers...he showed me his method last spring and it works great. His son Ryan has posted a tutorial on another traditional site if anyone is interested. It's not as dangerous as it sounds Woody.

From: Greywolf
24-Dec-07
I started using Snuffers bout 15 yrs ago. Bill sent me detailed instructions on how to sharpen snuffers. To date, I'd say I've sharpened well over a thousand heads using this method. On a recent hunt in Texas I took a 125 Snuffer fresh out of the package and had it hair popping sharp in about 5 minutes or less. all the while explaining what I was doing for a audience of 4-5 people. hardest part is to explain how much pressure to use. It just takes practice.

The hole a Snuffer makes is........as BB said, Magicial. and not to mention Huge. I've changed bows a couple of times in the last 10 yrs. but not my broadhead.

And for you guys that just can't get them sharp and are gonna give up on them? PM me, I'll takem and pay the shipping.

From: TomL
24-Dec-07
Shrewski, I also use a running wheel to sharpen my snuffers, woodsmans etc. For me it's a lot quicker to "get the edges together". I also use the diamond stones and end up with a leather strop. I'm sure both ways work just fine. I just like the wheel as it cuts down significantly on time per BH.

Tom

From: Gray Ghost
24-Dec-07
Yes, BB, thanks for another informative thread.

Please accept my apologies if you feel I derailed it. I was attempting to discuss how different materials and heat-treating can effect sharpening and edge retention, which I feel is relevant to the topic. Unfortunately, my posts were perceived by some as "bashing" your beloved Snuffer and the discussion took a turn for the worse.

The Snuffers are a great blade relative to most of their competition, IMO, and I know many folks are grateful to know how you sharpen them.

GG

From: BB
24-Dec-07
Matt. we all have our favorite heads. Snuffers are mine and quite few other guys and for those that use them and want to use them, and after many requests to repost the pictures, I did for those trying to learn.

Mike Sohm says all the time that his heads aren't perfect, but they keep trying to improve upon them and he's one of the few that give a lifetime warranty.

I don't think you derailed this thread at all. As you know I have never been one to discourage debate, because through it issues arise and it gives ALL a chance to defend, correct and set the record straight. I think Woody was just trying to do that.

I try to keep an open mind in all things, weigh the facts and then try to make an informed decision. This approach has served me well in life and so I welcome all comments, whiter I agree or not. I take no offense.

Merry Christmas Matt and Happy New Year.

And of course you old hunter, have a great bowhunt BB

From: Gray Ghost
24-Dec-07
"Merry Christmas Matt and Happy New Year."

Same to you and yours, my friend.

GG

From: yleecoyote23
25-Dec-07
BB said: "At this point in time I think a guy could purchase one double sided DMT steel and be set for life. In fact I just purchased a friend one for his Christmas present that is coarse (one step down from the black one(extra coarse) shown in the post where I was removing the grind). The other side is extra fine. I purchased it from Woodcraft and it ran $120.00 with free shipping."

I just ordered one with extra fine and coarse like you described above! Thanks! I use Snuffers and Wensel Woodsmen and have been able to get them sharp, but not the way I want them. Now I have just started using some SnufferSS with my compound and I think the Extrafine side of the DMT will be just the ticket! I also have an EZE-Lap fine stone that I just got that Greywolf showed me.

Great thread and great info BB!!! I was with Greywolf and saw him take those new from the package Snuffers and pop hair in just a matter of minutes!!! He uses an EZE-Lap stone and goes thru the same basic process you use!!

From: David Alford
26-Dec-07
BB, regarding the DMT method, I have the same stone but a side to side motion arguably gets an edge sharper. That's why expenisve sharpening is done at a tangent to the edge. I do it both ways; I was just interested if you had an opinion. I guess I would argue one's technique, pressure, etc. are more important than the approach angle.

It doesn't sound like you have actually tried the XBlock followed by the Simmon's wheelie sharpener.

A more acute edge correctly done will be sharper...that's why some guys here are trying the methods above to sharpen on a curve - to get a more acute angle.

That said, it may not make any real world difference.

Irregardless, one of the problems we all have is the inprecison of bh manufacturing. The blade grinds could be better and the blade spacing could be better. Some people don't think this is important since sharpening will eventually "get them there". I disagree. Starting with a more precisely made bh would help.

Magnus does a good job, but it could be better and there is some opportunity for another company to come along and fill that niche. Currently, it seems the hi-precision folks are mostly interested in making Steelforce type heads, but sooner or later...

From: David Alford
26-Dec-07
I will say the new short Snuffer seems to be more precisely made, but I'd like to see that higher level applied to the other 3 blades they make, including the larger Snuffers and the Wensel Woodsman.

The problem is, these bhs really need to made with a machined furrule to reach the next step, otherwise you can't get absolutely precise spacing of the blades. W/o that, sharpening results will never be optimized.

From: bb
26-Dec-07
"Also, is the

DuoSharp® DuoBase - Bench Stone Base

$16.99 Item #: B8250

a necessity?"

No, but it's really nice to use. Money well spent IMO

From: Bowfreak
27-Dec-07

Bowfreak's Link
Zbone,

The link I have listed is one BB sent me. It is the link to where he purchased the 10" stone he is talking about. It is a coarse/extra fine 10" duosharp. I bought the 8" coarse/extra fine duosharp. It is on the way right now. Also, free shipping on an order of that amount(I think it is over $75).

From: BB
27-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
There is nothing I have found, that works better, than the extra coarse steel for removing material fast. I can take the original grind off an old snuffer and in less than 2-3 minutes, and have it ready for my extra fine steel. So from start to finish, in less than four minutes, I can have all but the very worst damaged head, razor sharp, if I do the original grind with the extra coarse head.

The only problem with that steel is they only make it with the coarse-extra coarse combination. I wish they made it in an extra coarse-extra fine, but they don't. Therefore I recommend the coarse-extra fine steel. The coarse steel will take a bit more time, to remove lots of material (factory grind) (bad damage from a shot), but still do it reasonably fast. Once that's achieved, then the extra fine is the steel I like to use, but the fine is okay too.

I can assure you, if you're thinking about getting one of these, it is well worth the extra money to go with the longest steel available. There’s a reason I recommend this, as I have purchased a few shorter versions, and because of the short stroke, the process is tougher to do. Believe me on this one! I made that mistake several times, and will never make it again. The shorter steels can work, but like mentioned the longer strokes make it much easier, faster and I think better in the end.

Above is a picture of my finishing steel. It's 2 1-/2 inches wide and 12" long. For putting a very sharp edge on a snuffer, knife, chisel etc., I have found nothing better. The combination steels I suggest are great and do a super job. As you can see in my first post (the picture of all my steels) I’ve tried quite a few combinations. If one has the money to spend, there is nothing better than the extra coarse-coarse combo for taking off the grind or the damage from shooting. And there is not a better steel than the 12” solid steel in the finest grit made (see pictured above with this post) to put the finishing touches on a blade.

And like someone already mentioned, the holder is not a necessity, but sure is nice! I have bought them both ways, and the holder, if one can afford it, is well worth its price.

Have a great bowhunt. BB

From: BB
27-Dec-07
Zbone, I have never used serrated blades with the exception of cutting bread, so I really know nothing about that. I do have a lot of respect for HH, so if you ask him why he does it I am sure you could get a much better answer than from me.

Happy New Year to all. BB

From: Scoot
27-Dec-07
Not trying to hijack here- I think this is relevant enough to not feel like I'm sending us off on a tangent... I'm going to switch broadheads next year. I'm seriously looking at the Snuffer SS and the Stinger Buzzcuts. I like the look of the 2 blade Buzzcuts,, but they don't look nearly as straightforward to sharpen as the Snuffer. I am equiped to sharpen Buzzcuts without any further purchase, but I'd have to get a Lansky system if I went with the Buzzcuts (according to the Magnus fellas). So... I'm leaning toward the Snuffer SS. However, I'm wondering about the pros and cons of a permanent blade broadhead like the Snuffer vs. a replacable blade broadhead. Can anyone weigh in on this?

From: bb
27-Dec-07
If you don't like to re-sharpen a broadhead or just can't get them sharp, then a replacable blade head is for you. Other than that I can't really think of an advantage a replaceable blade head has. The Snuffer SS is a terrific broadhead, you won't go wrong if you select that head to use.

From: Bowfreak
27-Dec-07
I don't really see any cons to switching to the Snuffer SS. It has permanent blades that you have to resharpen but, once you get them you have them for life! If you don't lose them they have a lifetime warranty. I am sure the Buzzcut is great too but, I like 3 blade heads better.

From: David Alford
27-Dec-07
I'll reinterate, the XBlock followed by the Simmon's wheelie sharpener is arguably the best overall system out there. For the Snuffer, you will be able to put a more acute edge on the head if you so choose. Until you have tried it and say the combination of these two isn't all that, you should keep an open mind. Not only will it work well with Snuffers, it will work well with any broadhead, including Grizzlys and others that give people the fits.

That said, I have the stones BB has recommended and in fact have posted for years on the "Leatherwall" (bowsite's sister site for trad. archers)virtually the same system for getting good results with the Wensel Woodsman which as most here know is essentailly a lower profile Snuffer.

Zbone, yes just orient the Snuffer so the long axis of the head is perpendicular to the long axis of the stone. Hold the head with thumb and index finger and move sideways in both directions, counting the number pretty much as BB describes.

Woody, thanks for your comments. I pretty much agree with your points, but I believe the overall market shows people are willing to pay more for the very best.

I'd like to see a low profile SS with no blade vents. Imagine it, produce it...I predict "they will come"! lol That would be a wicked little broadhead.

From: BB
27-Dec-07

BB's embedded Photo
BB's embedded Photo
My dad taught me, when I killed my neighbor’s cat, there was more than one way to skin it!

I am just kidding about the cat of course. But I understand there are lots of ways to make heads sharp. I just happen to think the way I do it, is a very simple way, that results in razor sharp snuffers, in very little time, providing one has the proper steels or stones. It took me a lot of years to discover this method, as I had no one to teach me. It is a very easy method to learn, with a pretty minimum out lay, when one considers these steels will last a lifetime.

If one wanted the very best steels for THIS process(and money was no issue), the two pictured above is what I would choose and the ones I always use. The yellow one on the top is the steel I use to take off the factory edge (black dot). Once the grind is removed, I switch to the bottom steel and finish them on that (extra fine dmt steel). If one wanted them even sharper you could leather strop them. I have found that unnecessary, although I have done it in the past. I put myself through college barbing and thus I used to use a straight razor and so I have a very good leather strop.

When I place my broadhead in my quiver, I know it is razor sharp and will go through the length or the wide of a critter and come out sharp, unless I happened to hit a very hard bone. Since I use my knife and not my broadhead to gut my critters, it only has to stay sharp long enough to do the job intended and that is to go through an animal.

Once its done its job, I place it in my quiver, clean it when I get the first chance and sharpen it up for the next go round.

And once a guy gets sharpening his broadheads and sees how sharp he can get them, it becomes fun and pleasurable. I can not imagine hunting with a broadhead I hadn’t sharpened. It just becomes another enjoyable satisfaction of the bowhunting process.

Have a great bowhunt BB

From: David Alford
27-Dec-07
Re: nonvented bhs, yep you're right on that & I wonder whether muscle doesn't get caught a bit in the vents reducing potential penetration. Plus, nonvents eliminates any problems with noise. I'd suggest something similar to the old Bodkin, but even lower profile and of course real steel.

From: David Alford
27-Dec-07
BB, you might be interested in the new 8000 DMT stone: http://www.dmtsharp.com/general/new.htm#d8ee

I doubt many will try the Simmon's wheelie sharpener I mentioned above,figuring it's just another tunsten wheel sharpener. But it's not. Although small and inexpensive, it's a great finish sharpener that will even get Steelforce blades sharper than factory. Think about that.

The wheels are actually titanium. It gives a finer edge than tungsten. Fantastic for two blade bhs like Magnus & Zwickey as well as very hard to sharpen 3 blades like the Bodkin (which does not respond well to DMT).

Let me add something about the 3 blade Bodkin. It acutally is a GREAT bh that never hit the bigtime. Why? 1) very hard to sharpen 2) was marketed and priced as a cheap bh. 3) wrong color. Fact is, it is one tough SOB that is fabulous IF you can sharpen it! As I said, a bit lower profile with real metal...you'd have something great.

From: David Alford
27-Dec-07
Sorry, I meant real steel. The Bodkin is made with some type of hard alloy. I doubt the sell many except to guys who want to hunt rabbits. Wasted potential, IMO. Good overall designs come and go...

From: Steamin
28-Dec-07
BB's method works, I was having trouble getting my SS snuffers shaving sharp and after a couple of e-mails Bill had me right on track and shaving sharp in a matter of minutes.

Great thread..

From: David Alford
28-Dec-07
The Woodsman took a bit of a rap with the tip bending because not everyone would clip the point down a bit as almost everyone said to do. It takes all of 10 secs. But that extra step created a stumbling block that caused a few people to complain. If you tried to satisfy everyone a broadhead would probably look like a Swiss army knife.

From: Mystic Arrow
01-Jan-08
I haven't bowhunted that long but use snuffers because my uncle and grandfather do. They tried all different sharpening methods over the years, files, sandpaper, and stones. This diamond steel method is the best. Thanks BB for sharing this.

02-Jan-08
Tx BB. I've followed your threads on snuffer sharpening and always had good luck. I have been using snuffers since the 70's. This method is working out by far the best for me. Tx again for sharing your hard earned information.

02-Jan-08
Tx BB. I've followed your threads on snuffer sharpening and always had good luck. I have been using snuffers since the 70's. This method is working out by far the best for me. Tx again for sharing your hard earned information.

From: DJ Army
02-Jan-08
take a belt sander put it in a vise, lock it in the on position lay you braoadhead on the paper and voila, you can use any number of sanding grits to what ever your BH needs. Then touch up if needed whith a stone.Always use an old shaft to hold BH with for safety reasons.

DJ

From: Bou'bound
15-Jul-08

From: Ermine
17-Jul-08
I shoot the Snuffer SS. (Awesome heads) Anyways I was wondering BB if you could recommend a good stone sharpener that I could buy that it fairly cheap. I know the good stones can be upwards of $90 but I need something cheap. I have the montec sharpener, but it is too short as I feel the longer stones would sharpen much easier and faster.

From: Heat
17-Jul-08
Ermine,

Try allprotools.com for good prices on dmt

Nick

From: C2
17-Jul-08
I just held a Snuffer SS 125 next to a Snuffer 160 original. The SS looks like a toy next to the real thing. You know an action figure next to the real Super Hero. I use Automotive (for metal) sandpaper( in coarse to super fine grits) glued to a sheet of glass to sharpen my Snuffers in a similar way as BB's method. You can also glue it to a can and achieve a hollow ground type edge.

From: thesquid
17-Jul-08
In the last 50 years I've tried a bunch of different type of broad heads and have always come back the the snuffers. They fly right, cut a Big hole, and are easy to sharpen and keep sharp. I do the last stroke with an old bucher steel and can shave with the head. Guys look at my BH's and laugh at me for using these things but the short blood trails from spot of impact to recovering the deer or bear is all I care about. These same guys brag about the deer only going 80 - 100 yards when mine go 30 - 40 tops. What can you say, a quick kill is the best. I use the 125 g. and feel I'll never fall for anything else again, it's snuffer all the way. And, they cost a fraction of the others too.

From: LongbowBob
18-Jul-08

LongbowBob's Link
3 Rivers has a carbide sharpener that is specifically made for WW's and would work for Snufferss too. It works great. It cost about $20, not hundreds of dollars for stones.

LBB

From: Heat
21-Jul-08
TTT again for one of the best threads on Bowsite!

I opened up a new package of Snuffer SS heads the other night and sharpened them up. While it took a lot longer than 5 minutes to go from the factory grind to my finished head, they did come out much sharper than they were when they came out of the package.

I did not realize how much pressure you can use with the extra coarse steel to remove the factory grind. Once I got that figured out, I reduced the time it took to get it sharp by half.

Thanks BB,

Nick

From: GregE
07-Aug-08
It's sharpening time again.........

G

From: Ermine
18-Aug-08
Bill- Maybe this was mentioned, but is there any differnece in the degree of sharpness by doing front to back vs back to front? I shoot the Snuffer SS, and I know that magnus recommends front to back swipes on a flat stone.

From: Bowfreak
20-Oct-08
Ermine, I am curious too but I thought Magnus recommends just drawing the head straight back. I have found that works perfect when you don't have to reconstruct the edge. If the edge is messed up, I go both directions, front to back.

From: Ermine
21-Oct-08
Yes Magnus says to draw it strait back. BB says to go from back to front. IS there a difference?

From: Bowfreak
21-Oct-08
I don't know? I just know that by pushing the head forward it takes more metal off the head. That is why I do it that way if I foul up an edge. Maybe BB or Woody can clear it up for us.

From: jungleman06
21-Oct-08
http://www.theknifestore.com/servlet/the-875/EZE-Lap-6-in./Detail

i picked up one of these and have some fine whet stones around the house to finish the edge with. make sure if you keep the pressure equal on either side or you will wind up with a steeper angle on one side.

From: GregE
15-May-10
Once again, thinking about sharpening and this needs to be shared.

G

From: Zbone
16-May-10
Great thread.

21-May-10
I've been using Snuffers for about six months. I enjoy that I get to put the edge on my own broadheads and take pride in the work to get them there. I use diamond stones and they do get really sharp. I killed mt first hog with Snuffers about a week ago. I shot a 150lb sow right behind the joint of the right front leg qaurtering away. She took off and immediatley started down. 20 yards was all she could stand and it was over. The broadhead had been "ground up" unside her and the tip was slightly bent and some blades pushed inward. Did it fail? Absolutely not. It punched a tremendous hole in her when it hit the mark and put her down quick. I had hit the opposite shoulder preventing a complete pass through but it was a devastating hit to her vitals. The Magnus warranty will replace my broadhead, what more could you want???

From: SNUFFER
14-Jan-11
Somehow I missed this thread back then and just stumbled across it. Some very good info for sharpening my SNUFFERS. Thanks to all who shared some helpfull ideas, especially BB.

Tony Sanders/aka"SNUFFER"

From: stagetek
14-Jan-11
Buy them quick. Magnus is going to stop making the Snuffer. I believe they're trying to sell the line.

From: Zbone
14-Jan-11
thanx for bringing back to the top before the photos expired.

From: BB
08-Dec-11
Back up for Bucdzastr.

Here's a thread I did some years back and its a very easy, sure way to get snuffers razor sharp.

Have a great bow hunt. BB

From: Tracker
24-Jul-12
Funny hole this thresd continues to have importance. Needed some instructions for sharpening. Got it here.

Back to the top.

From: Deacon Dave
24-Jul-12
Great thread. Thanks Bill! I use BB's method on NAP hellrazors. Works great.

From: Bill in MI
16-Aug-15
Resurrected sans Woody of course

From: Cottonwood88
18-Aug-15
I love em!

From: Bigwoods
18-Aug-15
How long do the stones last and do you only use the super fine stone for touch up?

From: Mad_Angler
19-Aug-15
Great thread. I've seen similar threads about sharpening VPAs.

I got this list of supplies from a site where they talk about archery...

"Well, I decided I was going to do it right and get some quality tools that will hopefully last me many years. Sold off my climbing treestand I never used to pick up what I needed to do the job probably better than I need to, but I'm kind of anal about these kind of things. I went to sharpeningsupplies.com picked up the following tools: http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/DM...it-P404C3.aspx

http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/10...p-P264C11.aspx

http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/Gr...nd-P26C11.aspx

Like I say, I'm sure it's probably overkill, but this should be all I need and then some for the forseeable future. Thanks for the suggestions. "

From: Mad_Angler
19-Aug-15
But after listening to BB, I'm considering bigger, longer stones...

From: Mad_Angler
19-Aug-15

Mad_Angler's Link
This looks like a good kit:

I shoot a broadhead league all summer. We shoot broadheads through cardboard animal silhouettes and then into sand piles. I wanted to see if I could get one shaving sharp after a summer of sand piles. It might take a coarse stone to get started.

19-Aug-15
BB's way is great. If you want to spend $150 or more dollars. He makes the statement a file gets the edges lopsided. I'm sorry but, I have been doing it for a couple years with a file and if done correctly, which is almost impossible not to do, there are no lopsided edges. It is physically impossible.

A large fine grit file costs $8. Finish on cardboard, leather, your pants leg, anything that can be pulled tight or has a smooth surface, and you will be shaving with them in no time. The key isn't the tools he uses. The key is the reality that he removes the factory grinds, then cleans that edge by honing. He accomplishes that better with the tools he chooses. Anyone can do the same, with the same results, with adequate tools of their choice. they need not cost a days work.

I'm not being disrespectful. I know the costs of the stones as I have bought them for the same purpose. I just prefer cheaper. I now have a lifetime times 4 of diamond stones that don;t do anything but sharpen knives. You tube is full of much cheaper but, just as effective and fast ways to do this. Search Rick Barbee as a good start. To each their own. God Bless

From: deerman406
19-Aug-15
Sorry but what is easy about that? Take a large file and just change the angle by running them the length of it laid flat a couple times and than grab a 3 sided jewel stick and hit it a few times on each side of the jewel stick and done. Takes less than 2 minutes a head and will make them so sharp, when you look at them your eyes will bleed. File $8 and a good jewel stick $20-$25. Not being disrespectful either just why spend the money and the time when you can do it way faster and make them as sharp or sharper. Shawn

From: Bigwoods
20-Aug-15
I don't do well sharpening broadheads. I bought a 14 inch file years ago and lay it flat to take off the factory edge. It sucked compared to doing it BB's way and I noticed the lopsided edges also. I also was much less consistent with the amount of metal I removed and so the weights of the heads varied when I was done.

20-Aug-15
This is a VPA but, the same principle applies to any three blade. His tools are his choice but, any adequate tool will result in the same thing. Notice he doesn't drag it on the file like so many here think is the only way. He cross pushes the file back to front, two blades at a time. If you can't do this successfully and cheaply than, yeah, you got real problems. God Bless

From: elkstabber
20-Aug-15
WV Mountaineer is right. I've had tremendous luck using VPA three blade heads.

A file is very easy to use to take down the factory edge on Snuffers or WWs (which I used to use). VPA's come sharp enough that you won't have to do this until you hit dirt or rocks.

The stone that I use to finish them is a fine diamond stone from Cabela's that is 8" long. No doubt that BB is right and that longer is better (heh heh).

Your mileage may vary.

From: Beendare
20-Aug-15
The best technique I've found varies a little from the above; I use the long diamond fine stone- then to finish I use a triangular Chock stick [like in the Spyderco Sharpsmaker] across the 3 sides of the head....about 6 strokes a side light pressure.

Its so simple- and gets any 3 blade fixed head popping sharp with no burr

From: deerman406
20-Aug-15
The VPA already has the correct angle to the edge and that is all I shoot now(shot 160 grain Snuffers for years)Now I shoot the 175 grain VPA's and all you need is a 3 sided jewel stick and 30 seconds and they are scary sharp. I do disgaree about the VPA's being sharp enough out of the package, they are sharp but no where near as sharp as I like them. Whatever works for folks but I just don't find it too hard to get any 3 blade head sharp, now a 2-blade does take me some time but I get them done too. Shawn

From: Tilzbow
04-Jul-18
TTT as this is still valid for heads like VPA. Does anyone make the old style Snuffers anymore?

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