Steven Rinella Video on Trichinosis
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
DL 13-Aug-19
jingalls 14-Aug-19
MichaelArnette 14-Aug-19
Franklin 14-Aug-19
Huntcell 14-Aug-19
midwest 14-Aug-19
BOHUNTER09 14-Aug-19
Elite 1 14-Aug-19
wild1 14-Aug-19
sir misalots 14-Aug-19
Surfbow 14-Aug-19
APauls 14-Aug-19
Franklin 14-Aug-19
SaddleReaper 14-Aug-19
DL 14-Aug-19
Cazador 14-Aug-19
smarba 14-Aug-19
Franklin 14-Aug-19
Bake 14-Aug-19
DL 14-Aug-19
OFFHNTN 15-Aug-19
Will 16-Aug-19
APauls 16-Aug-19
MichaelArnette 19-Aug-19
smarba 20-Aug-19
mainecheesehead 20-Aug-19
Grey Ghost 20-Aug-19
Busta'Ribs 20-Aug-19
Pig Doc 20-Aug-19
drycreek 21-Aug-19
Slate 23-Aug-19
huntskifishcook 23-Aug-19
RogBow 23-Aug-19
Matt 23-Aug-19
Franklin 24-Aug-19
From: DL
13-Aug-19

DL's Link
Video on him getting it. Holy crap talk about a lot of larvae in that meat!!

From: jingalls
14-Aug-19
Love that guy! Great video! Thanks for posting!!!

14-Aug-19
That’s funny

From: Franklin
14-Aug-19
Always deep freeze your bear meat before eating. There is a duration scale of days at certain temps below 0 that will kill the Trich, depending on how low your freezer goes….along with cooking of course.

From: Huntcell
14-Aug-19
so he will always be carrying around those in his muscles until a zombie eats him then there stomach acid will release them into their system. Yuk!

From: midwest
14-Aug-19
WOW!

From: BOHUNTER09
14-Aug-19
This used to be common when people fed their hogs meat scraps. It’s the reason pork has always had a recommendation to cook thoroughly. It’s not very likely that modern pork production methods have those issues.

From: Elite 1
14-Aug-19
It can also be transmitted through cuts in your hands when processing.

From: wild1
14-Aug-19
Freezing alone will NOT kill trich. in wild game. It might suffice for domestic pork, but for wild game you better cook it well (about 165 degrees should do it).

From: sir misalots
14-Aug-19
Burn everything 180 degree internal temp

From: Surfbow
14-Aug-19
Freezing does not necessarily kill the types of trichinella that wild game can carry. Must cook it!

From: APauls
14-Aug-19
Wow, crazy to think that he’s a carrier lol

From: Franklin
14-Aug-19
You guys are correct about "killing" Trich technically. But deep freezing prevents the parasite from entering YOUR body. As I stated....this along with cooking is your best defense. The temp needed is not as high as you think but as Steve found out, you MUST cook every piece to that temp....not just parts of it.

From: SaddleReaper
14-Aug-19
Is it safe to say only carnivores or omnivores carry?

From: DL
14-Aug-19
I hear people saying they make jerky out of bear meat and I’m very skeptical.

From: Cazador
14-Aug-19
Reconfirms my thoughts on donation and states that don't require salvage.

From: smarba
14-Aug-19
So can one have bear meat tested? And can it test negative, but there be positive larvae in other parts of the meat?

I have known about this and killed my first bear last fall. I've been diligent about cooking it and testing it to 165+ with meat thermometer for at least 5 min as online instructions all seem to say; however, this video definitely makes me more paranoid...

From: Franklin
14-Aug-19
Yes.....any predator can get Trich. It has showed up in Mtn Lion also. I made wild game sausage commercially using bear and boar. After discussing this issue with a lab rat I went to the fail safe of deep freezing AND proper cooking. That is why I don`t eat predators and stopped making sausage out of predators and wild pigs. I won`t make sausage, jerky or canned goods for anyone but my family and me.

It`s virtually non-existent in todays domestic pork production. Recently the FDA even dropped the required cooking temp from 165 to 145.

From: Bake
14-Aug-19
Wow. Good to know

From: DL
14-Aug-19
I’ve taken several bears and we’ve eaten them. I’m supposed to go this year to a friends place to eliminate a large boar. Thinking about these things being in the meat is a little unsettling to me. Not a fan of ticks fleas or internal parasites.

From: OFFHNTN
15-Aug-19
Yeh......I don't want that.

From: Will
16-Aug-19
Well, I feel so much better about cooking stuff to shoe leather now :)

From: APauls
16-Aug-19
So if Trichinosis is painful to a human is it painful to a bear? As in do they experience the same symptoms we do? Might be a stupid question but I'm not a biologist.

19-Aug-19
Smarba, I’m sure you can get the meat tested but I would not recommend it as most wild bear populations have incredible rates of trichinosis. I believe Ontario had like 90% in a study I read?

From: smarba
20-Aug-19
Thx MichaelArnette. So it's likely a particular bear meat has it. Driving home the point to cook well done and test with meat thermometer. I just didn't have a feel for if it was 1 out of 100 bears that had it or 99 out of 100.

Next question is do you think game processors take precautions not to contaminate their gloves, knives, tables, with bear meat when they process elk or deer? I'm going to have to ask my butcher about it...

20-Aug-19
solidifies my thoughts on bear meat - 'not fit for human consumption'

From: Grey Ghost
20-Aug-19
Just one more reason why I don't kill and eat bears.

Matt

From: Busta'Ribs
20-Aug-19
I had a friend in medical school that did studies on the risks of trichinosis in humans. He knew I was a hunter. When he learned about all of the horrible things those little parasites can do to a guy he called me and made me promise to never, ever eat bear meat again. I haven't.

From: Pig Doc
20-Aug-19
Matt, I heard that sous vide to 200 degrees does a number on trichinosis. You should be good to go now. :)

From: drycreek
21-Aug-19
And folks still ask me why I don’t eat wild hogs......

From: Slate
23-Aug-19
Good info

23-Aug-19
Trich dies at 137. It's an awesome candidate for sous vide, because you can rest assured every iota of meat has reached the minimum temperature. Plus, the wife likes it more than venison, so we will keep chowing down!

From: RogBow
23-Aug-19
Just gotta be smart about it, well done and keep things clean. Bear meat is great.

From: Matt
23-Aug-19
Bear can be excellent, easy enough to cook it to a temperature to put you in the clear.

From: Franklin
24-Aug-19
Not up to speed on the "sous vide" but I think the longer, slower cooking methods above the 137 degree mark is your safest bet. Making sure every section of meat is thoroughly cooked above the temp range is key.

I would eat a piece of bear jerky cooked in a oven at 175 for 6 hours before a bear roast....lol

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