ARE YOU CONSIDERING RETIREMENT
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
deerslayer37 15-Dec-18
spike78 15-Dec-18
wyobullshooter 15-Dec-18
Buffalo1 15-Dec-18
t-roy 15-Dec-18
ahunter76 15-Dec-18
7mm08 15-Dec-18
midwest 15-Dec-18
Factory rat 15-Dec-18
Jaquomo 15-Dec-18
Jim McCann 15-Dec-18
Bowboy 15-Dec-18
wyobullshooter 15-Dec-18
cnelk 15-Dec-18
wyobullshooter 15-Dec-18
Orlando 15-Dec-18
BOHNTR 15-Dec-18
Kurt 15-Dec-18
TXHunter 15-Dec-18
BullBuster 15-Dec-18
ElkNut1 15-Dec-18
Charlie Rehor 15-Dec-18
deadeye 15-Dec-18
fastflight 15-Dec-18
PoudreCanyon 15-Dec-18
BIGHORN 15-Dec-18
nmwapiti 15-Dec-18
Jaquomo 15-Dec-18
kakiat kid 15-Dec-18
antlerman 15-Dec-18
Charlie Rehor 15-Dec-18
JSW 15-Dec-18
Duke 15-Dec-18
hunting dad 15-Dec-18
TEmbry 15-Dec-18
cord 62 15-Dec-18
Bowfreak 15-Dec-18
drslyr 15-Dec-18
Stringwacker 15-Dec-18
Buffalo1 15-Dec-18
skull 15-Dec-18
fatbass 15-Dec-18
INbowdude 15-Dec-18
Elkoholic 15-Dec-18
JCarrowthem 15-Dec-18
drycreek 15-Dec-18
GLP 15-Dec-18
Deertick 15-Dec-18
Coyote 65 15-Dec-18
Ogoki 15-Dec-18
Rob in VT 15-Dec-18
Franklin 15-Dec-18
Olink 15-Dec-18
Slate 15-Dec-18
jstephens61 15-Dec-18
Ogoki 15-Dec-18
yooper89 15-Dec-18
MarkU 15-Dec-18
jingalls 15-Dec-18
cnelk 15-Dec-18
Jaquomo 15-Dec-18
JL 15-Dec-18
Scoot 15-Dec-18
Sam S 15-Dec-18
yeager 15-Dec-18
GLB 15-Dec-18
Bob H in NH 15-Dec-18
Screwball 15-Dec-18
jstephens61 15-Dec-18
Owl 15-Dec-18
Native Okie 15-Dec-18
copperman 15-Dec-18
BOWUNTR 15-Dec-18
eddie c 15-Dec-18
IdyllwildArcher 15-Dec-18
TreeWalker 16-Dec-18
pav 16-Dec-18
leftee 16-Dec-18
BULELK1 16-Dec-18
peterk1234 16-Dec-18
BC 16-Dec-18
Franzen 16-Dec-18
Ogoki 16-Dec-18
Forest bows 16-Dec-18
Dino 16-Dec-18
Cornpone 16-Dec-18
Z Barebow 16-Dec-18
12yards 16-Dec-18
Mathewshootrphone 16-Dec-18
Ambush 16-Dec-18
BOWUNTR 16-Dec-18
Rock 16-Dec-18
Russell 16-Dec-18
mtnview 16-Dec-18
Tracker 16-Dec-18
trkyslr 16-Dec-18
AZ8 16-Dec-18
Alaska at heart 16-Dec-18
BigOzzie 17-Dec-18
goelk 17-Dec-18
cnelk 17-Dec-18
GhostBird 17-Dec-18
GotBowAz 17-Dec-18
South Farm 17-Dec-18
JSW 17-Dec-18
Eric Vaillancourt 17-Dec-18
LaGriz 17-Dec-18
Brotsky 17-Dec-18
ben h 17-Dec-18
Jaquomo 17-Dec-18
Zim 17-Dec-18
Jaquomo 17-Dec-18
BOWNUT 17-Dec-18
kstout 17-Dec-18
Dale06 17-Dec-18
Ogoki 17-Dec-18
Bob H in NH 17-Dec-18
Stix 17-Dec-18
MPN 17-Dec-18
wyobullshooter 17-Dec-18
SDHNTR(home) 17-Dec-18
Ogoki 17-Dec-18
wyobullshooter 17-Dec-18
Proline 17-Dec-18
ground hunter 17-Dec-18
Longbeard 17-Dec-18
Double Creek 17-Dec-18
Santee 17-Dec-18
cnelk 17-Dec-18
midwest 18-Dec-18
elkstabber 18-Dec-18
air leak 18-Dec-18
4point97 18-Dec-18
South Farm 18-Dec-18
Drummer Boy 18-Dec-18
Ambush 18-Dec-18
dizzydctr 18-Dec-18
cnelk 18-Dec-18
Ogoki 18-Dec-18
TrapperKayak 18-Dec-18
Drummer Boy 18-Dec-18
Ambush 18-Dec-18
air leak 18-Dec-18
Ambush 18-Dec-18
cnelk 18-Dec-18
Jaquomo 18-Dec-18
grossklw 18-Dec-18
APauls 18-Dec-18
Ambush 18-Dec-18
grape 18-Dec-18
Jaquomo 18-Dec-18
cnelk 18-Dec-18
Ambush 18-Dec-18
LaGriz 18-Dec-18
Ambush 18-Dec-18
SD BuckBuster 18-Dec-18
grossklw 18-Dec-18
cnelk 18-Dec-18
Ambush 18-Dec-18
Mike-TN 18-Dec-18
bullelk 18-Dec-18
Rob in VT 18-Dec-18
jstephens61 18-Dec-18
Huntosolo 18-Dec-18
jstephens61 18-Dec-18
wyobullshooter 18-Dec-18
Drummer Boy 19-Dec-18
From: deerslayer37
15-Dec-18
Are you thinking of retirement or are you retiring at the end of the year? I'm 52 years old and beginning to think about it often. I'm planning on 62 and out.

From: spike78
15-Dec-18
I think about it all the time at 40 years old too bad I can’t afford to!

15-Dec-18
My last day of work is 31 Dec. I’ll be a few days shy of 65.

From: Buffalo1
15-Dec-18
I give thanks and enjoy it every day. It became a reality for me 11 years ago.

I began thinking about it when I entered the workforce after completing college.

From: t-roy
15-Dec-18
My dad is considering Slowing down at the end of the year. He’ll be 83 in a week.

I’m planning for it, but have absolutely no plans on it till I’m, at least 70, God willing.

From: ahunter76
15-Dec-18

ahunter76's embedded Photo
ahunter76's embedded Photo
My plant shut it's doors when I was 60. I did get a pension for 32 years & have been retired ever since. LOVE IT. I just turned 77 & bowhunt plenty & compete in 3-Ds, State & NFAA Field & target too. Enjoy 15 G-kids & 8 family members share some type archery with me.. It just gets better. Me & my son pic.

From: 7mm08
15-Dec-18
I have 2 yrs to go and will be 60. The military will kick me out at 60 as that is the max age limit. I will be ready to go. Getting tired. :-)

From: midwest
15-Dec-18
5 more years...

Congrats, Rob!

15-Dec-18
If everything works out my plan is to go in a little under 4 years I'll be 58.

From: Jaquomo
15-Dec-18
4.5 years ago on my 60th birthday. I'm busy all the time and can't imagine going back to a real job now!

From: Jim McCann
15-Dec-18
Retired at 50 from one profession after 30 years of service, did another job mostly for fun for about 4 1/2 years, one more job for 11 years for a lot of money, and then retired from regular work for good. I've been writing and photographing for magazines for some 35 years and I continue to do that, but mostly I do whatever I want to do. I hunt with a recurve and shoot for practice often, build arrows, tie flies, fly fish, train and hunt over top Brittany pointing dogs a lot over the course of a 9-month long upland season, hunt all sort of wildlife all year long with my cameras...I nap whenever I feel like it.

From: Bowboy
15-Dec-18
Only have 2 more years. I can't wait!

15-Dec-18
Thanks Nick! Hard to believe it’s finally almost here. I’ll be just a couple months shy of 43yrs federal service.

From: cnelk
15-Dec-18
May 29, 2020 is the plan for me. I'll be 56 - 17 months!

Hey Rob, I think that's worth a toast on Thursday!

15-Dec-18
I think we need something stronger than toast! ;-)

From: Orlando
15-Dec-18
56 and the company offered a buyout this year. Thought and figured hard about it. Came to the conclusion that it is best I keep working. I hope that I am able to retire at 62 but don't want to.

From: BOHNTR
15-Dec-18
I'm almost 52 and have been retired since April........I love it!

From: Kurt
15-Dec-18
4-1/2 yrs mostly retired for me. Did it a couple days before Stone sheep season when I was almost 62. Love it....built a house (General Contractor), landscaped it with rock walls, etc...still a bit left for '19. Got a new Vizsla a year ago that is hunting very well and gets me out for a great walk on the mountain or river ever day if we are not going bird hunting.

Also have the time to to hunt some big game critters that I didn't get the opportunity to chase, or hunt as many days when I was working....and often drive and see the country (makes bringing the critter home a lot easier).

Good luck with retirement!!!

From: TXHunter
15-Dec-18
I’m blessed to have a career I enjoy with lots of time flexibility so there’s no big rush to retire.

That said, there’s no real substitute for total freedom to go and do as one pleases whenever one pleases so I’ll probably retire in 5-7 years. I’m 54.

From: BullBuster
15-Dec-18
I like my work as a physician but I like not working more. Done in June. 55 yo

From: ElkNut1
15-Dec-18
I retired 10 years ago at 53, still hanging in there!

Rob, congrats! That's pretty darn good with 43 years of service!

ElkNut/Paul

15-Dec-18
For me I cut and ran at age 55. That was Ten years ago last October. Nothing to do now but bow hunt 100 days a year. I’m “limping by”!

From: deadeye
15-Dec-18
Rob, I too congratulate you on your long career. I retired early (55) as Postmaster of a small town and has been one of the best decisions I ever made. Now I guide elk hunts, hunt, fish, golf and pick up a side job now and then. Good luck to you!!

From: fastflight
15-Dec-18
Congrats to everybody that is close to retirement. Just curious how you would rank the following items when choosing when to retire. 1. How much you enjoy your job? 2. How much money you have for retirement? 3. Family health history. 4. Health insurance. I am only 46 but as I save for retirement I look at all the calculators and having enough for retirement seems to have as much to do with your life expectancy as it does anything else. I have had 2 grandpas pass in there 50s with my dad just making it to 70 before passing. I guess we never know when our time will come but I really worry about waiting too long and not getting a chance to enjoy retirement. Anybody else retire at 55 with this in mind or do other reasons dictate when you retire?

From: PoudreCanyon
15-Dec-18
Wish I could, but not enough steaks in the freezer. 46 is the perfect age for retirement IMO:)

From: BIGHORN
15-Dec-18
First of all you should consider what you want to do during your retirement and, if you can afford it. Things that you will want to do is make sure that your home and vehicles are paid off (no bills). Monthly income is a big thing to pay your insurance, water, electric, heating costs and groceries. Add up your monthly bills to get this figure and plan on the prices going up each year. How often do your like to go out for dinner or purchase new clothing. What will you buy the kids or grandchildren for Christmas, birthdays and things like that. I retired 19 years ago at the age of 54 and find that we have way more than what we need for the things we like to do. We go out to eat several times a week, go on European cruises every year and give kids and grandchildren expensive gifts just because we want to do it. Lots of hunting and fishing trips too. If you don't plan properly you may get yourself in a real bind.

From: nmwapiti
15-Dec-18
Retired from the military this spring in mid 40's. Never been so busy and loving it. I get to choose how long I am away from home. Did three 2 week trips for elk and deer this year. Good start...

From: Jaquomo
15-Dec-18
I would have pulled the trigger at 55 was making too much to walk away. That extra 5 years of work allowed me to pay off my house in town and the one in the mountains, plus structure retirement income so that I can live comfortably and never run out of money.

Relatives on mom's side live into their 90s, men on dad's side get prostate cancer but die from something else. I balanced the difference and decided waiting and accumulating more money wouldn't do me any good of I was dirt-napping.

No matter what we do, theres always a risk. Several trusted friends advised to retire as soon as you can. Good advice as long as you have passions to keep you busy and motivated. Many do not...

From: kakiat kid
15-Dec-18
47 now and can go at 55, not sure if I will, youngest will be entering the 10th grade. I may wait till he is done. That will give me about 67% of the three highest years of my salary. Not too shabby for the un-glamorous life of a teacher.

From: antlerman
15-Dec-18
Im 46 and have 3 to get through college. Good thing is they are all straight A's students and Fantastic athletes. First one got a full ride playing college softball, second one is on her way as well, third one will either be playing baseball or basketball he's 6-3 at 13 and still putting on height and weight. Kinda hoping he throws a baseball 98 mph and then he'll be able to buy us some hunting ground.

My retirement is gonna revolve around that. House is paid for and just about everything is cash or don't get it. I live simple and my wife is fine with the way we live so not much money needed here.

Looking at 52-55 at the latest either broke or in good enough shape to make it. I love hunting to much to work all my life. Seen the factory concrete break my dad down for 41 years no he's 70 and just cannot hunt like he would love to. Bad knees hips and back. He told me the other day " I'm lowering my standards cause I don't have many hunts left in me". I smiled and said it's about the hunt and the memories we've made all these years anyways and besides your out of room on the walls anyways. Still going and killing good deer though. Deep down that hits ya in the heart knowing those day aren't to far away really.

After typing this now I'm thinking 50 don't sound like a bad number to retire now.

15-Dec-18
From age 55 to 65 my biggest expense by far was health insurance for my wife and me. No debt is a key requirement but 20k per year for health insurance was a killer, on Medicare now so big cost reduction.

From: JSW
15-Dec-18
I've been mostly unemployed for 10 years now. I got lucky and found something that I was really good at and was able to grow it until the stress got to great. Having nearly 100 employees is a nightmare. Then we sold out and bought some hunting property. I was and still am, too young to be retired so I remain unemployed. I do take on a few jobs to help with my addiction but not many. It didn't hurt that my wife and I are both tightwads so we saved and invested heavily. I chose to work twice as hard for half as long and it's been great. I still don't have time to do half of what I'd like. I no longer have the income to go sheep hunting every year but thankfully there are plenty of things to hunt that don't break the bank. If you can afford to do it, do it.

From: Duke
15-Dec-18
Great post and points made, Lou. Not even close here, but think about it often as I weasel as much away into long-term investments, 401k, and paying off remaining mortgage while socking away for children's' college funds. I don't have a real desire to not work at age X, but to simply work less, and less...

From: hunting dad
15-Dec-18
5.5 more years for me. Have to be 66.5 to make SS work. May start "slowing down" sooner, but won't take that check till then. My personal IRA accounts are doing well. Fingers crossed.

From: TEmbry
15-Dec-18
I’m 27 for another week yet and I think about it almost daily :) lol

From: cord 62
15-Dec-18
8 more to go, i'll be 56

From: Bowfreak
15-Dec-18
I can leave in 5 years. Probably will do at least 3 more on top of that. My insurance is covered 100% as is my wife's when she retires. That's a huge benefit.

From: drslyr
15-Dec-18
Can’t believe how many can retire at 55. I’m 62 losing my 401k in the stock market and can’t even consider retirement till 65 or 70 or maybe not ever be able to.

From: Stringwacker
15-Dec-18
My promise to myself was to retire at 55. Right after the turn of the year I turn 61. I have more than enough to retire including the healthcare cost. That said I have a chronic condition that would likely make me uninsurable if pre-exiting coverage goes away. The cost of healthcare doesn’t stop me; but the thought of no health insurance at any cost does.

From: Buffalo1
15-Dec-18
I was in Human Resources Mgt for 35 yrs. I got a lot of advice from employees retiring. Got to see for employees successfully retire and were happy and some not so successful and were not happy.

What I saw as the major keys were:

1. No debt when retiring

2. Have things you want to do with your time when you retire. Variety is key.

3. Don’t have a nagging mate with a constant daily “honey do” that greets you every waking morning. Have an understanding about this matter before retiring. I’ve seen many return or want to return to work because of the “nagging” issue.

4. Protect and preserve your health as much as possible. Without good health an enjoyable retirement is not possible. Exercise, good diet, rest, limited stress and limited alcohol consumption are key elements. These measures also help to reduce the high medical/health related costs.

5. Learn about every senior discount and take advantage. This can help provide more spending money.

Just some things to consider.

From: skull
15-Dec-18
I almost retired last night 1number away from winning 60 million And no I’m not going to be able Intel 65,15 more years

From: fatbass
15-Dec-18
I will be 53 in January, at 56 I'm done, 3 more years. My amazing wife and I are going to buy a home off the beach in Saint Augustine Florida.

From: INbowdude
15-Dec-18
Turned 60 today. 5 more years retire from teaching and then work at Walmart until 66.8 unless Congress bumps up retirement to 70 and then it's more teaching.

From: Elkoholic
15-Dec-18
46 and planning to retire at 56. Can’t wait!

From: JCarrowthem
15-Dec-18
Retired 10 years ago at 52 still doing great hunted New Mex. WY. and Mont. this year. Wife retired last week and home all the time will see how this go"s!!!

From: drycreek
15-Dec-18
I've been retired for 4 years now. It took some getting used to after working since I was 16 years old. Getting up at 5:00am comes in handy deer hunting though ! :-)

From: GLP
15-Dec-18
Retired September 1. Have had a great fall. Buffalo 1 has some great advice. Next year I will be more picky on deer even though I am not a trophy hunter. Every day is good. Greg

From: Deertick
15-Dec-18
Retirement ... we'll see. Sure, I'd like to retire, but I get a lot of satisfaction from my work, and that'll need to be made up in other ways. And I haven't sorted that out yet. No amount of camping and hunting and riding will make up for those things. I'll need to be careful.

From: Coyote 65
15-Dec-18
Retired for 10 years. My wife had the opportunity to go to Houston for a big raise in pay and being able to invest in the companies oil ventures.

While I was in Houston got to turn a hobby into a job. (Working on the CAF B-17 Texas Raiders). Thus was able to use my A&P license I had gotten in the 1970's. She was able to make a killing on some of her oil field investments and retired at 58 seven years after I had retired. We now live in an inholding in the Tonto NF in AZ. Where I elk hunt (when I get a tag) and deer hunt, and turkey. The only bad thing is I can't hunt the deer that come by the house (about once a week) as the wife considers them pets. 1/2 mile away is ok, but no shooting from the porch.

We went into final retirement with house paid off, vehicles paid off, and about 50 thousand a year from dividend payments. Insurance is a no problem for us as we are now both on Medicare and Tricare. Before she reached Medicare age Tricare paid out about a 500,000 in benefits for her cancer. So if you are prior military and young enough get back in the reserves, or National Guard to get that insurance benny, and the 700 a month retirement pay is not bad either.

Terry

From: Ogoki
15-Dec-18
Retired at 50. Started working for myself. I got in too much demand as very few do what I do. Really enjoy working and the challenges, but other things I would rather do. First Social Security check next month. I don't want to use my retirement money . Want my SS while I can get it . Wife who teaches plans to wrap it up this spring . Her at 60 and me at 63 1/2 we feel we better do what we want to now. Health issues really scare us . Three friends our age dealing with heart issues and cancer. Who knows when one of our normal screening tests will come back bad.

My financial guys says 60 to 70 are your go go years . 70 to 75 are your slow to years and 75 on are your no go years. He says this on the average of his clients over the past 30 years. Like we all know there are exceptions. My Mom is 99 and still lives alone and drives her car .

From: Rob in VT
15-Dec-18
My wife retired this past January. I am 52 and will retire in 31months (yes I’m counting down, but do like my job).

The plan was to retire in Southern Colorado in a log home we had purchased 4 years ago. Unfortunately a forest fire reduced it to a bucket of ashes. We are now looking at where we want to retire to. Western Wyoming is a good possibility if we can find the right home that checks off most of our requirements.

Best of luck to you. It’s never too early to start planning!

From: Franklin
15-Dec-18
Come on Charlie Rehor…..Obama Democrats say NOBODY pays $20,000 a year for healthcare....that`s a myth....lol.

My advice to those that have done physical work their whole life and then retired. Don`t let yourself get soft. I know so many guys in the trades that slowed down after retiring and they just fell apart.

From: Olink
15-Dec-18
I'll be 60.25 years old 4 years from now. Come Jan 2023 if I have 2 bad days in a row at work I'm outta there.

From: Slate
15-Dec-18
3 more to go I will be 48. I have thought about waiting until I’m 50. We will see. Only get one mortal life.

From: jstephens61
15-Dec-18
April 1, 2019 will be the first day of my retirement. Looking forward to it and already have the ‘19 season planned out and approved by the wife.

From: Ogoki
15-Dec-18
Charlie Rehor is absolutely correct on the 20k health care costs. Just got quotes in October and everyone of them said that quote is for right now ,it's going up. By waiting until now ,if wife retires this spring ,we can stay on cobra thru school system for 14k. That would get me to 65. She can't draw SS and school retirement , but by waiting 4 years for school retirement ( instead of taking it next summer ,she can just quit and hold off taking her school retirement) she will get $800 more per month . In meantime she can draw SS from 62 to 65 ,to help pay for her healthcare until 65. So much to figure in.

People at 40 to 55 ,that think they will do this or that ,might have a rude awakening . I never in my wildest imagination thought healthcare would cost me 20k 13 years later, when I first retired at 50. Glad I saved and planned for the worst. Thankful I kept at it . Enjoyed the last 13 working for me and still had time to play.

A friend , who works for state just found out his wife will not be covered in insurance ,once he retires. Then his monthly premium goes up ,for his part . He said that busted their bubble .

From: yooper89
15-Dec-18
In about 38 years, yes.

From: MarkU
15-Dec-18
I've owned my own business since 1984, and it's been pretty successful. Turned 68 last October, still go to work but delegate the work out a lot more than I used to. The part I like is the income and the time off. Get to live in a wall tent for five weeks every fall elk hunting, travel to numerous states to hunt and fish when I want, yet still go to work because I really like what I do. My wife retired two years ago and travels the world. She even asks me if I want to go along, but I decline. If it doesn't involve hunting, fishing or visiting the kids, I just have little interest, but I've also been to a lot more places than she will ever get to. It also helps that I realized when I was about twenty that a once in a lifetime hunting trip could be done every year, and I've stuck to that philosophy my entire life, so now I stick to the easier stuff. So, in the traditional sense, I may never retire.

Terry (Coyote 65), I work on P-51's a lot, including Ole Yeller. Really like those planes.

From: jingalls
15-Dec-18
I left in July of this year at 55. I call it semi-retired. I have some rental property for income and a small hobby farm to hunt. Lots of hunting and fishing to do. Wife’s a teacher and she will go another 10 years...maybe!-)

From: cnelk
15-Dec-18
I should clarify that Im going to retire 'from this full time job'. My current employer doesnt pay into Social Security, so I may do something in the private sector for a few years to boost that up and then draw it when I turn 62. Since SS wont be my primary source of income [ I actually take a Windfall because I didnt pay into SS for 25+ years] I will consider it a bonus.

Or, I could be hired back for a couple days a week on 'Special Assignment'.

Lots of options.

From: Jaquomo
15-Dec-18
So true about insurance costs. I managed our AGI so our taxable income was just above poverty level. That kept the insurance premiums way down for a good marketplace plan we needed due to wife's health issues. I didn't make the rules, just play by them.

After my wife died I dropped Anthem like a hot rock and joined Liberty Health Sharing. $200 a month and $500 annual "unshared" amount. With the GoodRx phone app it saves up to 80% on occasional prescriptions. A pharmacist showed me that trick.

Every time we eat out with a coupon or get a senior discount, even a senior/no insurance dental discount, it's like making money.

From: JL
15-Dec-18
I checked out after 30 years in the USCG. Most of that was working on helo's fixin' and flyin' in them. I got my A&P licenses years ago just in case things went south in the CG. Had I played my cards right I could have retired at 47. Instead I finished my 30 at 50 yoa. We made sure we (actually me) went into retirement with no car or house payments...which we did. The wife was able to keep her job from the last place we lived and is able to work from home. She does very good and is finally vested in the company. She just got info'd she is getting a real good market adjustment....luckily it's where her job is at and not where we live. She thought about retiring until she got the news about the raise....now she is going to stick around for a while. We're blessed and doing ok. We're lucky having Tricare Prime insurance and dental insurance. If you have a major health issue like I did right after retiring, the insurance is priceless.

The biggest thing for me was making the psychological adjustment from being on the go all the time to waking up the Monday after I retired and sitting on the couch feeling like I need to be somewhere or in a meeting. It took me about a week or so to make that psychological transition from a work mindset to a retirement mindset. It's a strange feeling...at least for me it was. Good luck to anyone getting ready to retire.

Speaking of money savers....alot of businesses offer military or LEO/firefighter discounts. If you're not sure just ask. That is a huge money saver over the long haul.

From: Scoot
15-Dec-18
46 and no end in sight. I mostly like what I do so I see no need to worry too much about when to quit. Once I've had enough i'll hang it up. As long as I'm still trying to answer important questions in my field i'll keep doing so.

From: Sam S
15-Dec-18
Finally I can see light at the end of the tunnel Just turned 49 planning to bail out at 58 as long as nothing changes in the next 11 yrs about keeping insurance after retirement

From: yeager
15-Dec-18
Retired 6 years ago at 59.....it was a tough decision after doing something you loved doing for 37 years, flying airplanes, but being able to hunt any time, or visit family with no strings attached, was well worth it!

From: GLB
15-Dec-18
Plan on retiring this May.

From: Bob H in NH
15-Dec-18
We went back and forth, wanting to retire out west but health insurance is key.

Then a reorg hit, my group tripled with most of them in dc. They assigned me to run a 3 year transformation project, which gets me to 58 where they wI'll pay 50% health insurance for me.

Figured I'd try something. Asked if I could telework from wyoming. They said yes

So now we are not retiring but I am working the last 3 from wyoming

Almost as good

From: Screwball
15-Dec-18
57 planning 3-4 more years. My wife will retire in 2 years and be medicare eligible. I will have health insurance single plan covered through pension til medicare at 66.7. Both have 2/3 of regular pay pension and S.S. plus some IRA's. Looking forward to it. But am on the go for work so much it will be strange.

From: jstephens61
15-Dec-18
I would say that it’s never too late to start putting something back for retirement. Anything is better than nothing. I’m lucky, the State covers my insurance and the wife’s will cost us a minimal amount.

From: Owl
15-Dec-18
I don't believe I'm wired for retirement. Too many cautionary tales that hit close to home. The way I see it, I have about 12 years to carve out a niche that allows me to take 6-8 weeks off a year to hunt the critters I want to kill.

From: Native Okie
15-Dec-18
I’m retiring soon. Shooting for 2042. I’ll be 59 1/2 ;^)

From: copperman
15-Dec-18
6 years I'll be 52 and eligible ,,,,,,,

From: BOWUNTR
15-Dec-18
I retired at 50... Just turned 54. Lifetime medical. Very blessed. Cheers... Ed F

From: eddie c
15-Dec-18
Started my current job 28-1/2 years ago. Been putting money in a retirement account most of that time. Also have a pension plan with insurance. Turned 58 two weeks ago and going out the door the 31st. Several factors: sick Dad, sick wife and tired of the job.

15-Dec-18
I'm 40 and consider myself semi-retired as I only work 6 months a year. I'm no where near being able to cut out entirely as I have two girls who are about to turn 12 and 15 with private school payments now and college still in the future. But my job is not physical, I don't dislike it, and both sides of my family live a long time so I'm not too worried about it and will probably work like this for a long time, but I consider it sustainable. I made the choice to work longer and have more time off while I'm young 5 years ago and I've never been happier my entire life.

From: TreeWalker
16-Dec-18
No hurry to retire in my case. Have my health. I rarely set my alarm for the morning. Have a meaningful role at the company and compensation is very fair. Spouse is doing great in her career and is thinking about stepping aside from her job at 60. I enjoy working and building sales and operations teams. I also like the social aspect of my workplace. Helps me provide balance to my world.

From: pav
16-Dec-18
Just turned 57 last month and think about retirement every day! Figure I'm 3-5 years out unless life dumps something unexpected in my lap.

From: leftee
16-Dec-18
Retired at 53 over 20 yrs ago.Try to hunt,fish or do something I have a passion for daily.IMO a key to success for those married is to support your spouses passion(s). Stay active physically.Use it or lose it is the gospel.

From: BULELK1
16-Dec-18
Congrats Rob!

I am going to do a write-up at my 1 year Retired Anniversary in early January.

I have found out a lot and realized even more.

Good luck, Robb

From: peterk1234
16-Dec-18
What a great thread! It is interesting to read how many people have called it quits before 60. I think the common thread I am reading is that most who have done it are very satisfied with a simple life, and enjoying the outdoors certainly makes that possible.

I am 52 and think about it constantly. My wife and I would love to retire in Idaho, Montana or Wyoming, but my parents are here in Massachusetts. I cannot leave them behind. Also, trying to figure out how much is enough is difficult. With no corporate pensions, you need a pretty solid asset base to live off of. Social security is crap, and I only look at it as a way to pay for our health insurance and property taxes when we retire. Of course, getting out of New England could significantly reduce living costs, which is another reason to get out of here eventually.

I am self employed, so that adds another challenge. It is hard to press the off button and just leave it all behind. Balancing quality and quantity..... the greatest challenge for most of us I think. Pete

From: BC
16-Dec-18
I can go anytime now, just have to get mentaly prepared. I have a great job with very good compensation and benefits. Even have a generous pension with a cost of living increase built in. I might find out about going part time for awhile. I'll be 63 in April. You get into your sixties and time starts being more important than money.

From: Franzen
16-Dec-18
6 more months for me. I'll be 36 this month.

Wait... Where am I? What just happened? I blacked out there for a second.

From: Ogoki
16-Dec-18
I already added my two cents to this thread , but wanted to add this .

At 63 I can make more money BUT , I can’t make more time !!!!

My wife and I feel , as many of you do , these are very important years , to enjoy the fruits of our labor .

From: Forest bows
16-Dec-18
I retire every September but somehow find my way back to work about this time every year.

From: Dino
16-Dec-18
Just turned 50, been teaching for 25 yrs now. Good job, if u just had the students with which to deal...i find its getting harder to do, and I find myself yearning for longer whitetail and elk hunts in the fall. Mortgage is paid, wife likes to work...might do a few more years, then do something part time. Financially a fellow should work full time as long as possible, but I don't think I can go past 55...

From: Cornpone
16-Dec-18
I retired at 59 (2004) as an electrician/electronics technician working for a large company. The retirement package was too enticing! I started a side business doing electrical work but, after about a year, found out it got in the way of my hunting too much. I have been "fully" retired ever since.

From: Z Barebow
16-Dec-18
I am 53 and I think about retirement often. (Moreso after turning 50). Here is the weird thing, I love my job. I am content with my income and future employment is secure. I also have a small LLC which generates some extra income also. I am accruing ~ 5 weeks a year of PTO, so I have latitude to hunt and family vacations. My target is 67. But who knows? I have a daughter entering college and I would like to help her out. I also have good health care, but no way I want to COBRA the family policy. (Almost 3K a month for premium) After I retire, I suspect I can keep my LLC viable for 3-5 years after retirement if I need/choose to.

From: 12yards
16-Dec-18
I'm planning to work till I'm 60 years and 10 months. That will be October 2023. Five years out....unless I can afford it earlier. I was looking good until Trump started with the tariff deal, the FED started raising interest rates, and uncertainty hit the world economy. Now I'm not as confident.

16-Dec-18
Look at 2 years pulling the plug daughter will be out of college just got to figure out the medical first

From: Ambush
16-Dec-18
So how many of you guys that are "retired" in you're fifties, work part time or at a paid "hobby"?

And how many people out there retired in their early fifties or sooner and then went back to work because it just wasn't really financially feasible. I know guys that retired from good paying jobs with great benefits only to end up working at Home Depot, part time, "just for fun". That's not retired! And I am retired. I agreed to help out my old employer a little if they got really stuck, but thankfully those days are few and far between and none since February.

I have a lath, milling machine and metal fab equipment and a life time of acquired skills and have many little projects that could make some money. But I don't do anything that's not for friends and then only for free. I made three wall tent wood stoves for myself and friends and casual acquaintances have asked me to make them to sell. No thanks, I'm not working for five bucks an hour.

For my generation, in Canada anyway, the whole "Freedom 55" thing was a cruel joke that made investor's businesses prosper more than their clients.

From: BOWUNTR
16-Dec-18
I do taxidermy part time... because I love it. My wife does real estate part time, she loves it. We have our own schedules and do what we want, when we want to. Very blessed. Ed F

From: Rock
16-Dec-18
15 months left for me or at least that is my current plan.

Ambush, I am envious of your metal work equipment, I have been looking for a lath and would love a milling machine.

From: Russell
16-Dec-18
16 months and counting.

From: mtnview
16-Dec-18
Retired in 2014 at age 50 after 30 years with a gun n badge. I didn’t make the rules, I just followed them! I loved my career but I didn’t allow it to define me or create my identity.

Too young to sit around so I trap n hunt for Govt in TX near family and my only grandchild. I hunt n trap 300 days a year on my own schedule. I always said I’d retire as soon as I could and find something I’d do for free but someone would pay me to do it. I don’t need to have a JAY-OH-BEE, however I’d being doing it anyway somewhere....

As my friend “C” says, everyday is Saturday!

From: Tracker
16-Dec-18
I retired 2 years ago. Retired from the Fed Government after 30 years then worked another 12 years as contractor for them. To be honest I miss work and if it wasn't for the terrible commute I would most likely still be working. I enjoy retirement and keep busy hunting, fishing and golfing but I miss the camaraderie. I also carried a gun and badge.

From: trkyslr
16-Dec-18
I’ve considered it since it was 20 bahahaaaaa.... when I’m 50 I’m set but a few years until then...

I’ll be on same plan as ed probably!

From: AZ8
16-Dec-18
50 now. Federal employee. I could leave my current job at 56 and pull from my TSP. Unfortunately, can’t touch my personal ROTH until 59 1/2. Guess I could go work at some cushy job until I hit 60 then walk away for good. Will come down to health insurance costs.

Used to be a great job, but absolutely hate it now.. 56 can’t come soon enough.....so not sure what to do. Got 6 years to figure something out. Lol

16-Dec-18
After 32 years in education, I officially retired at the conclusion of the 2016-17 school year. However I went back as a "consultant" to complete some hours for my best pension option and got my first pension check a year ago December. I've also been working a second career that keeps me busy but not nearly as demanding as public education with a 5:15am alarm five days a week.

So I guess I am "semi-retired" and enjoying much more freedom in my schedule. My wife worked in a medical field for 34 years and was done in 2014, a few years ahead of me. Her widowed mom wasn't doing well living alone any longer, so she moved in shortly after I finished my education career. We don't have much debt and not an abundance of money, but God has been good. My project for 2019 is to find a piece of hunting ground to call my own with a little nestegg I have been saving for many years. Been a while since I hunted out-of-state as well, so there is always something to look forward to.

From: BigOzzie
17-Dec-18
At 51 I am pondering that right now, when will I retire.

I meet all the criteria set by my employer

My pension will be good.

Wife is still willing to work and cover insurance for "a while"

house is close to paid off

I will retire, then take on a new job of some sort.

I have a small llc business that would keep me busy and involved in archery.

hmmmmmmmmm, I honestly have no idea, soon likely, or maybe not, I don't know.

oz

From: goelk
17-Dec-18
Im 65 and set a goal at 70 to retired. Two girls in college takes money.

From: cnelk
17-Dec-18
Something Ive done for the past year+ to prepare for retirement is set my monthly income budget to my pension amount [including ins & taxes].

This way it wont be such an adjustment when the time comes. So far, so good!

From: GhostBird
17-Dec-18
Turned 60 last October and still have a few productive years left. I like what I do for a living... building space hardware for NASA is pretty cool.

From: GotBowAz
17-Dec-18
cnelk, thats great advice. Im 57, will retire at 60. lots of great advice here the most important one I think I read was keeping busy after retirement. Seems i've seen a lot of retired guys just kind of wither away both physically and mentally.

From: South Farm
17-Dec-18
The second I turn 59.5 years old I'm DONE! Take this job and shove it;)

From: JSW
17-Dec-18
I've noticed one thing for sure while reading this post. There sure are a lot of old farts on bowsite. And by old farts, I mean one day older than me. If you're younger than me then you're just a kid.

Ambush asked a valid question. How many go back to work or work part time when retiring early. Like I said before, I'm not retired, I'm unemployed. When I quit working, I was 46. When we sold our businesses, I kept most of my shop equipment and set up a small welding shop. I try to work about a month a year doing something in my shop that brings in money. I take on small welding jobs and do some taxidermy work. I don't know that I would call that not being retired. Doing this covers some of my hunting expenses and I really enjoy it. I think Charlie mentioned that you have to make sure you don't let yourself get soft. I work out 5 mornings a week unless I'm hunting or fishing. I have so many projects that I want to complete, I doubt if I will get caught up before I die. I wouldn't change any of it.

17-Dec-18
I am 56 and plan on working another 3-5 years. I have enough to retire now, no debt, no kids, etc.

My wife is also a professional.

My worry is that I have been chasing something for so long, I am not sure what I would do if I quit chasing. I am not good at slowing down. In addition, I hunt a lot and go to several UFC events a year. I did 10-12 hunts in 2018. I currently have 3 booked for 2019.

I am not sure what I would do with all of the free time.

I am starting my deceleration plan and hope to be able to teach or consult in 4-5 years. I have been considering getting on a board or two.

The next chapter scares to hell out of me. I think I am afraid that if I slow down I might fall over and die.

How did you slow down?

From: LaGriz
17-Dec-18
+1 on cnelk's plan, "Something I've done for the past year+ to prepare for retirement is set my monthly income budget to my pension amount [including ins & taxes]. This way it wont be such an adjustment when the time comes. So far, so good!"

I'll be 64 in July and I both amazed and I'm pressed so many can retire before 62 or 63. My Lady is older with next to no retirement and I kind of need my health care from work. Broke my shoulder in September and have a long rehab in front of me. Depending on the results of my Physical Therapy, I may pull-the-plug as soon as April or May. That is of course if my employer doesn't do it to me sooner. LOL! I will live with the high cost of COBRA insurance for my last year before turning 65. If congress can pass a replacement for AHC that would be a big help but I will not hold my breath on that. Health care is my biggest speed bump. On the financial side I have done very well. Have two IRAs , two 401 K's, one Roth, and also non-retirement accounts. Additionally, I own my crappy home and "I"M DEBT FREE!" as Dave Ramsey loves to shout. It is truly a wonderful feeling to be able to say that.

LaGriz

From: Brotsky
17-Dec-18
Planning for age 60, 17 years to go. Seems like a lifetime from now but it goes by in the blink of an eye I know. We'll be sitting really good by then as long as we keep the right folks in office. If we don't then we might all be looking for work!

From: ben h
17-Dec-18
Lucky bastards. I'm 42 and took the took the 8-9 year college path, because "graduate school is never a bad idea" (F#$% that), so I've got some catching up to do and probably won't be able to think about that till 60's assuming I don't die of a heart attack from work 1st.

Does anyone have Dave Ramsey's recipe for beans and rice or rice and beans for when you become sick of beans and rice? That will help with savings and might help me live longer too......or maybe it just would feel longer.

From: Jaquomo
17-Dec-18
It took me about 4 months to "slow down" after pulling the trigger. I had a pretty intense job where I was on a plane almost every week flying all over the world for one hour meetings. The $$$ stakes were high, my performance had Wall Street implications, and pressure from senior execs was unrelenting.

Now I love my lifestyle and the slower pace. Zero stress. Today was pretty typical - had coffee and read the paper with the a.m. news on while looking for moose out the window. Spent a couple hours organizing stuff for an upcoming fishing trip to Chile. Took the dog for a hike and then worked out. Now about to go fishing for a few hours before heading to friend's house for cocktails and dinner. Some days I take a nap, some days not. My girlfriend's life pace is very similar except she doesnt nap and goes to the gym, where I work out at home.

After working for 50 straight years (age 10-60) I never really knew what it was like to truly "love life". I loved parts of it and enjoyed much, but this past four years has been everything I dreamed of in retirement.

From: Zim
17-Dec-18
I'm almost 60 but my retirement was stolen by the unemployed welfare ex 12 years ago. However, I still think I'm lucky as long as my job holds out. It's basically like being semi-retired working part-time, complete independence, extremely flexible hours/schedule, but with full benefits. No stress. I intend to ride it out until they don't want me any more.

From: Jaquomo
17-Dec-18
Just to add, I'm also on three Boards, president of one, manage two big fisheries (volunteer), organize kids fishing derbies, work with a wounded veteran fly fishing organization to host a fishing day every year, volunteer at the archery club, do bowhunting banquet speeches, and write a few magazine features. So it's not like I'm sitting around picking my toenails. It's just at my own pace, doing things I enjoy and which are rewarding.

From: BOWNUT
17-Dec-18
I'm 62 the wife is 65 the house is paid for and we have one car payment and no kids. I just can't get over how much medical costs will be. I will wait till I turn 65 so then I can get medicare. My wife is going to retire in three months. Its going to be hard for me to go to work after she retires and I'm not sure how long I will last. This stock market is not helping. I must say I love working.

From: kstout
17-Dec-18
I retired 3/13/2009, 2 months before my 54th birthday. I worked 35 years for the phone company. I've been enjoying it every since.

From: Dale06
17-Dec-18
I retired at 61 ( 6.5 years ago) after 39 years at a pretty stressful corporate job. My advice- Do it as early as you can, within reason (don’t retire at in your 40s) Make sure you have enough money, be honest to yourself about that. I know people that had to go back to work, at a crappy low pay job. Maintain your health, eat right and exercise Realize that it is an adjustment for you, and your spouse Have fun.

From: Ogoki
17-Dec-18
After reading all of these responces, it appears like most are set , BUT THE BIG BUT IS HEALTHCARE . The unknown for many of us ,until Medicare .

From: Bob H in NH
17-Dec-18
Healthcare sucks. I'm 54, almost 55. Nest egg is on the edge of plenty. Healthcare is thw killer. Y company will pay 50% if I stay til 58. That's the plan

From: Stix
17-Dec-18
I just retired June of this year. I'm 55

From: MPN
17-Dec-18
46 and part time for a couple years now. No debt. Fortunate to be in a profession that allows a good deal of flexibility with regard to workload. Plan on another 10-15 years of 10 days per month to add to retirement nest egg, maintain benefits and fund my hunting addiction. Life is good!

17-Dec-18
"BUT THE BIG BUT IS HEALTHCARE . The unknown for many of us ,until Medicare ."

Heathcare was my second biggest concern, only eclipsed by the mortgage payment. I'm retiring 31 Dec. 1 Jan, I go on Medicare. Since I'm retired military, my TRICARE Select converts to TRICARE FOR LIFE. That fills my need for a medicare supplement, with no premium. The house will be paid off in Feb. As someone wisely posted earlier, I can't buy time, so even though such a huge decision creates some anxiety, I'm beyond ready!

From: SDHNTR(home)
17-Dec-18
Retirement planning is my business. It’s most of what I do all day, every day. It brings a smile to my face to see so many on the right path here. Trust me, that’s rare, given the average American in not in such a position. I’m not going to offer any specific advice here publicly but suffice it to say that the key to accomplishing your retirement goal is having a defined, disciplined and written plan in place. You should KNOW, not guess, exactly how much you need to be saving annually and how your investments should be allocated to achieve your retirement goal! It’s far too important to guess or hope for the best! Put a plan in place and stick to it!

From: Ogoki
17-Dec-18
Wyobullshooter, if you look back in earlier posts the same one who posted "But the big but is healthcare " is also the same one who said " I can't buy more time " Ogoki . I have spent considerable time thinking about all this retirement stuff . Lots of time to think while driving from job to job . Some are 200 miles apart . LOL

17-Dec-18
Ha! Like I said, you’re a wise man. ;-)

From: Proline
17-Dec-18
I'm 55 and shooting for 62. Stock market currently seems to have other plans for. Worst case is I semi retire and do something more fun a few days a week if I can figure out the medical insurance aspect.

17-Dec-18
When I was 58 I drew the elk area I wanted... Told them I needed all of 4 weeks in Sept, they said I could have 2,,,, filed my papers,,, went and shot my best elk,,,, not getting younger.... been thru a lot in my life,,,Military etc, like others........ Never looked back, and now I am 68,,,,, best decision of my life....

You will do in retirement, what you have done before, but you will have more time,,,,

YOU CAN NOT BUY TIME......You might have a 70.0000 dollar truck, and this and that, so what, your working your ass off, and having little time..... I WOULD RATHER HAVE THE TIME

My buddy just died,,, oh yeah, he was going to work till he was 65 and I said why? well now he is dead at 63,,, his job killed him,,,, all that stress for what,,,,,,,, No one else could run the business but him, I told him bull shit, there is always someone else,,, a sad story

From: Longbeard
17-Dec-18
8 years, 6 months and 14 days.......

From: Double Creek
17-Dec-18
41, self employed and love what I do.. retirement isn’t really on my radar yet. Maybe in 20 yrs or so.

From: Santee
17-Dec-18
Very good posts everyone! I have been adjusting to a completely different life style (retirement) since the end of 2017. For some of us, it does take a while to wake up and enjoy it. You need be ready for "half the paycheck and twice the wife!" Also, you may find yourself spending more time with doctors and more money at the pharmacy too. Good hunting to all you retirees and younger guys too!

From: cnelk
17-Dec-18
"half the paycheck and twice the wife!"

Now that sh!t is funny! I dont care who you are :)

You poor married bastards :)

From: midwest
18-Dec-18
ditto, cnelk....that made me lol!

From: elkstabber
18-Dec-18
"...twice the wife..." HAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!

From: air leak
18-Dec-18
I turned 60 on Dec 5, 2016. I retired Dec 22, 2016, after 41 years at UPS.

Ice fishing, open water fishing, spring turkey, golf, more fishing, more golf, yard work, watch our two granddaughters as needed, bow hunting. I have plenty to keep me busy.

I was asked to come work for my Teamster local, training drivers for their CDL A. One thousand bucks per week, on top of my pension.

No thank you, I told them.

As others have stated...you can't buy time.

From: 4point97
18-Dec-18
34 yrs old here....I think about it everyday. Probably about 31 more years to go.

From: South Farm
18-Dec-18
"34 yrs old here....I think about it everyday. Probably about 31 more years to go."

Hell of a lot more than that if we don't secure our borders. Somebody's gotta pay that bill. Middle class is gonna be hurting big time 30 years from now if something doesn't change. My advice is squirrel away every penny you can and stay diversified, keep your costs low, and try to stem becoming a "have not" when the day comes. You don't need to be rich by any means, but you want to be in a position of not suffering financially like so many will be by then.

From: Drummer Boy
18-Dec-18
Groundhunter,you are sooo right.I retired just short of 52 in 2006.Scary at first,thought I was going to have to go back to work because of the down turn in 09.A good friend of mine just retired just found out he has cancer.

From: Ambush
18-Dec-18
Drummer Boy, and other young retiree's, do you or did you still do work for pay after retiring? I also suspect ninety nine percent of people that actually retired by their early fifties were not regular wage earners.

From: dizzydctr
18-Dec-18
I will be 70 in June(where did all that time go?) and have deferred social security until then. I enjoy a paycheck and not having to worry about money, and have no plans to retire at the present time. I would like to take a week off every month if I can get some help here at work, but more than likely will never happen. I have told my staff to send me home when they feel I am not doing a good job. Until then, I plan to keep at it.

From: cnelk
18-Dec-18
Define - 'Regular Wage Earners'

From: Ogoki
18-Dec-18
Ambush, Retired from my job of 30 years at 50. Company changed hands and I was only one that was kept. I was the customer service man. Could not stand to see how the , very good loyal customers were treated. New owner had his own ideas. My ideas were honesty and fairness. I left . Moved my retirement to good safe investments . Was only going to work enough to not touch retirement. Ended up being very busy about 6 months of the year. Bought acreage and cabin and still maxed out my retirement contributions every year. I am cutting back more in coming year. Realistically, I would not want to be 100% retired. Still like my work , but if I get up and decide to go to my cabin, work in my garden or whatever I just do it . Some mornings bow hunt , come home and work a few hours . Take on a service call ,when I want to or just say I am busy. I have a niche job . Some morning I ache with arthritis , but when I get busy ,it goes away. My three Labs are always ready to help in the garden or go for a walk.

From: TrapperKayak
18-Dec-18
Going in just over a year, on my 64th BD. Had enough.

From: Drummer Boy
18-Dec-18
Ambush I was a fishing guide for two years,just wanted to try it.I did have two rental properties but sold them.I will say this though I have a real passion for hunting and fishing and hit the road for a long time doing things I did not have time for when I was working.If I did not have that burning desire I would have stayed working.

From: Ambush
18-Dec-18
cnelk, I'd define regular wage earners as hourly rate or salary without profit sharing or added commission. Construction, tradesman, equipment operators, bank employee, retail and basically anyone working for a set wage for someone else, ei. not a business owner. Some people have been fortunate (or smart) enough to be tied to a company's good fortune. Commission sales or shares can provide a huge windfall.

I'm intrigued by "regular" guys that can work thirty years and have enough to live well for another thirty plus years without working for pay again. Where and how do you live? Do you have a small house on an acreage where you cut your own firewood, grow a substantial amount of produce and walk to fish and hunt? Does your "contentment quotient" allow you to just putter around home, sit on the porch and not yearn for more? Do you live where taxes and cost of living are next to nothing and cheap utilities?. Do you have a spouse that still works or does one or both of you have very good company pensions?

I guess, in my view, if you are still getting paid money for doing something for someone else, then you are not really retired. Whether you enjoy it or dictate the hours or not.

From: air leak
18-Dec-18
Ambush..I live in CT. Things are not cheap. Our mortgage has been paid off 5 years ago.

If I worked longer, my pension would increase every year, but I had enough. I bought my Teamster Retiree benefits at 185 per month, soon to be going down to 177.

My wife is a HS principal and she has 2 1/2 school years left before she retires. She will go on my benefits package.

Fortunately, I don’t have to work. As stated above, I turned down 1000 bucks per week, on top of my pension, to train drivers for their CDL A.

You can’t buy time.

From: Ambush
18-Dec-18
Air Leak, I can easily see your planning and position as viable and even enviable. Good for you, good luck and enjoy the fruits.

It’s some of the other fellows I’m very curious about. What is the main “enabler” ?

From: cnelk
18-Dec-18
Something to remember is that each one's definition of retirement will vary,

Are you saying that 39 years of working isnt enough to 'enable' a regular wage earner?

From: Jaquomo
18-Dec-18
Ambush, I think I'm one of those "regular guys". Have had jobs since age 10, paper route, working at the golf course after school, catching and selling bait. Worked to pay my way through college and into a field (Park Ranger and Naturalist) I didn't like after awhile. Quit that and took a job as a ditch digger laying cable TV lines for minimum wage.

From that point on I started taking on extra tasks, showing value to my employer, asking for promotions. Then my (now) ex-wife blew all of our savings on an ill advised venture, we got divorced, and at age 40 I was broke. Zero savings.

I left a salary job in operations and consulting and "sold" my way into a cable TV technology sales career. It seemed to me that those guys had a good life, nice cars, etc.. I took on big, difficult accounts nobody wanted and turned them around. We lived frugally, and my new wife managed our home and finances and invested our extra money while I was on airplanes every week. She didn't work at a job after we married. As a "lone wolf" I was able to work from hunting camps wherever I could get cell service, so I got to hunt a lot.

We saved and invested in diversified vehicles besides just trusting the stock market (ex.. bought a small cheap rental house and sold it for 4X), made good decisions. I continued to take job risks with rewards if I succeeded, and as when I was a paperboy or ditch digger, I tried to be the very best I could be at whatever I was doing, and was recognized for it. I watched too many around me satisfied and unwilling to give extra effort, so I asked to be given the hard challenges.

After the '08 crash, with no pension or inheritance to look forward to, we moved a 401K (I changed companies) into an annuity with a good return and lifetime guaranteed payout. I know many don't like annuities, but for me it will provide a great "pension" with no concern about running out of money.

By my age 60 we had just enough, and with the annuity cashing out at my age 68 and Social Security looming we knew we could live comfortably. We paid off the house and cabin, pulled the trigger, and never looked back.

So it was a combination of working hard, taking career risks, living below our means, planning and investing wisely, and honestly, having good luck and decent health. The only glitch in the plan was that my wife died way too soon and didn't get to enjoy retirement with me. That should be a lesson to anyone delaying retirement when they have the means to pull the trigger sooner. Life carries no guarantees.

From: grossklw
18-Dec-18
Currently 29, with my current trajectory I should be done by 40. I don't have some crazy high salary, I'm a PT and my wife is an RN, we do well but not as high as some would expect given our education. We max out rothIRA's, throw just enough into stock market to get my company match, and most every other penny I can scrounge goes into real estate and buying rentals (other than hunting haha!). Once I leave my normal W2 job and do real estate full-time I'll have access to my 401k to continue buying more and more real estate, albeit through a different vehicle. I either own or co-own 41 units, I need to get that number near 100 before I can start thinking about using some of my cash flow for anything other than more real estate purchases. 40 may be aggressive, but I'm already to a point where I have completely replaced my wife's salary if I wanted to actually start taking my cash flow. I'm with Lou, I have some in the stock market, but my real estate still cash flows the same whether stock market goes up or down by 10% (equity is a whole different argument but I'm not getting into that here). I've heard Newberg say enough times you'll run out of time before you run out of money and I'm trying to do as much as I can earlier in life.

From: APauls
18-Dec-18
Prob think about it too much. I'll prob be winding down as my wife ramps up. Seems like we both have goals that are 10-15 years away. Her career finally getting to where she wants, and I'd hope to just take more time off, but it should keep the income stable :) She's too much smarter than me so it's ok.

From: Ambush
18-Dec-18
cnelk, I'm not "saying" anything, I'm asking out of curiosity. I'm not being envious or accusatory either, or at least not trying to be. As a very young man, I had a friend from Georgia and I went there a few times. He had an older brother that had done his tour and came home to develop a distrust for all things government. He lived on a patch of swamp, in a trailer with no services at the end of a very long driveway. He lived on game and fish, regardless of seasons and grow a big garden which included his "cash crop". That's probably not possible today in many places.

And Jaq is a classic example of where sweat, drive and smarts meets opportunity. I'd rate him a 1% 'er in the working man's world. Some don't have the drive and many can't shoulder the risk. My Dad always said, "If you can't afford to lose, you can't afford to gamble."

I work in an location where wages have been traditionally high with great benefits and pensions. I've known quite a few guys that retired at 55 with their full pensions and just carried right on living like they did while employed. A few years later I run into them, usually in big box retail or a low paying part time job and they claim to be just working for fun or they are just bored at home. It's almost always BS.

I got kicked out of school and left home at age fifteen and went to work full time. I had an opportunity, at age nineteen, to get my high school diploma and some trades training. A year later I was better employed, advancing my skills and making myself worthwhile to my employers. I pretty much have worked more than full time from fifteen to sixty two and then a year of three quarter time, then tapered off to nothing at age sixty five. I have no company pension, but my company did pay me based on how much I made for them and they were fair and honest employers.

As with grossklw above, just quitting your regular day job wouldn't be considered being retired, not to me anyway. Not if you have to put substantial hours into looking after your investments.

I think it was Dwight Schuh that said "The only people that can say "I could have" are the people that already did." He was talking about hunting, of course, but it may also apply to some of the "I'm out at fifty" guys. Only time will tell.

From: grape
18-Dec-18
Retired at 55. The smartest move I ever made. You can’t buy time. Best fifteen years of my life. My wife asks, “what are you going to do today?” My response is,” I’ll start with this or that.....then whatever I want”. Stay active, get off the couch, and remember everyday is a gift.

From: Jaquomo
18-Dec-18
Rod, thank you for the compliment. That means a lot, because I always strived to be the best at whatever. When I was a ditch digger, I dug the best ditch.

When I was settled into my first real sales job, it was cushy and fun. I drove a company car around in CO, WY, MT, and NM servicing a territory, traveled with a fly rod, hunted with some customers, bought dinners and beers with them. It was comfortable, great expense account, paid fairly well. I could have done it for another 25 years.

Then a position opened up to manage and try to grow our company's business with the biggest cable TV company in the world. That company didn't do much with us because of a senior management spat years before. They couldn't recruit anyone to take that frustrating position with big pressure, stress, and high failure potential. My older mentor came to me and said, "You can do this job. You just don't know it". He advocated for me with senior execs and they promoted me to do it. That became my mantra for the rest of my career, and the decision turned out to be life-changing.

From: cnelk
18-Dec-18
My dad had a saying... "You cant miss what you never had"

I dont plan on missing much.

I also started working at a young age. But when growing up on a farm, you dont have a choice in that matter.

When I was a senior in HS, I was living on my own, had a herd of cattle and a handful of horses. Sold them after graduation and went off doing construction and OTR truck driving. Six years of that, and I was tired of the N. Minnesota winters, small town gossip and got the hell out of a dead-end life.

Moved to Colorado in '88 and never looked back. Bought a house in '89 [still live there] and have a ton of equity in it.

Worked hard at my job for 25 years, put 2 kids thru college, hunted and fished a lot, saved up my awesome State pension and now I figure its time to quit working for someone else. Tired of the politics and BS.

If I decide to do something after this so-called 'retirement' it wont be called a job, I can tell you that.

From: Ambush
18-Dec-18
""You can do this job. You just don't know it". And the road forks at the point where some choose to find out.

Grape, I know what you mean about "this and that, then whatever." I'm the epitome of the DIY'er and pack rat. Apparently some people experience FOMO (fear of missing out) while my wife says I am plagued by FOTO (fear of throwing out) I'm cleaning out a cupboard I put up in my garage about 28 years ago. I found an old can full of screws and bolts salvaged from renos and equipment from my previous house. Happy to say the healing from FOTO is working and after sorting through the can I was able to throw about a third of it out!

I also re-found some old truck running boards that I'll cut into steps for some lightweight aluminum climbing sticks. Just have to find an efficient way to cut standoffs out of discarded hydraulic pump housings. I'll likely be paying myself about a buck an hour when all is said and done, but hey, the ice is too thin to fish and the conditions are not good yet to hunt preds.

From: LaGriz
18-Dec-18
Will be 64 in July.

Need health care. Especially so after dislocating and breaking my Rt. shoulder. Had surgery on Oct. 1st, rehab 3 times a week, only returned to work (restricted duty) on December 4th. Have a long rehab in front of me. This might delay any retirement to this spring or beyond.

I too am surprised at the number of guys who think they can retire in there 50's and early 60's. Some guys are lucky with a younger and still-working wife who can cover them on their medical insurance. My woman is older, on Medicare, and unfortunately has little income (dam the luck). I like cnelk's plan to try and budget a life style to what they estimate there income will be at retirement. This makes much sense to me.

Have saved and invested well. Own my own crappy home and "I'm debt free". I can't overstate how wonderful it is to be able to say that! Looking to possibly relocate. Should be able to follow my hobbies and enjoy an outdoor lifestyle. Seasonal or part time work would be a plus. I would like to be more active in the RMEF and in Traditional Archery organization(s).

I won't be going sheep hunting every year, and I may not be a globetrotter either. I will however be able to afford a comfortable retirement and take a few domestic trips each year. Looking for that "golden spot" to settle in that checks all my boxes. Mountains, Mild weather, good hunting & fishing opportunities, access to quality healthcare, and a culture that welcomes former non-residents. I'm a conservative, registered independent, gun owner, archer, camper, cook, hiker, paddler who happens to be white of Anglo descent. If my new home happens to be so attractive that family and friends would feel inclined to visit me, this too would be a plus. LaGriz

From: Ambush
18-Dec-18
cnelk, if my math is right, you're about forty nine years old. The next ten to fifteen years should be and can be the best years of your life. Young enough to still be strong and fearless, but old enough to make the best of that strength with experience. Some people are just programmed to take big bites.

At 65, I'll be happy to have 1/3 the fun that Pual@thefort does!!

18-Dec-18
It's absolutely amazing and all of the MID 50's I am reading here. I am 40 and will be fully eligible with a pension and 401 and maybe a touch of social security at age 56.5 and I thought I had something unique and special! Now, I work in the private sector so I'm wondering how many military and cops and firefighters we have here saying mid 50s??

From: grossklw
18-Dec-18
Ambush- I would agree with your assessment, not necessarily retired, financially independent is the word everyone uses at my age for some reason or another. I'll be working because I want to, not because I'm reliant on it for a paycheck. And real estate will be that vehicle for me. It will obviously always have some hands-on element, which I very much enjoy (more so than my job as a PT which came with 6 figures of student loan debt). And at some point a nice 1031 exchange for some cushy apartment complex with low returns will be fine with me as I ride off into the sunset...or at least that's how it supposed to go. You guys in your 60's that have worked your ass off in the trades deserve the nice pensions

From: cnelk
18-Dec-18
Ambush - You were close, just 6 years shy. I'll be 55 in just over a month.

Ive been fortunate that since my employer doesnt pay into Social Security, Ive been able to take my investments and rollover it and turn some of my years of SS into my pension plan. No penalty. And I dont have to wait until 59 1/2 to be able to use my investments as they are now part of my pension and increased years of service [more $$$] into my monthly pension plan - for the rest of my life - in my mid-50s!

Even tho I worked 25+ years at my job, my pension will show I worked 30!

Then, when I turn 62, I will draw some SS off of my ex-wife's benefit. As I qualify for ex- spousal Social Security benefit [married 10+ years, not remarried]

Ya gotta have a plan.

So yes, the next 10+ years I am really looking forward to!

This has been a great discussion

From: Ambush
18-Dec-18
“You were close, just six years shy.” What do you expect from a man that got his whole high school in just a few months. lol.

From: Mike-TN
18-Dec-18

Mike-TN's embedded Photo
Mike-TN's embedded Photo
I can totally understand the desire of many to get out as early as possible. I’m taking a little different approach....at 53 I have a pretty good job and am hoping it will last to full retirement age for me which is 67. I went Dall Sheep hunting in ‘17 and Tahr this year and plan to do as much mountain hunting as I can until my legs stop working. Some of these hunts are expensive but I don’t mind working a couple extra years to make some memories that will last forever. I did 4 hunts this year (NZ Tahr, CO goat, NM elk, NV deer) and plan to do 3 or 4 per year as long as I can. Postponing retirement allows me to do it. I get 27 PTO days per year which helps. I have enjoyed this thread and hearing about other’s plans Mike

From: bullelk
18-Dec-18
225 more days; I’ll be 59.

From: Rob in VT
18-Dec-18
Ambush,

I am 52 and a regular wage earner. Been at my company for 30.5 years. 31 months to go before retirement. I saved diligently from my early 20s into a 401k plan. I am also fortunate to have a company pension so I will get 60% of my salary when I retire. The company will also continue to pay 50% of my health insurance for me and my wife. Add Social Security to that and things will be great.

Now let’s add icing on the cake . . . My wife just retired after 34 years and also has a 401k, pension, and Social Security. We are debt free and have been for several years. Even put 2 kids through college.

So to answer your question, NO I will not be working after retirement. I will model my retirement years after Charlie Rehor!

Cheers

From: jstephens61
18-Dec-18
In 99 days it will be March 28, my last day. Got remarried 22 years ago and we decided to plan for the future. I had my state pension, started a Deferred Comp plan; she started putting 15% plus 6% match into a 401k. We squirreled away any extra in a Roth. Always planned on jumping when she turned 59 1/2. This year we found out she could go at 55, next year,with no penalty, so that’s the plans. State is offering a buy out which for me is a sweet deal. After 30 years, my insurance is covered and hers is $130 a month. Why the hell wouldn’t I go? We saved and planned and now we can play.

From: Huntosolo
18-Dec-18
Very informative thread-thank you! Bowsiters a hypothetical for you: family ranch you grew up on, hunted, and has tremendous sentimental value is now being encroached (zoning, water rights legal & property taxes $) upon. The sale of property would accelerate and secure your retirement. What do you do?

From: jstephens61
18-Dec-18
If it’s not what you remember or where you want to retire to, I’d sell.

18-Dec-18
It would depend on two factors...was I still able to hunt the animals/birds that I wanted to hunt, and exactly how much would it accelerate my retirement.

I may be misreading your post, but it sounds like the only thing you’ll be hunting there now are memories. If that’s the case, I’m with jstephens. I’d sell and start planning my retirement.

From: Drummer Boy
19-Dec-18
mike~TN, totally understand with the sheep hunts.I gave up 42 days off a year.In my case not enough.My company had profit sharing put in 6% and thay matched it,then there was the end of the year bonus it was up to 20%.With my rentals I never really paid a morgage.I bought some hunting land was also paid of by the rentals.I also drove my trucks for 10 to 12 years.All I ever did for hunting was diy so that is how I ended up being retired at 51.

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