E-Bike stuff
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
GhostBird 30-Jul-21
Grey Ghost 30-Jul-21
Jaquomo 30-Jul-21
Shiras42 30-Jul-21
Knife2sharp 30-Jul-21
Jaquomo 30-Jul-21
brettpsu 30-Jul-21
Pat Lefemine 30-Jul-21
Jaquomo 30-Jul-21
Basinboy 30-Jul-21
smarba 30-Jul-21
Scoot 30-Jul-21
smarba 30-Jul-21
Jaquomo 30-Jul-21
Scoot 30-Jul-21
smarba 30-Jul-21
jingalls 01-Aug-21
Jaquomo 01-Aug-21
jingalls 01-Aug-21
txhunter58 01-Aug-21
jingalls 01-Aug-21
boly 01-Aug-21
jingalls 01-Aug-21
GhostBird 02-Aug-21
KSBOW 02-Aug-21
jingalls 02-Aug-21
Jaquomo 02-Aug-21
GhostBird 02-Aug-21
Grey Ghost 02-Aug-21
eBike John 02-Aug-21
Landshark Launcher 03-Aug-21
From: GhostBird
30-Jul-21
Let's talk more about e-bike stuff, ha. If you want to debate the good/evil of the e-bike or it's use, this is not the thread for you... move along to one of the other hateful threads.

I'm thinking about getting an e-bike and have questions regarding accessories.

Gun-Bow Holder ?... what are people using? Lock ?... I know if I got a bike, I would have to have some type of a good lock. Hauling the bike in pickup bed ?... are there bed or bed rail mounted racks?

I have not looked around yet for any of these products, just thought I would narrow my search with some Bowsite info. Thanks.

From: Grey Ghost
30-Jul-21
I asked about bow/gun holders when I bought my e-bike. The consensus was my bow would be safer attached to my backpack rather than a bike mounted holder. So that's what I did, and it worked out fine.

I've hauled my e-bike in the back of my pickup several times using nothing but a couple of ratchet straps crisscrossed to the frame. I've since purchased a hitch-mounted rack intended for small motorcycles. It works well, but it's a bit cumbersome to put on and take off.

There are dozens of good cable locks available. Just make sure it's long enough to secure both wheels and the frame. I prefer the roller combination type lock that doesn't require a key that can get lost.

Good luck. I think you're going to really enjoy being an e-bike owner.

Matt

From: Jaquomo
30-Jul-21

Jaquomo's embedded Photo
Jaquomo's embedded Photo
I bought a bow-gun scabbard and really didnt like carrying my bow there. So it's on a shelf. I much prefer carrying it on my back. I also got a small two wheeled trailer and it is a wonderful addition. It can be used as a one man game cart as well.

Also, install a small tool bag with a flat repair kit. Mine fits on the seat post.

From: Shiras42
30-Jul-21
This is not related to accessories, but I know if I were going to buy another one I would not get the hub motor. I would get the high torque mid drive motor and if I didn't have to worry about the restrictions where I was riding I would do the 1000W motor.

From: Knife2sharp
30-Jul-21
I have two now - don't ask why, LOL.

I would not get a gun/bow holder, too much bouncing around, and if it's in the back as a scabbard, it'll be trickier getting on/off the bike, since they're bigger/taller than a mountain bike (MTB) and you need room to swing your leg over, as tipping it to the side isn't natural, especially if you're short like me, < 5' 9". A backpack with a bow/gun holder would be ideal, or slinging it over your shoulder.

You could put it in the bed, but also a bit awkward and they heavier than a MTB. There's multiple options for a bike rack in back: motorcycle racks, fat tire bike holders, game carriers modified with wheel holders, etc. I use a Maxxhaul bike rack, with Swagman fat tire holders - much cheaper than a rack marketed for E-bikes, and I don't need straps to hold the bike in place.

A rack on the back of the bike is a must and the trailers work slick for hauling blinds, chairs, stands, etc. Mine is rated for 250# and I'm hoping to haul a deer out with it this fall. They can get bouncy with nothing on them and flip over while you're riding, so adding some weight, like a small pack works good.

From: Jaquomo
30-Jul-21
The Bakcou Mule lets you toggle between 750 and 1000 watts. I have not kicked mine up to 1000 - havent needed to.

From: brettpsu
30-Jul-21
What about hauling a 62" recurve? Would you guys use a rack then? On a MTB I typically sling the bow over my neck but it's not the most comfortable or safe thing.

From: Pat Lefemine
30-Jul-21

Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
I like to carry my bow on the handlebars. I won’t use a pack any longer.
Pat Lefemine's embedded Photo
I like to carry my bow on the handlebars. I won’t use a pack any longer.
There’s no bulletproof way to transport a bow on a bike.

I use to lash it to my pack, now I use these handlebar mounts. I wiped out on my EBike with the bow lashed to my daypack and it snapped off my sight. Understand that if you land wrong all your weight and the pack weight will be applied to the bow. Plus it’s a PIA to keep strapping and unstrapping to your pack.

It also cost me a bear in NY. I had taken my bike to a remote stand with the bow lashed to my pack (to be removed at the base of the tree). While walking the 100 yards from my bike to the stand I spotted a bear at 40 yards walking to me. I had no time to get my bow. That damn bear walked by me at 25 yards broadside. I had never seen a bear before, or since during the legal bear season.

I ordered these holders the next day and never looked back. I even crashed my bike a couple times and zero damage to my bow.

BTW, I found these holders work better than the ones without the offset since they keep my bow a few inches away from the brakes and handgrips. I don’t use the bungees either.

My 2c

From: Jaquomo
30-Jul-21
I had those and they worked great until I crashed. My bow was ok, but one of the holders broke. Where I ride, a lot of tight turning through rocks and logs is required, and I didn't like the extra weight on the handlebars. YMMV.

From: Basinboy
30-Jul-21

Basinboy's embedded Photo
Basinboy's embedded Photo
I used the same mounts as Mr Pat but I mounted them to the side. It works ok but the quiver is a little in the way. Doable but would be easier if I removed it. I did buy a Rambo cart and it is a needed accessory for hauling game and gear

From: smarba
30-Jul-21
If you use a trailer, a single wheel trailer tracks WAY better behind your bike . This allows you to pick a smooth line for your bike and the trailer follows. Double wheeled trailers constantly hit stuff to either side of the riding line you're on and bounce back and forth. Single wheel trailer follows you perfectly. Dual wheel trailers are all but useless unless you have a relatively wide, relatively smooth road/trail.

From: Scoot
30-Jul-21
Smarba, do you have any specific examples/pics of a trailer that you think is the cat's meow?

From: smarba
30-Jul-21

smarba's embedded Photo
smarba's embedded Photo

smarba's Link
The discontinued BOB trailers were arguably the most prevalent single wheel trailers back in the day and can still be found used. Lots of other similar models and brands are readily available that I'm not as familiar with. A quick search turned up the Topeak Journey as an example, although I don't know anything about it.

I can't stress enough that single wheelers track wherever you ride, but dual wheel will bounce all over the place due to rocks, bumps, logs, whatever, to either side of your bicycle and are all but useless except for very wide, smooth trails and roads.

From: Jaquomo
30-Jul-21
I use my dual wheel on some pretty rough two-track trails with no problems. But I am definitely getting a single wheel next.

From: Scoot
30-Jul-21
Thanks guys. For those with one wheel cart experience, what is the "thing to get"? Also, how hard are they to attach and detach?

From: smarba
30-Jul-21
While connection systems vary, the BOB single wheel I'm familiar with attaches via a hook onto a specialized rear axle/skewer. Trailer goes on and off in 15 seconds easy peasy.

From: jingalls
01-Aug-21
I’m with smarba on the trailer. I purchased the Bakcou Mule and the single wheel trailer. Attach the posts on the rear wheel and the trailer just snaps on and off. The Bakcou model also has the adjustable suspension system. So you can dial in the suspension for the load on the fly. And in the elk woods it tracks perfectly! If you slide by a tree by 2” so will your trailer. I added a Gator Grip on the trailer for my bow and love it. I don’t think it vibrates as much as on the handle bars.

I also added the water proof pannier bags and wouldn’t go with out them!

Another great option to smooth out your ride is with Redshifts “ShockStop System”. It’s a handle bar stem and a seat post shock absorbing system. It might seem spendy…but it will turn a Mule with a good front suspension and those pig balloon shock absorbing tires. Into a smooth as butter mountain hunting machine. Once you ride with them, you will be buying them for your mountain bike and road bike too. Check em out guys. You won’t regret it!!!

From: Jaquomo
01-Aug-21
The new Mules we just bought have a shock absorbing seat post. I've ridden mine over some rough stuff and it really makes a difference!

From: jingalls
01-Aug-21
Mine has the the shock absorbing seat post. But it only goes up and down. And when I hit the rough stuff it would make a loud banging noise as the spring slammed the seat back up to the stop. Very cheap system but it does help. Redshifts is light years better. But way more expensive too.

From: txhunter58
01-Aug-21
Wow. $229 for a bike seat. I would have to ride a lot more than info to make that worthwhile.

From: jingalls
01-Aug-21
That’s the post…no seat! 8^D

From: boly
01-Aug-21
The Bakcou one wheeled trailer has a load rating of 90 lbs. any better options out there for hauling out elk?

From: jingalls
01-Aug-21
That rating is a general rule number. It all depends on how rough of ground your on. I’ve hauled 150# with mine. Stiffen the suspension to its max and don’t ride like a maniac and you’ll be fine.

From: GhostBird
02-Aug-21
Thanks for the input... another question; how waterproof/resistant are the electronics on a ebike? Controller, battery, bike with battery removed, etc.

From: KSBOW
02-Aug-21
Some day I will have e-bike so awesome even just for riding rough roads opposed to driving everyday driver on mountain roads. I spend a lot of time biking and gravel long distance rides have become a big part of my year round fitness. The only thing in biking world that is hard to swallow is price tag, nothing I mean nothing is cheap. So price tags on these do not surprise me, my current saddle (seat) will set a guy back 130-180 depending on what your looking for.

From: jingalls
02-Aug-21
I have got mine wet before and had no problems. I suppose if you ran it off into a pond and submerged it for a while you might have a problem? But even then, don’t turn it on open everything up and make sure it is well dried and you should be good to go.

I have gotten mine muddy and taken a garden hose to wash it. No problems!

From: Jaquomo
02-Aug-21
I have a friend who drove several hours through a downpour and had his controller (cockpit) short out. Had to replace it. For that reason I carry a quart ziplock freezer bag with a couple heavy rubber bands in my little tool bag. Otherwise have never had any problems in rain, snow, mud, creek crossings, etc. When hauling on the outside rack I put a little piece of duct tape across the battery contact port. We never carry them on the rack with batter attached, just for weight purposes.

From: GhostBird
02-Aug-21
Thanks guys... figured you had to protect the electronics in a downpour situation and a good tip to tape over the battery contacts when transporting.

From: Grey Ghost
02-Aug-21
Ghostbird,

When my e-bike is exposed to weather, I use a large heavy duty garbage bag that I put over the entire handlebar area and tie it off.

Be sure to have allen wrenches for every sized bolt on your e-bike, and check every nut and bolt for tightness regularly.

On my elk hunt last year, one of the fixing bolts that holds the crank arm to the axle loosened up and fell off on one of my rides. The crank fell completely off about a mile later as I was pedaling hard up a hill. Fortunately, the resulting crash wasn't bad, and I was able to find the fixing bolt lying in the trail. I didn't have a large enough allen wrench to reinstall it, so I resorted to using a fathead screwdriver wedged into the bolt head. That worked, but it wasn't ideal. I'd also recommend using Loctitie on any fasteners that you don't expect to remove.

Also, consider getting tire liners, or better yet, tubeless tires. Getting flats when you are deep in the woods is no fun, trust me, BTDT.

Matt

From: eBike John
02-Aug-21
The guys have already given you all you need to know. When someone invents the prefect brow holder I'll be rich, until then most prefer strapping to the backpack.

Some options are the Rhino Grips which are like handlebar clamps. Or the Gator Gripp which is very popular, the only caveat is it was designed for the hood of an atv but it will work on the handlebars of a bike. The Scabbard that Rambo make has a tendency to vibrate.

On a sidenote however, Bakcou have solved a different issue. Ebike batteries are lithium cells so cold weather depletes batteries quickly. Bakcou have come up with a battery cover that connects via a usb cable in the battery, which in turn heats the cover and keeps the battery warm. Resulting in good range even in cold weather.

03-Aug-21
Here's a tip for you, put locktite on EVERY screw,and also carry a spoke wrench. My rambo takes a size 13.

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