Plantar Fasciitis
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
JTV 20-Nov-19
cnelk 20-Nov-19
Highlife 20-Nov-19
Ben 20-Nov-19
WV Mountaineer 20-Nov-19
Stubbleduck 20-Nov-19
HUNT MAN 20-Nov-19
cnelk 20-Nov-19
'Ike' (Phone) 20-Nov-19
Glunt@work 20-Nov-19
JTV 20-Nov-19
wyobullshooter 20-Nov-19
Russ Koon 21-Nov-19
Billyvanness 21-Nov-19
Zim 21-Nov-19
BULELK1 21-Nov-19
Sitting Bull 21-Nov-19
Scrappy 21-Nov-19
Russell 21-Nov-19
carcus 21-Nov-19
Bloodtrail 21-Nov-19
Norseman 21-Nov-19
Bou'bound 21-Nov-19
Tonybear61 21-Nov-19
Grey Ghost 21-Nov-19
Grey Ghost 21-Nov-19
Lost Arra 21-Nov-19
Big John 21-Nov-19
JT 21-Nov-19
Brotsky 21-Nov-19
Hawkarcher 21-Nov-19
map1 21-Nov-19
EMB 21-Nov-19
JTV 21-Nov-19
Grey Ghost 21-Nov-19
JTV 21-Nov-19
Burly 21-Nov-19
mn_archer 21-Nov-19
JTV 21-Nov-19
Beechnut 21-Nov-19
Norseman 21-Nov-19
lv2bohunt 21-Nov-19
bfisherman11 21-Nov-19
Owl 21-Nov-19
Habitat 21-Nov-19
WI Shedhead 21-Nov-19
SBH 21-Nov-19
Grey Ghost 21-Nov-19
Whitey 21-Nov-19
RK 21-Nov-19
Ben 21-Nov-19
kakiat kid 21-Nov-19
Buffalo1 21-Nov-19
creed 21-Nov-19
Empty Freezer 21-Nov-19
Ace 21-Nov-19
zabwelch 22-Nov-19
Katahdin 22-Nov-19
Notme 22-Nov-19
BuzAL 22-Nov-19
SlipShot 22-Nov-19
JTV 22-Nov-19
SteveBNY 22-Nov-19
JTV 22-Nov-19
SteveBNY 22-Nov-19
JTV 22-Nov-19
Owl 22-Nov-19
JTV 22-Nov-19
RK 22-Nov-19
Titan_Bow 23-Nov-19
jcurri 23-Nov-19
JTV 23-Nov-19
elmer@laptop 23-Nov-19
Dave 24-Nov-19
Shaft2Long 28-Nov-19
fubar racin 28-Nov-19
Bou'bound 28-Nov-19
Dave 28-Nov-19
Shaft2Long 02-Dec-19
David McLendon 09-Dec-19
TwoDogs@work 09-Dec-19
Owl 09-Dec-19
lawdy 09-Dec-19
JohnyRingo 09-Dec-19
oake 10-Dec-19
lawdy 10-Dec-19
Dave 10-Dec-19
Bob H in NH 10-Dec-19
Randy Green 10-Dec-19
lawdy 10-Dec-19
BuzAL 13-Dec-19
moon 13-Dec-19
JTV 13-Dec-19
From: JTV
20-Nov-19
whos had it, how did you manage it, how long did it take to clear .... my left foot/heel is bad right now ... Ive read about all I can on it and self healing is generally what the docs recommend, so what did you do to get back to normal ... being a runner and climbing up and down those LW sticks is what did it I'm sure ..... never had it happen before till now

From: cnelk
20-Nov-19
I used two items that helped a lot. First was rolling a racquet ball on the floor with significant amount of pressure - second was freezing a Gatorade bottle full of water and rolling that on the floor. The cold and the ridges in the bottle really worked good

It won’t go away overnight

From: Highlife
20-Nov-19
Use climbers and stop running. Seriously thou took me a couple of months to get heeled up. Just toughed it out sure the hell wasn't any fun

From: Ben
20-Nov-19
I've been fighting it for a couple months. It's finally getting better slowly. I've been using Ibuprofen, insole supports, rolling a golf ball. cold pack, toe raises and Achilles stretches { like runner stretches). Don't know what caused mine but, it has made walking miserable.

20-Nov-19
I sucked it up and limped around on it for months. It'd get netter then, I'd go barefoot or wear flip flops and it'd get worse again. Took me a while to figure out what was causing it for me. But, I just kept on keeping on. As you know, the pain was immense when standing and walking on it for the first time after being off your feet for a while. And, the wrong foot wear will flare it up again. So, when I feel it coming on again, I assess the shoes I have worn the days before, or quit going bare foot. Because once it becomes fired up, it is a terrible battle to get your foot back pain free.

From: Stubbleduck
20-Nov-19
As much as possible ignored it......several months on and off then it rather suddenly went away and has not returned in several years.

From: HUNT MAN
20-Nov-19
Frozen water bottle and a tennis ball helped me. Took about 6 months to go away . Stretching my Calf muscles helped a lot

From: cnelk
20-Nov-19
Another exercise you can do is put the ball of your foot on the edge of a stair tread and push your heel down and hold it there. Relax and do it again a few times. That will stretch the tendons in the bottom of your foot

20-Nov-19
Stretch you Achilles and get some good inserts...If you have a Good Feet store, they worked for me and actually had relief pretty quick!

From: Glunt@work
20-Nov-19
Cheapo insoles from Walmart did the trick for me. Been about a year and a half with no pain and I skip the insoles most of the time now.

From: JTV
20-Nov-19
after waking in the morning is the worst, I read before even getting out of bed do stretches, then roll a ball or such before taking your first step .... this blows, I still have a deer season to finish out and I have two 1 week draw hunts coming to try and kill my Doe ... 1st one starts this Monday .... crap !!

20-Nov-19
Been fighting mine for 25yrs. Rolling my feet on ice-filled bottles helped to some degree, as did wearing quality orthotics. However, what worked best was being able to retire and stop pounding my feet on concrete day after day!

From: Russ Koon
21-Nov-19
When I had my bout with it a few years ago, Walmart still had some Dr. Scholl's shoes that had the extreme insole height and the "rocker bottom" outsole shape that put all the weight on the middle of the arch at every step.

The pain was intense when the wife dropped me at the entrance to our Walmart and I hobbled slowly to the electric cart parking area and drove one to the shoe department.

I tried on the only pair they had left, a women's size 11 that was slightly tight on my size 9 feet, but not too bad, and at least they were black. Took a couple steps and put my old shoes in the box and wore the rocker bottom ones to the checkout counter with only mild discomfort. Wore them everywhere for the next couple months, and the pain went from still there but tolerable, down to pretty much a thing of the past. They weren't very good on the rainy mornings when there was mud to deal with, but most days I was still able to hunt few hours, and maintained the yard work and chores with little delay.

By the time the shoes wore out, the problem was gone and never returned. Didn't take them that long to wear out, as they weren't exactly tough work shoes.

I don't know if the Dr. Scholl's ones are still available, but plantar fasciitis is also a very common problem among nurses, who also pound the concrete floors of hospitals for long hours, and I've seen shoes of similar design and probably better quality in online nurse equipment catalogs. Both my sisters and my youngest brother also developed the same problem, and they also eventually found relief, after hundreds of dollars of treatments and orthotic insoles, by getting the shoes with the rocker bottoms and wearing them pretty much exclusively until it had disappeared.

The effect is pretty similar to the one you get with rolling the frozen water bottles or the rolling pins, but you're doing it with every step instead of for a few minutes a couple times a day.

Sure worth a shot. Talked with several others who had the same results since, and a few who didn't. Not a miracle cure for every case, but it seems to have a better batting average then most other "solutions".

Good luck Jeff, it can be a very painful and stubborn problem. Hope the rocker bottom shoes are the answer for you, too, as it's the quickest and most economical one I know.

21-Nov-19
Custom insoles that have solid arch support. I have 2 identical sets that I rotate through my footwear. It’s brutal when you have it. All the above remedies help but the footbeds kept it from coming back for me.

From: Zim
21-Nov-19
Most recent horrendous case of mine lasted 4 long years. During that time I tried every remedy in the book, short of cortisone shots. None worked. My doctor told me to wait at least 18 months before considering surgery. Spoke to four who had the surgery and it worked for 3 of them. My job requires me to be on my feet for 3 months/year and at times I was very concerned I might lose it. The pain was unbearable. Finally just focused on staying off my feet as much as possible, and ultra padding every shoe I had. Also got a pair of Hoka gym shoes, and did not walk indoors without foam house shoes. Very gradually the pain faded in the 3rd year. In 2017 optimistically burned 15 Arizona elk points and got through the hunt OK. Had a few very weird short intense "spark" events and it was healed.

I am 60 now, jogged 20 miles/week for 40 years. Suffered several minor cases of PF from basketball over the years that lasted a month or two, but nothing like this last episode. It was triggered by jumping a mere 18 inches from climbing sticks to the ground from an awkward maple tree, but muscles were stiff from hours in the cold. I think I partially tore the ligament? Anyway now I am all about prevention, and continue to pad all shoes/boots and wear house shoes religiously. Even cautiously resumed some jogging, but only with my Hoka's.

Anyway, wanted to share what worked for me..........time. I hope you have a minor case.

From: BULELK1
21-Nov-19
After mine went away it was suggested to me to wear Suppression type socks under my normal socks when doing training/hiking/hunting activities and to this day I still do wear them.

Hang in there JTV

Good luck, Robb

From: Sitting Bull
21-Nov-19
All the above is good advice. Mine was so bad I could hardly walk at times. Did a hunt for fallow deer when it was at its worst and wore my mountain boots with a nice solid footbed, was the only time I had relief. I finally went to the Podiatrist and got fitted with rigid insoles to support my very high arches. I wore them in all my shoes and avoided flip flops ad walking barefoot. Took months to get back to normal including a really good lower body stretching regime, not just Achilles but calves, hamstring, and lower back. Physio said they are all connected and tightness in one area will lead to incorrect functions of other areas and joint alignment. It has been a few years now and I've never felt better. Started up running again about 2 years ago and can do up to 10 miles without pain 2-3 x per week. Run with my orthodics in my shoes though. It also helped by buying shoes that are designed as a comfort fit with soft soles. You'll will find a system that will work for you.

From: Scrappy
21-Nov-19
Took me forever to figure out what it meant to stretch. Sounds simple, but everything you read just says stretch. I finally found some info that got through to my thick skull. PLEASE READ CAREFULLY BECAUSE THIS WILL FIX IT, STRETCH YOUR ENTIRE BODY. I know it sounds simple and maybe it is to most folks but it took forever for me to get it. Mine was my hips, once I started stretching everything I quickly started getting better. Still took a while to get it completely gone but I haven't had any issues since.

From: Russell
21-Nov-19

Russell's embedded Photo
Russell's embedded Photo
Although my case is not as severe as most, for the last few weeks I've been trying this lotion. My feet feel a lot better and I also rub it on some sore muscles. It cost about ten dollars for a 4 oz bottle. It's worth a try.

Good luck

From: carcus
21-Nov-19
I had it bad about 6 or 7 years ago, it took almost 2 years to heal, I was into running at that time, I will never do that again! Everyone I know who runs has issues.

From: Bloodtrail
21-Nov-19
Hockey tape and fresh doe milk really seems to alleviate the pressure. Lol

Seriously though. Time and more time. It’s great once it gets loosened up, but it’s those first steps once you’ve been sitting a while that killed me. One thing that helped me was to go buy all new gym shoes/sneakers. I guess it’s like inserts that really help, but I just went with new shoes. It reconditions your foot to work right and heal.

From: Norseman
21-Nov-19
Boot at night, Advil and Graston technique and heat.

Three days and it should be 90% better.

From: Bou'bound
21-Nov-19
I have had it a couple times. I run 4 plus miles nearly every day and have for 20+ years. When it comes you just need to stop doing the things that create the condition and let it heal. The first bout was 13 year ago. I took time to let it get better then as soon as it when it felt better I started doing things again (running) and found out you really need to go well beyond when it stops hurting and truly let it heal before commencing activities. I did than an have been running since.

3 years ago I got a mild case a couple months before a BC goat hunt and I was scared to death it would kill the trip. I backed off training just prior to the trip and felt pretty good going into the trip, but not totally pain free. I fully expected it to get worse on the the trip. Just the opposite happened. The climbing, stretching, odd foot angles, etc. on the trip totally cured the PF and never a twinge on the trip or since.

You have to rest it and you'll be fine

From: Tonybear61
21-Nov-19
Might not be the condition you describe. See a foot doc. I have had 2 surgeries, both feet getting ready for my third to regain mobility. The other solutions above are only temporary at best.

From: Grey Ghost
21-Nov-19
Jeff,

My sister had a bad case of PF. Her podiatrist recommended that she try a pair of minimalist shoes called Vivo Barefoot. The idea is they put your foot in a more natural position, and promote walking on the balls of your feet, instead of heel-to-toe, just like little kids do. Now, they are the only shoes my sister will wear. She raves about them so much, I decided to try a pair. I bought the Tracker FG (see link). I have to say, they were the most comfortable boots out of the box that I've ever had. They definitely change the way you walk for the better. My minor foot and ankle pain is all but gone since I started hiking around in these boots. I highly recommend you give them a try.

Good luck, brother. I know you're too stubborn to let a little foot pain slow you down. ;-)

Matt

From: Grey Ghost
21-Nov-19

Grey Ghost's Link
Sorry, forgot the link.....

From: Lost Arra
21-Nov-19

Lost Arra's Link
Heel That Pain insoles plus the ice, exercises mentioned above. Rolling frozen golf balls on my arch with light standing pressure helped.

From: Big John
21-Nov-19
Dealing with same issue now, slow recovery!!!

From: JT
21-Nov-19
Fought it for years when I was in the Army. Tried all the above to no avail. The only thing that worked was I finally got to see a podiatrist who prescribed night splints. They were hard to get used to, but in the end after 30 nights I was cured. Have not had a problem in almost 20 years.

From: Brotsky
21-Nov-19
I've dealt with it off and on for many years now. What has helped me is losing weight and proper insoles in my boots and shoes. Those two thing combined really helps keep it at bay.

From: Hawkarcher
21-Nov-19
I’ve had it since last December. Feels fine after a shower and while wearing running shoes. Kennetrek boots feel good too. But after my after hunt nap I can barely stand. A foot massager (Homemedics I think) from bed bath and beyond does help loosen it up.

From: map1
21-Nov-19
I run a lot went to doc and got custom orthodics it healed quick. Still running today no problems.

From: EMB
21-Nov-19
+1 with Map1. Custom orthodics from foot doctor. Once I got the proper foot support (high arches), it went away pretty quickly and stayed away. Ice worked for me until it cleared up.

From: JTV
21-Nov-19
I wont quit running thats for sure, but for now it is for sure out of the question... I wont quit hunting, as one mentioned use a climber instead of the sticks, only possible in some locations, and my best locations a climber wont work ... never had this problem till this year.. 40 yrs of running and climbing tree's for hunting ... it is an ass kicker ... I'm using a baseball and the water bottle for the rollers and stretching.... I need to get to the pharmacy to see if they have those night boots/splints, I see 'em on line, but I want to compare prices ...... but why now after all these years ... age ?? ... or did it all those miles and tree's finally catch up ?? ..... BTW, Aleves help some when it come to masking the pain, but not a cure ......

From: Grey Ghost
21-Nov-19
Jeff,

My theory is our bodies are just like a vehicle...the harder and the farther they are driven, the more likely something is going to break down. Of course, sitting in a garage for long periods of time isn't good for them either. There's a fuzzy line in-between that is different for everybody. Listen to your body.....

Good luck, man.

Matt

From: JTV
21-Nov-19
Thanks GG ........

From: Burly
21-Nov-19
Had surgery .

From: mn_archer
21-Nov-19
Jeff,

several years ago I had it bad. The pain was intense and unbearable. I asked Kyle about it and he told me about the frozen soda bottle.

It worked but I did it several times a day for a couple weeks

From: JTV
21-Nov-19
I'm doing the bottle now (feels good) .. how many times a day did you use it ...??

From: Beechnut
21-Nov-19
Walk Fits, Buy them on amazon. There amazing, I have them in almost every shoe or boot

From: Norseman
21-Nov-19
JTV Do it as often as you like Do it on you calf muscle also, with lots of stretching in between

From: lv2bohunt
21-Nov-19
I started using Dr Scholls Athletic inserts in 2004 and haven’t had another occurrence since then. I have become extremely particular about the shoes I buy and that may be a big part of it.

From: bfisherman11
21-Nov-19
I had it and found a product called "Heal my Pain" It is an insert that I moved from one pair of shoes to another. It fixed me up and it has never come back.

From: Owl
21-Nov-19
Forgive me, for expediency, I skipped all the previous replies. I tried everything to no avail. All the tricks - splints, massage therapy, various inserts (including high dollar customs).

It wasn't until I went to minimalist footwear did I cure the problem. I started with 5 Fingers and about 2 weeks of ginger walking on a treadmill with ever-decreasing pain... After 2 weeks my feet were strong enough I never had a re-occurrence. Felt freaking fantastic. Turns out my only problem was that modern footwear chronically weakened my feet to point of acute maladaptation.

It has been 10 years and my feet are better than ever. Interestingly, my wife who had a PF onset about the same time as me but lampooned my footwear choices suffered for years after I was chasing her through the house with no problems. She is a bright woman (sharper than just about everyone I know) but just cannot bring herself to believe that newer is not necessarily better. She is not alone. Humankind is commonly retarded to an extent beyond reckoning.

From: Habitat
21-Nov-19
Get a shot and be done with it,they hurt like hell but I found the arch support stores to be a rip off.Go buy them yourself and keep in shoes

From: WI Shedhead
21-Nov-19
Never ever go barefoot on hard surfaces. My podiatrist recommended Sandles called Trellics . They are a $40 life saver. They wear great and have tons of cushion support in the right places

From: SBH
21-Nov-19
My old man had that for awhile. He got custom orthotics and it was a game changer. Kinda spendy but it worked for him and he has no issues at all anymore.

From: Grey Ghost
21-Nov-19
"It wasn't until I went to minimalist footwear did I cure the problem."

Great minds think alike, Owl. See my post above. My minimalist boots have become my favorite footwear.

Matt

From: Whitey
21-Nov-19
Get some arch compression sleeves, best $12 you will ever spend. I go barefoot more than I wear shoes. In the mean time take wide athletic tape and run it around your arch, pinching the arch in very slightly. I go around twice and have the tape cover from just in front of the top of the arch to just in back of the knuckle of the big toe. You will know if you get it too tight. Shave the top of your foot first. I do this every run, hike long walk or if I am going to be on my feet a long time. I learned it from an athletic trainer. I wear the compression sleeves when I go barefoot or with flip flops.

From: RK
21-Nov-19
I got it bad about 25 years ago. I was way to busy hunting/fishing with clients and non stop travel so I had no time or the disposition to mess around with it so I went in immediately got custom orthotics plus two rounds or shots. Was gone quickly and has never returned. I still wear the orthotics

From: Ben
21-Nov-19
Man, you guys make me feel better I thought I was just getting old and was one of a few that had PF.

From: kakiat kid
21-Nov-19
Mine flares up in the summer from wearing flip flops and poor footwear. A few days in arch supports (the ones I use are on the pricey side) and I'm good as new. I'll never wear cheap footwear again

From: Buffalo1
21-Nov-19
My wife is just getting over it. Roughly 6 mos. She did foot stretches with a belt, rolled foot on frozen bottle of water and did a lot of keeping foot wrapped in an ice pack ( when sitting and watching TV). She also got arch supports and a pair of shoes designed to give arch/foot support for PF.

It was a very painful experience and slowed her movement and social life quite a bit.

I would not wish it on anybody.

From: creed
21-Nov-19
I had it for 2 years and was sure I wasn't ever going to walk without pain. I went through steroid injections, ice packs followed by hot water, stretches, insoles, different shoes, night braces. Surgery seemed the only alternative left until my doctor decided to try alcohol injections to kill the nerve. It was the answer to my prayers. I have had zero pain for the last ten years and the only side effect is a numb spot the size of a dime on my heel.

21-Nov-19
I got a 1 time injection from the foot doc. Not sure what it was but it cured mine.

From: Ace
21-Nov-19

Ace's Link
My Girlfriend has it, she swears by these:

From: zabwelch
22-Nov-19
Had it bad once, to the point when I could barely walk in the morning during my high school years. Golf ball in the freezer did the trick for me. Hurts like no other while rolling it out. Pop a couple ibuprofen and roll it. I also wore insoles from Dr. Sholes in my shoe on the front half of my foot. Eventually got better after a couple weeks of doing that.

From: Katahdin
22-Nov-19
The staussberg sock has worked very well for me

From: Notme
22-Nov-19

Notme's embedded Photo
Notme's embedded Photo
I got it while in pt for a torn meniscus...in both feet...lol I kept telling the my calves burned and feet felt like I was walking on needles, they said to stretch it..this roller was the only thing that seemed to help.got it at wally world.

From: BuzAL
22-Nov-19
I realized that the DrScholl's diagnostic "machine" didn't take into account what kinda shoe any suggested insert would be in. So how can it possibly know?

After a few bouts with it, I've found the best thing is to pay attention and notice what's happening whenever you get new shoes. Don't start with an insert in a new pair of boots. That hurt me once, taking 'em out fixed it. Rather, try different inserts as soon as you notice any discomfort. If one insert doesn't make that pair work in a few days, try another kind.

If a few different inserts won't help, ditch those boots before you get hurt!

Rolling a frozen barbell under my foot helps a lot. The threads and weight stops crunch that stuff up. I still do it often.

The first time I had it, I was cured by that decreasing prednisone dose regimen, stretching, and changing to an insert with a higher heel compared to the front. Other boots require different insoles, or none.

I'd say to experiment while paying close attention.

From: SlipShot
22-Nov-19
Cautionary tale, take it for what it is worth. I had Plantar Fasciitis in both feet and suffered for 5 + years with it. My right foot got better my left foot never did. I tried ever thing including steroid shoots. I finally schedule surgery, but in between the time I scheduled the surgery and the time I had the surgery I damaged the nerve in my foot due to the Plantar Fasciitis. I now have a neuroma and will probably have to have surgery to get rid of it. I highly suggest if you are not getting better that you don't wait too long before you get the surgery. I no longer have problem with Plantar Fasciitis but the neuroma allow not as painful, SUCKS!

From: JTV
22-Nov-19
I went out today and got some Scholls PF inserts/insoles and some Air Plus PF insoles and a pair of PF sleeve socks .. the frozen water bottle is helping it seems, as is the stretching .... the Aleves is also helping, but I cant do those for extended periods ..... I'll see by Monday, as I plan on starting my 1 week draw hunt of two which means utilizing my LW Sticks .. I'm done with running till Feb/March or so, but I do want to finish out this deer season at least .... I will say this crap HURTS and SUCKS !! weeks

From: SteveBNY
22-Nov-19
It's a form so severe tendonitis. The tendons in the bottom of the foot shrink/shorten during the night. Need to stretch the foot back and the calves in bed BEFORE the 1st step. Putting weight on without stretching rips them and counters the little healing that happened at rest. They make a brace for sleeping that keeps the foot /toes stretched back and stops the natural relaxing that shortens the tendons.

Also stretch the calves several times during the day as well. Fought it for years - this is the only thing that allowed it to heal. 15+ years without a flair up.

From: JTV
22-Nov-19
if what I have now dosnt help, the night boots/splints will be the next move ... I'm not stopping hunting , even if I have to crawl to the tree .. once the season is closed OR I kill the doe I want, then I'll work on a serious remedy plan, right now, it is all about finishing the season and being able to work .... Ive been thru worse ........... ...

From: SteveBNY
22-Nov-19
JTV - morning stretch before 1st step is about the best thing you can do now. Sit up - take right hand palm to bottom of left foot. Put fingers between toes and use hand to thoroughly twist and stretch all the tendons in the foot. Repeat left hand to right foot. The boot I know has helped several - it keeps the tendons from shortening. You can do similar with a couple ace bandages

From: JTV
22-Nov-19
I'm not giving up and I'm trying what I can ... I plan on being in a tree Monday AM before light, even if I have to crawl :0) .... I'm laying off till then .. one more 100lb+ doe is all I want ... hell, if I can use a crutch and body brace to get in a stand after a fall (1996), this aint crap ...

From: Owl
22-Nov-19
JTV. Save your money on the splints. Frustrating waste of money, imo. I know first hand. If you're tough enough to keep powering through, you're tough enough to strengthen your feet and just be done with it.

From: JTV
22-Nov-19
I did not get a night brace/splint.... just the insoles/orthodics ... I'll continue with the frozen bottle and stretches ....

From: RK
22-Nov-19
Owl. No offense but Horse Shit

Why be tough enough when you can be SMART enough.

JTV. Get up off your ass go to the doctor get the shots get the orthotics and get well fast and continue enjoying life and hunting

OR you can crawl to the blind and be a tough dumb ass marine

But by god you got to hunt

LMFAO!!

From: Titan_Bow
23-Nov-19
I suffered from it pretty bad when I had started running. At the time, I read a bunch of stuff on the minimalist footwear movement and it really made sense to me. Over six months or so I worked my way into minimalist shoes and have never looked back. Fast forward now almost 10 years and I have no foot pain ever. It does create a few problems I was not intending. For one, it’s made my feet wider and I now wear a size and a half larger than I used to. Secondly, I never want to put my feet into heavy constrictive boots/shoes again. I actually hunted this year in Merrell Trail Gloves most of the season. I know it’s not for everyone, and everyone’s body is different, but for me, it just made sense to at least try and let my body mechanically work like Mother Nature intended. I’d go out on a limb and say no Indian or tribesmen ever suffered from it, pretty sure it’s a first world problem created by the fact we cradle our feet in supportive boots and shoes most of our life. It changes our gait and it changes the mechanics of how we walk.

From: jcurri
23-Nov-19
I had it for months and tried everything. Nothing was effective until I got a shot. It was gone within days and never came back.

From: JTV
23-Nov-19
a doc will be the last resort... just after two days of the frozen bottle and wearing some half socks that are supportive for sleeping over night and made for PF, plus the insoles, I woke up this Am and got out of bed with minimal pain compared to last week ... I'll continue with what I am doing for now ... I do plan on starting my draw hunt and being in a tree Monday AM as I try for a Doe .... the wind is supposed to be perfect for one of my favorite locations on the place ... ;0) ... "I aint got time to bleed" !!

From: elmer@laptop
23-Nov-19
I have had it twice. First time took me 6 months to get rid of it. 2nd time took 9 months. Did lots of stretching, got heel lifts in my running shoes, got massage work, and slept in a boot that kept my ankle at less than 90 degrees overnight. Also used tennis balls and rollers on the foot. Best results came from sleeping in the boot. Also lots of ibuprofen to help reduce inflammation. Both times the cause was running shoes that had worn out.

From: Dave
24-Nov-19
Haven't read the whole thread but I'm sure it's full of useless "remedies" that guys have tried for months or "swear by" but the reality is that most, if not all, are symptomatic measures and do not address the problem. Things like rolling the arch over a can or ice bottle, etc are a joke. The problem is tightness of the Soleus complex. This is NOT just the Achille's. The soleus must be isolated to be stretched correctly. In my practice over 20 yrs, when I had people isolate and stretch this muscle, NONE ever had to resort to shots or anything else to resolve the problem. Try this test. Lean into a wall like you're going to do a standard calf stretch.(Most people know how to do this one) To isolate the soleus though, you must bend the knee forward while keeping your heel on the ground. I've never had a patient with PF who could even bend their knee without the heel lifting off the ground. One should be able to bend the knee forward 30-45 deg without the heel lifting off the ground with normal flexibility of this muscle. The soleus gets tight and pulls on the calcaneus(heel bone) which results in traction enthesopathy of the plantar fascia. Try the soleus stretches along with gel heel inserts for comfort for awhile and I can almost guarantee you won't need anything else. Warning though, because you're putting stretch on the plantar fascia as well while stretching the soleus, it will get worse temporarily before it gets better.

From: Shaft2Long
28-Nov-19
I have it real bad. Have worn the hard plastic inserts for about 20 years now. They help.

Never going barefoot and using orthotic flip flops and slippers helps. I spent the last year wearing normal flip flops, which I wear even in winter, and the condition became VERY bad in my left foot.

If you can afford the time off and are a good patient the surgery I think is worth it. I tore the plantar fascia off the bone on my right foot about 5 or six years ago. Doc told me I basically did what they would do during surgery. As an electrician and very active person the boot you wear and the recovery process was real hard on me. I was not a good patient. Worked as best I could and still did a fair amount of fishing. I say that only to say that my right foot does not bother me anywhere near as much and is often unnoticeable now compared to the left.

From: fubar racin
28-Nov-19
Night splints twisted x work boots and a frozen tennis ball man that was hell

From: Bou'bound
28-Nov-19
Hunting out of a tree stand with plantar fasciitis is endurable. You can do it

From: Dave
28-Nov-19
Hate to break it to you Shaft but the hard plastic orthotics were probably the worst thing you could do and likely led to surgery that would have otherwise been unnecessary. Let me guess, they were prescribed by a Podiatrist. Guys, do yourself a favor and NEVER see a podiatrist for a foot condition. Most, if not all, are simply salesmen who sell you stuff you don't need that make your problems worse so you need more stuff they're selling. Seek out a good orthopedist, especially an orthopedic foot specialist. While it may seem logical to see a podiatrist because they are "foot specialists," they are way undertrained to manage the vast majority of conditions that they think they can manage. A podiatrist has 2 yrs of training in making orthotics and treating minor foot conditions while an orthopedic foot specialist has 10 yrs of training. Which one would you trust?

From: Shaft2Long
02-Dec-19
Man, I still wear those inserts to this day.

09-Dec-19
I was a runner from way back 10K, Half Marathons, Triathalons and Xterra. Not being built like the typical runner 6'1" 225# I dealt with Plantar Fasciitis off and on. I ran in the best shoe I could find with custom insoles, did all the stretching for PF and during my worse bout used a Class 4 Therapeutic Laser which really worked well. I'd own one but they aren't cheap. Recently and years later, I'm 62 y/o now and still run some and noticed a knot medial mid arch in the Plantar fascia. Plantar Fibroma is my new thing to deal with as a result of all the micro tears in the Fascia over the years, hopefully it won't get too bad because treatment options are few, basically stretch, maybe some steroid shots and pretty much suck it up and deal with it. Getting old, not for sissies.

From: TwoDogs@work
09-Dec-19
I had it pretty bad a few years ago. My doctor said I could spend a few hundred dollars on custom shoe inserts or about $50 on Birkenstock inserts. I bought the Birkenstock inserts. The Birkenstocks actually apply pressure to proper area. They started helping immediately. It took a couple of years before is was completely pain free. I still place the Birkenstocks in my shoes as a preventive as I do not want it again.

From: Owl
09-Dec-19
RK, knowingly going through life weak and maladapted is not “SMART.”

From: lawdy
09-Dec-19
I had it so bad that I could hardly walk when I got out of bed. I coach runners and I was a barefoot runner in college. I never had an ache or pain. I decided to try barefoot shoes. The pain was gone within days. I wear them now and 5 years later, still no pain.

From: JohnyRingo
09-Dec-19
Lawdy-

Which barefoot shoe do you recommend?

From: oake
10-Dec-19
I'm working my way through this maze currently. I just received orthodic inserts from my podiatrist last week. My pain level was never terrible, just bothersome and ongoing.

My .02 is get to a professional and have them provide some guidance.

From: lawdy
10-Dec-19
I wear both Nike’s and under armor. Go to a store that sells running shoes where the sales people are runners. Some people have to break in gradually to barefoot shoes. I didn’t. A parent of one of the runners I coach is a podiatrist. He told me the best shoes and hikers are Oboz. Everyone is different. After every workout, I have my runners do a cool down mile barefoot on the grass just inside the rubberized track. They love the feeling and never a problem. Good luck and I hope you find what works for you.

From: Dave
10-Dec-19
"I had it so bad that I could hardly walk when I got out of bed. I coach runners and I was a barefoot runner in college. I never had an ache or pain. I decided to try barefoot shoes. The pain was gone within days. I wear them now and 5 years later, still no pain. "

EXACTLY!! You don't see African natives or Aborigines with PF. The foot is designed to flex. Putting a rigid orthotic into a shoe prevents it from doing so with every step. This is a ploy that I'm convinced podiatrists are taught in school in order to create more problems and drum up business for themselves. 90+% of foot problems I saw in my practice that were previously "treated" by podiatrists were either caused or exacerbated by the hard, rigid orthotics. If you want to use an orthotic(although most people don't need them in a shoe with proper support), go with a soft or semi-rigid one like Spenco or Superfeet. Get rid of the hard plastic ones like I used to tell my patients and their problems went away. PF is caused by contracture or tightness of the plantar fascia. This is why the initial steps in the morning are painful. The fascia and soleus contract(shorten) at night, oftentimes due to the tight sheets and covers at the foot of the bed forcing the foot into a plantarflexed position and the initial steps out of bed stretch it out and pull on the insertion. This is why it's crucial to stretch the soleus which pulls on the heel and subsequently pulls on the plantar fascia leading to insertional inflammation. Trust me when I tell you: Start focused stretching of the soleus and put some soft gel insoles into your shoe(for symptomatic comfort more than anything as they are not therapeutic) and the problem will eventually resolve. Warning though, it may get slightly worse before it gets better as stretching of the soleus will pull on the plantar fascia and aggravate it initially. But, as the soleus gets more stretched and elongated, it will take pressure off the plantar fascia and the area will heal.

Finally, DO NOT get cortisone injections into the plantar fascia. This is another ploy by podiatrists to make you feel like they're doing something for you but all it does is inhibit healing and mask the problem for a while until they can eventually milk an unnecessary surgery out of you.

From: Bob H in NH
10-Dec-19
I've been struggling with this for a bit, I've started stretching before I get out of bed, simple lay on my back flex my foot towards my knee, pulls from feet through calfs, then bend knee to move stretch down towards heel move. Flex toes "up" even by putting the other foot on it.

This has made those first morning steps close to pain free. Then do the wall stretches outlines somewhere above.

From: Randy Green
10-Dec-19
Stretch 20-30x a day lose 15-20 lbs if necessary. I feel for you bud...been there it sucks

From: lawdy
10-Dec-19
Zola Budd, an Olympian from South Africa, was a barefoot runner and a lot of us tried it for long distance. One of my coaching colleagues was a Olympic marathoner. We were talking about foot problems and he commented on how over-engineered running shoes are. He too runs barefoot in the woods. My runners love to train on grass minus shoes. It also forces one to run with good form, not slamming the heel down ahead of you. Perfect stride for a long distance runner. Good post Dave.

From: BuzAL
13-Dec-19
Dave, Are you a doc? While trying your stretching suggestion, I notice that by the time my knee gets well-bent my knee is turning "in" and waist is dropping. I guess all that has to happen to go down far enough? I can get to about 40 degrees before my heel lifts, and don't currently have a problem. But I'll start doing this stretching to keep it from recurring.

From: moon
13-Dec-19
I did the stretches, ice bottles and orthodics . Still struggled with it until one day I was at a trade show and let a guy in a booth put a 10's on my foot (small electric pulse). It already felt better then I went home and used an old one we had for a half hour for several days and haven't had a problem since.

From: JTV
13-Dec-19
so far so good, been wearing orthodics (Scholls/airinsoles) and stretching the heck out of my feet/calves.. my left foot is 'better' ... since I'm done climbing my LW sticks and hunting for now, I'm resting and stretching daily, wearing my half socks designed for PF ... I do stretches before getting up in the Am and wear supports/orthopedics before walking in the house ... it's better, but I expect it will be months befor being 100% ... I hope come Jan. I'll be bunny hunting/Coyote hunting and running in the spring ... proper PF stretching seems to be the big help, along with the insoles .. come spring I hope to be back to my running ..

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